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Old August 19, 2012, 07:41 PM   #1
_Hawkeye_
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quick question

Ok, running the numbers, approx. how many 45 colt would 1 pound of powder reload? No need to precision, just getting a feel for how much reloading for thei cartridge would save.
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Old August 19, 2012, 07:45 PM   #2
ruger357w
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there's 7000 grains in a pound of powder. so find the powder you want to use and look in a manual for a load then just do the math.
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Old August 19, 2012, 07:51 PM   #3
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4 minutes for the correct answer. Did that work for you?

Welcome to the forum and to reloading. Thanks for asking our advice.

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Old August 20, 2012, 08:10 AM   #4
Misssissippi Dave
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I figure about 3 to 4 cents per round for powder cost. It depends on the load used and the cost of the powder. This should be a ball park figure. Primers about 3 cents or less depending on where you buy them and how many you get at a time. The big cost is the bullet. I get my cases from factory ammo I have shot so I seldom ever include the cost of the case. It isn't unusual to be able to load pistol ammo for half the cost of factory ammo when you buy components in bulk. Cases normally can be used several times. Even if you did buy them, you have to figure the cost of a case over its life. An example would be, if a case is normally used 20 times then the cost of the case for one loading would be 1/20 the cost of the original price.

Many reloaders taylor their reloads to what they want (heavy to light loads) and get accuracy normally reserved for premium ammo. Most also compare the cost saved to the cheapest ammo available for a given round. I think it should be compared to the better ammo out there once you have a load dialed in for your needs. This makes the savings more realistic in my opinion.

I do have factory ammo for SD/HD use, but it seldom gets shot at the range.
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Old August 20, 2012, 12:21 PM   #5
_Hawkeye_
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I don't have a manual because I haven't actually decided to reload yet. The efficacy of your responses are astounding and insightful into the nature of the community though.
thx MississippiDave
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Old August 20, 2012, 12:52 PM   #6
rclark
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Couple of examples under 255g .45 Colt bullet.

I load 20g 4227 . So 1lb can will fill 7000/20g = 350 rounds.
I also load 8.5g of Unique. So 1lb can will fill 7000/8g = 875 rounds.
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Old August 20, 2012, 01:36 PM   #7
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Excellent, so in general, alot of loaded rounds from a pound. thx
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Old August 20, 2012, 02:22 PM   #8
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If the GENERAL question is... "Is it worth it to me, money-wise, to get in to handloading?", then we can really answer that question, too.

Take two different cartridges and you'll see two different angles on the same question.

Let's say you only own one firearm and it's a 9mm. Currently, 9mm is the most popular selling center fire ammo on this planet and typically, you can find a single box of 50 rounds of it for around $12 out the door. More or less depending on where you are located and where you shop.

When handloading, the bottom line dollars are obviously manipulated by the costs of your components and BY FAR, the most certain way to get the lowest cost in your components is to do two things:
--buy extremely popular items that are made by many competing places
--buy AS MUCH IN BULK as you can possibly pull off

If I buy a pound of powder, I can expect to be out the door for $22-$24. But when I buy most of my powders, I get them 8 pounds at a time, dropping my price per pound under $16.

If you go to the local place and get a sleeve of 100 primers, you are looking at around four bucks. I buy mine 10,000 at a time in a group buy and I'm at about $2.50 per hundred.

If you buy a box of Hornady XTPs at the gun shop, you are looking at around $17 for a box of 100. Myself, I use a 125gr commercially cast LRN for 9mm, and the last time I bought them (3,000) they ran me $6.18 per hundred, shipped to my door.

At the end of it all, I can turn out my favorite 9mm round for just a hair under five bucks for a box. If I bought primers 100 at a time, powder by the single pound and if I bought those expensive XTP slugs at retail, a box would cost me just under $12 for 50.

Why do I bring up 9mm? Because 9mm is the rock bottom. As it's the most popular ammo in the world (center fire), it's also the cheapest.

.45 Colt on the other hand, it's HORRIBLY expensive.

I make .45 Colt also... currently, using a 200 grain plated bullet. Buying my stuff in bulk as I do, but using a powder that I only purchase by the pound, I can make 50 rounds of .45 Colt for just under $9 a box of 50.

What's .45 Colt cost in the stores? How much cheaper when you buy a case lot online or by mail order? I see .45 Colt in gun stores for like $30 a box and more. It's horribly high priced.

So... if your question is, "Is it worth it to handload?", my answer is always going to be "YES!", even if you only need 9mm. But if you need something like .45 Colt, my answer is, "you'd be CRAZY not to consider it and the savings will be unbelievable."
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Old August 20, 2012, 03:22 PM   #9
_Hawkeye_
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THis is much more helpful. Given your examples, as I am not particularly short on money, I would not reload 9mm. But I think I will for 45 colt.
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Old August 20, 2012, 04:19 PM   #10
Misssissippi Dave
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I was thinking about the least of the cost savings I can get from reloading. I load 9 mm jacketed for about 1/2 the price of the cheapest factory ammo I can find even by the case. Anything else the savings increases. I load just about everything with jacketed bullets and they cost a lot more than lead does. I don't load 45 colt. That would be a round I would surely load if I was to even think about shooting it. I have seen what the local stores sell it for when they can get some in. Components to reload are normally easier to get than it is to find some factory ammo of certain calibers. Once you have the components on hand you just need a little time to produce what you want or need.

If you are even considering reloading in the future, I suggest you start saving all your brass now. You can never have too much brass when you start loading your own. Even if you don't want to reload within a few years, keep the brass dry and it will hold its value better than many other things I can think of.
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Old August 20, 2012, 04:28 PM   #11
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Quote:
I would not reload 9mm. But I think I will for 45 colt.
Oh.... once you get your equipment ... you'll eventually reload for 9mm too . Why? Because reloading isn't just about cost saving.... It is about finding the best loads possible for your revolver or pistol (or rifle). The satisfaction of rolling your own. Trying to find that 'perfect' load.... And it's fun!! I reload for all the calibers I shoot and haven't bought a factory load for ~30 years (other than .22 of course). Doesn't take long to 'recoup' the cost of your reloading equipment. As a bonus it allows you to shoot twice as much for the same amount of money.... so in the long run it really doesn't save you the $$ you 'thought' you would be saving LOL .
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A clinger. When guns are outlawed, only outlaws will have guns. Single Action .45 Colt (Sometimes improperly referred to by its alias as the .45 'Long' Colt or .45LC). Don't leave home without it. Ok.... the .44Spec is growing on me ... but the .45 Colt is still king.
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