The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > Hogan's Alley > Handguns: The Revolver Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old August 14, 2012, 04:42 PM   #26
chris in va
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 26, 2004
Location: Louisville KY
Posts: 12,562
It's the first of many handguns, so no worries.
chris in va is offline  
Old August 14, 2012, 06:54 PM   #27
Sinclair
Junior Member
 
Join Date: August 12, 2012
Posts: 6
I would say the model 88 I have, and now in my possession, is in good shape and I paid 290 for it. And the person who advised against dry-firing came a bit too late as the person I purchased from dry fired a few times. to check the mechanism. Seeing as it's old and has been dry fired, now I am worried it may not work properly or something.. But I have much to learn.
Sinclair is offline  
Old August 14, 2012, 09:16 PM   #28
burrhead
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 6, 1999
Location: Chihuahuan desert, Texas
Posts: 427
Aw man, $290 isn't bad. As I said in my first post, gun prices are very location specific and that may be “market” where you live. As to the age of the gun, my EDC was made in the mid eighties and I only own two guns made in the nineties. My go to deer rifle’s a Rem 722 from the fifties. The age of the gun doesn’t matter as much as the mileage. Also, some dry firing ain’t no thing.

Be happy.
__________________
Join the NRA and TSRA

The older I get the better I was.

Last edited by burrhead; August 14, 2012 at 09:40 PM.
burrhead is offline  
Old August 14, 2012, 10:35 PM   #29
psyfly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 27, 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 781
Another encouragement not to worry too much about what you paid, the education aspect is important.

My mantra in such cases is a sigh followed with "I've paid more to learn less!".

And I try to keep it that way .

Go shoot the heck out of it and enjoy life.

W.
__________________
Show me the data
psyfly is offline  
Old August 15, 2012, 07:22 AM   #30
qwiksdraw
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 23, 2012
Posts: 392
Look at it this way, you over paid only if you don't like the gun.

If you do like it and have tons of fun shooting, feel like you're carrying a reliable gun for protection (if applicable) and find yourself showing it off now and then...is worth what you paid? Maybe what your new gun will bring is priceless.

So learn everything you can about your new gun, its history and the ammo you use and the accessories you need... you know, really get into it!

Shoot often, be safe and have fun!
qwiksdraw is offline  
Old August 15, 2012, 07:39 AM   #31
Mayor Al
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 20, 2011
Location: Southern Indiana, Near Louisville.
Posts: 211
Don't fret about a slight case of "Buyer's Remorse"...having doubts about the wisdom of a purchase, especially if you have a waiting period from the time you commit to buy and the time when you actually have the item in your hand. This happens to many people...and not just for guns,

We recently contracted to have a bathroom remodeled. It was a $6000 job. There was a two week period after we signed the contract before the job was started. Many times during that two weeks my wife and I talked about our concerns about what we were spending etc etc. That is "Buyer's Remorse".

Once you get your gun and do the exercises talked about here, all "Remorse" will evaporate.

I own several TAURUS handguns and enjoy shooting all of them.
Mayor Al is offline  
Old August 15, 2012, 08:15 AM   #32
osbornk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 11, 2012
Location: Marion, Va
Posts: 218
If you lived in a state like Virginia where you can walk out of the door with your gun in about 10 or 15 minutes, you would not have buyer's remorse because you would be shooting and enjoying it immediately.
osbornk is offline  
Old August 15, 2012, 08:42 AM   #33
mrbatchelor
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 18, 2010
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by osbornk View Post
If you lived in a state like Virginia where you can walk out of the door with your gun in about 10 or 15 minutes, you would not have buyer's remorse because you would be shooting and enjoying it immediately.
This is true. It's the waiting that sets your brain into high gear running the other 500 doubt scenarios around.

And even if they give you darned gun the next day you'll see some lucky joker they gave a free gun AND a free box of ammo and you'll think what the heck did I do wrong.

As long as the gun shop isn't obviously engaged in crooked deals, if they stand there patiently helping you when you're still learning then you're really paying for their knowledge. You aren't overpaying for the merchandise. Their time is money. Try running a small business if you don't believe that.

MB
mrbatchelor is offline  
Old August 15, 2012, 08:47 AM   #34
dgludwig
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 12, 2005
Location: North central Ohio
Posts: 5,182
I think that you paid a decent price for a firearm that is a good choice for a first time gun owner. A medium frame, .38 caliber revolver is a very versatile firearm: it is simple and reliable to operate (no safety, slide release, magazine release, decocker buttons/levers to worry about or complicated malfunction clearing drills to practice); it will be plenty accurate; recoil and noise is fairly mild; ammunition is relatively cheap and easy to find and it can be effectively used for multiple purposes (home defense, target shooting, camping/hiking gun for plinking or protection, concealed carry and hunting are some roles that it can play). The .38 caliber revolver is a good starting platform and, as time goes on and your shooting interest and knowledge of firearms develop, you can add guns to your inevitable inventory that will be better suited for more specialized uses (no serious golfer plays with one club or informed angler fishes with one rod ).

If you're not familiar with shooting and/or firearm safety, I would strongly urge you to enroll in a good training and instruction facility in your area. And to practice a lot with your new gun. Finally, give some thought to joining the National Rifle Association. Without the influence of this fine organization, I doubt that your concerns of paying too much for your Taurus would matter much as you wouldn't have been able to buy any gun at any price in the first place.

Good luck and welcome to The Firing Line!
__________________
ONLY AN ARMED PEOPLE CAN BE TRULY FREE ; ONLY AN UNARMED PEOPLE CAN EVER BE ENSLAVED
...Aristotle
NRA Benefactor Life Member

Last edited by dgludwig; August 16, 2012 at 09:10 AM.
dgludwig is offline  
Old August 15, 2012, 09:32 AM   #35
Pointshoot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 23, 2004
Posts: 233
A mid-frame 38 revolver is an excellent choice as a first handgun. Only a .22 revolver might be argued by some as a better choice, but the .38 has much more value for actual self defense.

The OP mentioned that he bought his gun on 'an impulse'. Well, its likely that he'd been thinking about it for awhile. For whatever personal reasons - self protection, recreation, etc - he had a handgun in mind. Good for him that he took action and bought one.
Pointshoot is offline  
Old August 15, 2012, 05:03 PM   #36
lee n. field
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 12, 2002
Location: The same state as Mordor.
Posts: 3,358
Quote:
I would say the model 88 I have, and now in my possession, is in good shape and I paid 290 for it. And the person who advised against dry-firing came a bit too late as the person I purchased from dry fired a few times. to check the mechanism. Seeing as it's old and has been dry fired, now I am worried it may not work properly or something.. But I have much to learn.
A few times won't hurt it.

Other revolver advice: don't "flick" the revolver closed. That's hard on the crane, and can potentially bend it (which is an expensive fix).

You might want to look into different grips, if the existing ones don't work well for you. I think (not finding much on that model) is a medium frame Taurus. Many accessories for K-frame S&Ws work with the medium frame Tauri, but not grips.

Take a class if you can. Shooting is a whole body activity, and there are details of stance, grip, trigger control, etc., that are not obvious.
__________________
"As was the man of dust, so also are those who are of the dust, and as is the man of heaven, so also are those who are of heaven. Just as we have borne the image of the man of dust, we shall also bear the image of the man of heaven. "
lee n. field is offline  
Old August 15, 2012, 10:07 PM   #37
Webleymkv
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 20, 2005
Location: Indiana
Posts: 9,928
While I'm not particularly familiar with Taurus' offerings (I'm a S&W guy myself), from what I've been able to find it seems that the Taurus Model 88 is a medium frame, six-shot, .38 Special double action revolver with a design based loosely on the S&W K-Frame (the design of most Taurus revolvers is based on that of S&W). While the Model 88 appears to be discontinued, the currently-produced Model 82 seems to be very similar to it.

Because it is based upon the S&W K-Frame, many K-Frame accessories such as holsters and speed loaders would likely work with your revolver. As has been mentioned, however, grips and other model-specific parts are probably different enough to preclude interchangeability.

As has also been mentioned, a medium-frame .38 Special revolver is a highly underrated type of handgun. While the .38 Special is a fine cartridge which delivers a useful level of power, from a gun of that size and weight it still produces very moderate recoil and muzzle blast and thus is well-suited to inexperienced shooters. Likewise, a DA revolver has a very simple and easy to understand manual of arms which makes it a platform well-suited to a new shooter. Truth be told, the majority of gun owners would probably be just as well served by a medium-frame .38 Spl as anything else even though that type of gun doesn't seem as "cool" or "tactical" as a monster magnum or whiz-bang semi-auto.

As long as you're happy with the gun, don't worry about how much you paid. Enjoy your revolver and don't mind what other people think about it.
__________________
Smith, and Wesson, and Me. -H. Callahan
Well waddaya know, one buwwet weft! -E. Fudd
All bad precedents begin as justifiable measures. -J. Caesar
Webleymkv is offline  
Old August 15, 2012, 11:22 PM   #38
Newton24b
Junior member
 
Join Date: February 10, 2009
Posts: 974
to the op

dont worry that your not finding the sales slip to be accurate on the actual model number. Its most likely the person behind the counter doesnt understand that the taurus product catalog.

i see bolt action rifles listed as automatic rifles everyday in gun stores.


wouldnt it technically be the model 66 or 64?
Newton24b is offline  
Reply

Tags
confusion , revolver , taurus

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:08 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.08237 seconds with 9 queries