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Old July 5, 2012, 04:27 PM   #1
capodastro
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Barrel leading

I just started loading cast bullets and was wondering what I should look for when I'm cleaning my barrels as far as leading/lead deposits? should I look down the barrel with a flashlight? when I run a patch through, what will leading look like? Thanks for any help, or pics if you have them.
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Old July 5, 2012, 04:53 PM   #2
PawPaw
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You'll see "skid marks" and when you run a brush through, little flakes of lead will come out on the brush. However, if the bullet is of the correct alloy, the correct size and has the proper lube, you probably won't see any lead at all. I've got some cast bullet barrels that haven't been cleaned in three or four years.
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Old July 5, 2012, 05:19 PM   #3
Ethan.G
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i just got a hold of some LSWC for 45acp, they where givin to me from a friend who got them from her uncle and we have no idea how old they are, they looked good so i loaded up 40 of them and found some serious leading but only on the first inch or so on the barrel.

what could be causing this?

Last edited by Ethan.G; July 6, 2012 at 01:20 AM.
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Old July 5, 2012, 05:24 PM   #4
jepp2
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Quote:
should I look down the barrel with a flashlight?
A good light will let you easily see any leading that is accumulating in your barrel. You didn't state if you are loading for a pistol, revolver or rifle. If loading for a revolver, be sure and check the transition of the forcing cone for any leading.
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Old July 5, 2012, 06:21 PM   #5
BDS-THR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by capodastro
wondering what I should look for when I'm cleaning my barrels as far as leading/lead deposits?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethan.G
found some serious leading but only on the first inch or so on the barrel ... what could be causing this?
Leading is covered in comprehensive detail in this free e-book by Glen Fryxell (covers definition, cause, prevention and removal) - http://www.lasc.us/Fryxell_Book_Chapter_7_Leading.htm


Here's an excerpt. Author goes into detail for each leading location at the link.
Quote:
Definition of leading.
Leading is the deposition of significant amounts of bullet metal on the bore…

Location of the leading
Perhaps the single most telling piece of evidence is the location of the leading in the gun…
More at link.


Moderator Edit: Please read the board policy on quoting copyrighted materials.

Last edited by Unclenick; July 6, 2012 at 12:36 AM.
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Old July 6, 2012, 12:14 AM   #6
Edward429451
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So in short, the leading at the rear of your barrel would indicate that your boolits are under-sized, or had damaged bases which allowed gas blowby. Use the next size larger diameter boolit, .452 or .453 depending on what size boolit leaded it.
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Old July 6, 2012, 12:45 AM   #7
Unclenick
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Capodastro,

Patches can sometimes polish the lead enough to make it appear shiny and smooth, so it is hard to see without a bore scope because of the low angle of light incidence you get looking down a bore. As mentioned, a pass with a bore brush will take that shine right off of it, so you can then see that it's different from the rest of the bore. Stuff right up near the throat or the muzzle can often be seen because of the color difference.

I've had excellent luck with the No-Lead product. You put it in the bore and wait an hour and the lead turns to black crumbly stuff that patches right out.


Ethan.G

Those bullets might also bump up and do OK with a little more pressure. Using a faster powder to get to the same velocity, for example. Don't know what you were shooting. It's just another thing to try. Also try seating out to headspace on the bullet. That often reduces leading considerably if it doesn't interfere with feeding (see third image from left, below).

If that photo you posted is not yours and you didn't get permission to post it, you need to read the board policy on posting copyrighted materials, too, and delete it if you don't have or can't get permission.

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Old July 7, 2012, 08:06 PM   #8
Sid
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You don't need any fancy stuff to remove lead from the bore of a handgun. Here is a simple, low cost way to do it which works every time. Go to the laundry department of your local supermarket. But a box of Chore Boy copper cleaning pads. Depending on the caliber of your gun, cut off a small piece of the copper pad and wrap it around a brass cleaning brush. Dip it in solvent and run it up and back through the bore. You will see the lead on the surface of the Chore Boy pad. Since the pad is made of copper it cannot harm the bore. After the lead has been removed go ahead and clean the bore in your usual way.
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Old July 7, 2012, 08:34 PM   #9
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That works pretty well, but take a magnet with you when you go to buy it. The Chore Boy brand should be pure copper, as are some others, but lots of copper plated steel is out there, and you want to stay clear of that. The magnet will tell you which is which.

With the Choreboy strand method, as with the Lewis Lead Remover, if you run a patch soaked with Kroil or other penetrating oil in and let it sit for an hour to 24 hours, you get a cleaner, more complete removal in fewer strokes.

I retired my Lewis Lead Remover's after the No-Lead came out. I like being able to get everything with a patch and no brushing or scrubbing, but to each his own on that score.
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Old July 7, 2012, 09:46 PM   #10
chris in va
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I suspect those LSWC you loaded weren't lubed yet.
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Old July 8, 2012, 05:47 PM   #11
BruceM
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Either not correctly or sufficiently lubed or the wrong size. Contrary to current popular belief, they were not too hard although they may have been harder than necessary.

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