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Old August 1, 2012, 05:58 PM   #1
zcar75
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Colt 1860 revolver problems

I am having a problem with my black powder revolve. After I shoot a few rounds, I am not able to take it apart. It sticks where the cylinder post enters the barrel assembly. I have tried using gun greese but no luck. Is there something else I can use? Thanks.
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Old August 1, 2012, 06:09 PM   #2
SIGSHR
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Sounds like fouling. There are various sprays on the market that can dissolve and flush it away. Remember too much grease can gum up the works as easily as too little.
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Old August 1, 2012, 06:46 PM   #3
Fingers McGee
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Gun grease and BP don't play very well together. I use Bore Butter to lube my arbors (thats the post thingy) and they never fail to come apart easily, even after 60+ rounds.

Use a little balistol & water to dissolve the crud thats keeping you from taking it apart.
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Old August 1, 2012, 06:56 PM   #4
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I just use a light coat of my over-ball revolver lube on the cylinder post thingy, the lube is just 50/50 beeswax/olive oil, and it keeps it working for a good 24-30 shots, then I wipe the arbor down to get the gummy stuff off, using either some Windex on a paper towel, or a disposable alcohol wipe (that I keep for swabbing between shots with the rifles) and recoat with new lube. If the pistol and/or the weather is warm though, my lube is almost as soft as Bore Butter anyway, so either would be a great choice.
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Old August 1, 2012, 07:32 PM   #5
Doc Hoy
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Fingers has been shooting a lot longer than I have....

... But I think the best thing you can do with Bore Butter is put it on popcorn.

I have two criticisms of it; a) it gets too runny in summer temps in hot revolvers, and b) it smells like a brothel.

Neither of these faults (it is only a fault if you don't like brothels) would prevent it from being effective as Fingers says to keep an arbor from seizing up.

I shoot about three cylinders, wipe it down when it is taken apart for loading the fourth go around and squirt it lightly with Rem oil.

This assumes it is taken apart for loading. I know not all folks take the revolver apart for loading and I also don't know if you can do this during a sanctioned event.
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Old August 1, 2012, 08:18 PM   #6
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I use Bore Butter and it does get runny in summer heat. I get five or six cylinders before it starts to bind. A Colt will run longer than a Remington on it. Remoil is not the way to go unless you load off the frame like Doc does. It's too thin.
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Old August 1, 2012, 08:59 PM   #7
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Bore Butter works well on my guns. I avoid petro based products on my BP guns, except for a wipe down with a tiny amount on the blued exterior surfaces. I always coat the arbor with a bit of Bore Butter when I finish cleaning. Sometimes I add a little more before and during a shooting session, this seems to keep fouling softer and easier to remove.
And, as Doc said, it does have an odd smell
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Old August 1, 2012, 09:33 PM   #8
Willie Sutton
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Bore Butter works, and is an old favorite,... except here in the Mojave where I find myself stuck for a month. Opened up the tube to slosh the arbor of the 1860 last Saturday and it was as thin as water. Probably not helpful that it's 120 in the shade though.

Any hot weather suggestions for a substitute?


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Old August 1, 2012, 10:46 PM   #9
Fingers McGee
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Sorry, I have no recommendations for arbor lube in very high temps like that. I suppose Beagle's 50/50 beeswax/olive oil mix would stay stiff enough to work. A similar concoction works pretty good as a wad lube. Never thought to use it on the arbor.

It's bad enough when it's around 100 here. I usually just wimp out and stay in the AC on those occasions - and there have been more than enough of those days around here so far this summer.

And I like the smell of bore butter Doc; but, I've never tried it on popcorn. What's it taste like
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Old August 1, 2012, 11:34 PM   #10
Beagle333
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Quote:
Bore Butter works, ... except here in the Mojave. Opened up the tube to slosh the arbor of the 1860 last Saturday and it was as thin as water. Probably not helpful that it's 120 in the shade though.
Any hot weather suggestions for a substitute?
I'd figure you could just mix some beeswax with your BB and stiffen it up a bit. Beeswax melts at 144-147°F. Or paraffin, if you have it. (Paraffin melts at 120-160° depending on what kind you get though, be sure it's the harder kind.)
Crayons work too, and they're kinda pretty mixed into my smokeless lube.
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Old August 1, 2012, 11:37 PM   #11
Willie Sutton
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Thanks Guys. I want to shoot this weekend here, so will be pressed to find beeswax. Seems like toilet base seals are made of this? Not terribly well equipped with choices in stores here in the desert. Lots of good shooting spots though. Pick any dirt road.


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Old August 2, 2012, 03:10 AM   #12
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Some where around a 50/50 mixture

of wax rings and vegetable shortening.

It is far from exotic and it does have a petroleum base (from the wax rings) but I don't find that it leaves a residue. If I need it stiffer I just raise the percentage of wax ring.

I have been using it for most of my shooting life and I like it.

I had a lead on some bees wax from a local guy but he stays too busy to hook up with me. I want to try bees wax, not because I am unhappy with my bore lube but because everyone swears by it.
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Old August 2, 2012, 05:49 AM   #13
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Synthetic motor oil.

Yeah, I know - no petroleum products shall be used, etc. But the synthetics are all high distillates so the incomplete burning problem is mitigated. A little goes a long, long way, however, so use it sparingly, like wet a rag with a thin film and rub it on with that. And it has the advantage of being widely available.

Also, any of the mineral oil (again, high distillate petroleum product) based rust preventers/lubricants like Ballistol will do the job. In this case, slather (love that word) it on. Try the fishing supplies section of the local hardware. Probably not a very big section in the Mojave, though...
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Old August 2, 2012, 07:43 AM   #14
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PAM cooking spray works on the cylinder pin of my remmi. Might work on the arbor of the colt models too. Just a thought.
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Old August 2, 2012, 09:09 AM   #15
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In extremely high heat, I use my home made black powder bullet lube on the arbor. It'll run for at least 6 stages before it begins to feel sticky.

Sam'l Colt put loading levers on his sixguns. I use them.
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Old August 2, 2012, 10:00 AM   #16
zcar75
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Thinks guys. I have bore Butter and bee's wax. I will give them a try.
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Old August 2, 2012, 10:27 AM   #17
Willie Sutton
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Two folks thanking. I've got a pint of Ballistol and between that and bore butter, Saturday shooting might result in a spray of liquid flying offa the old sulpher-burner, but I'll survive.

I'll see how the local hardware store is stocked for toilet ring wax as well. They *do* stock a good selection of cap and ball stuff, believe it or not.


"Well, I used to be a FFL, but no more, too much nonsense, all those inspections and such, so we just stick to these here Uberti C&B pistols. No permit needed, step right up and bring your cash. Sell lots of metallic ammunition too, especially in locally popular cartriges like .45 Colt. And lookie here... we stock a full selection of Howells cartridge conversion cylinders too... Most folks guess that we don't need an FFL 'round here to keep the local gentry happy and well protected against snakes and bipedial varmits on their desert ranches".


It seems that the local choice for ranch and home self defense has become a Uberti Remington copy and a Howells conversion cylinder in .45 Colt. Not an impractical choice, I might add. I feel well armed here with one. Truly. I kid you not. In the heart of over-regulated California, this is the way that people express their RKBA needs. It's where I came to learn to love C&B shooting. Walk into the hardware store, back wall gun counter, two guys talking about guns. One guy leaning, one on a stool. New guy welcomed with a cup of coffee. Poke thru the case, dig out a few, pick one, up to the counter and off to the sandpit. No papers, no hassle, "just like the old days". Time warp to pre-1968. Stack of New Army copies in the case, locals have figured out that Clint Eastwood had reloading figured out and that it works here too with cartridge conversion cylinders. They sell them to old ladies to keep by the bed. Just seems fitting with the desert outside of the doorstep to send folks off well armed (and not for CAS, but for the real thing) with their choice of an 1860 Army or an 1858 Remington. Only here is the debate on the merits of each considered carefully as a real question of life and death and not one of historical preservation. 1858's seem to win in the local vote. This is the last bastion of the cap and ball pistol used as a tool and not a toy.


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Last edited by Willie Sutton; August 2, 2012 at 10:43 AM.
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Old August 2, 2012, 02:27 PM   #18
Hawg
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Quote:
Yeah, I know - no petroleum products shall be used, etc.
IMHO you can use anything on the arbor. It's in the bore and chambers it becomes a problem. Some petro based stuff works with no problems like paraffin. It seems to be the degree of refinement it goes through.
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Old August 2, 2012, 02:58 PM   #19
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Hawg - you are correct. It's only the combustion chambers and bore where petroleum products (the lower distillates) are subjected to incomplete burning, thus forming tar. I was just responding to the myth.
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Old August 2, 2012, 04:12 PM   #20
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When I first started shooting BP I had no mentor and no internet to ask questions, probably should of purchased a book or two. I figured, I oil cartridge guns and air guns, may as well oil this here powder burner. Learned that lesson quickly, also figured how to remove a charge that would not fire.
Of course you guys are correct, bore and chambers are the only place it can hurt.
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