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Old May 28, 2012, 01:20 PM   #1
pelo801
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why no 2400 for 10mm?

i've noticed some overlap in some powders, like unique, blue dot, and true blue for 357, 44 and 10mm. but why not 2400 for 10mm?
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Old May 28, 2012, 02:40 PM   #2
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Alliant has a single 2400 recipe load for 180 grain Speer Gold Dot bullets in the 10 mm Auto on their web site. The fact they list a 2400 load only for the heaviest bullet they test and the fact it uses the greatest number of grains of powder but does not achieve the highest velocity listed for that bullet, tells me 2400 is simply too slow burning for good efficiency in the amount of powder space available and with the range of bullet weights available in 10 mm Auto.
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Old May 28, 2012, 04:37 PM   #3
Hammerhead
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Plus you don't roll crimp 10mm like you do magnum revolver cartridges, so it probably doesn't ignite well or burn efficiently.
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Old May 28, 2012, 04:59 PM   #4
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I've tried 2400 with 200-gr jacketed bullets in 10mm. The performance was distinctly inferior to Blue Dot. More interestingly, AA#9 performs significantly better than Blue Dot for such loads.

Of course, the performance and behavior of AA#9 and 2400 are very similar to each other in the larger cases of traditional magnum revolver cartridges, at pressures similar to those of 10mm. But different powders react differently to different cartridge characteristics—case capacity, case shape, caliber, barrel length, etc.—even if their burning rates in the most typical applications are similar.
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Old May 28, 2012, 05:19 PM   #5
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Couldn't imagine what the issue might be---I use 2400 for 40S&W all the time with great performance. Runs like a champ with 175gr SWC's or TC's. Seems you may just be not finding the data.
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Old May 28, 2012, 07:36 PM   #6
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Alliants 2004 manual lists a few 2400 recipes for 10mm. There are a few places to download it just type "alliant 2004 load data" into google.
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Old May 29, 2012, 12:44 AM   #7
tom234
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The older Alliant Reloaders' Guides have considerable 10mm 2400 data. More recent Guides tend to push only newer powders and [Speer] jacketed bullets.
http://www.castpics.net/LoadData/Fre...M/Alliant.html
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Old May 29, 2012, 09:49 AM   #8
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Interesting. Usually when you click on a powder itself at the Alliant site and look at all loads for it, you find the ones not listed in the overall guide. But not for 2400 in 10mm. Thanks for the link to finding the old data.
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Old May 29, 2012, 12:04 PM   #9
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Sadly, Alliant in recent years has shifted away from providing load data for many of their traditional powders. Also. they have eliminated a lot of lead bullet loads and IMHO have just been pushing ATK affiliate, Speer, jacketed bullets. When I last check there was no lead bullet data for 9MM, .40 S&W, or 10MM.
When I exhaust my supply of Alliant powder I'll be shifting to AA powders. AA has a good spread of data both lead and jacketed bullets.
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Old May 29, 2012, 01:02 PM   #10
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Quote:
Also. they have eliminated a lot of lead bullet loads and IMHO have just been pushing ATK affiliate, Speer, jacketed bullets. When I last check there was no lead bullet data for 9MM, .40 S&W, or 10MM.
Funny thing about lead--it's not difficult to load for even without published data for it. First, find a comparable bullet listed by weight and similar profile, then look at the pressures associated to the load data. If the pressures are within your lead alloy limit by BHN, you're good to go. Pressures with lead will be less than the jacketed load anyway, just start at the bottom and work your way up as usual.
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Old May 29, 2012, 01:09 PM   #11
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I also noticed the lack of data when I went to the Alliant site. I have some 2400 I wanted to use in .44 and .357 mags with cast bullets. It was somewhat dissapointing to see Speer jacketed bullet loads and not much more. The Lyman manual (I have both the 47th and 49th) is OK but kind of sparse IMO while the Lee 2nd lists a lot of powders for a given bullet weight but does not differentiate by bullet shape, type or design.

For example, the Lee manual lists at least two dozen or more powders for .45 ACP in each of the following: 200 grain jacketed, 200 grain lead, 230 grain jacketed, and 230 grain lead. While that gives you a huge choice of powders, the bullet data is almost too basic to be useful. The lack of different bullet types is drawn more sharply into focus when you realize that Lee also lists specs in any of the above categories with a COL spread of as much as .085" from one powder to another with the same bullet weight.

That's why I like to cross check load data from at least a couple of different sources. Some of the older manuals list higher charge weights for the same bullets shown in the modern manuals but don't have any of the newer powders. Newer manuals and internet sites have the newer powders but are more conservative with charge weights and as discussed above may be more "marketing driven".
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Old May 31, 2012, 07:54 AM   #12
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10mm caution

When working with higher-performance loadings in THIS cartridge be very cautious when straying into unknowns.

IME best 'hottie' choices include Blue Dot, 800X, and AA9.
Still be careful........
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