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Old May 24, 2012, 08:45 PM   #1
chrismiller
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Help identifying gun?

Hi,
I have a gun handed down frm my great grandfather and I would like to know more about it.
It is marked W & C Scott. The story was that they used to use Punt guns in Long Island Sound until the laws changed and it had to be a gun you could raise to your shoulder.
Don't know how old it is or its value. Any ideas?
Thanks,
Chris

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Old May 25, 2012, 07:07 PM   #2
Dfariswheel
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Here's what I've got:

W.C. Scott Ltd was formed in Birmingham England in 1834 by William Scott.
The company remained in the family hands until 1897 when it was merged with P. Webley & Sons to become Webley & Scott.
Although the Scott family was no longer part of the company, Scott labeled guns were made until 1935.

Scott manufactured double shotguns, single barrel shotguns, and double and single rifles.

Information on the hammer guns is limited, but the Blue Book of Gun Values says that Scott hammer guns range in value from $250 to $2,500 depending on condition and grade.
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Old May 26, 2012, 03:13 PM   #3
James K
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What gauge is it (or what is the inside diameter of the barrel)? Punt guns usually ran from 10 gauge (.775") up to 4 gauge (1"). They were mounted on punts (low boats), hence the name, so weight was not a factor. The idea was to kill as many ducks, geese, or whatever with one shot as possible. There was no sportsmanship involved; it was market hunting pure and simple.

Jim
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Old May 26, 2012, 03:32 PM   #4
RJay
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My interpretation of his post is that he has a normal W.C. Scott shotgun ( perhaps in 8 gauge , the English still use that monster ). He is just confusing the issue with analogy of punt guns. But hey, I could be dead wrong.
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Old May 27, 2012, 11:44 AM   #5
Dave McC
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It looks more like a large bore fowler than a pure D punt gun. Those tend to have mounting hardware on the forearm and the esthetics of a well drill.

Punt guns were strictly business. This has a patchbox, checkering, etc.

4-8 gauges were used as shoulder arms. Fred Kimble's meat gun was a 6 gauge.
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Old May 27, 2012, 07:26 PM   #6
PetahW
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Now, THIS is a punt gun



.
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Old May 28, 2012, 11:36 AM   #7
Avenger
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No, that is ARTILLERY...
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Old May 28, 2012, 12:50 PM   #8
RJay
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PetahW. Is that a .410 or perhaps a 28 gauge? Seems just the thing for a light handy garden gun to keep the black birds away.
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Old May 28, 2012, 07:08 PM   #9
James K
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Nah, it is for .22 shot cartridges. The size keeps down the recoil.

Seriously, PetahW, thanks for the pic. I have seen a couple of those guns, but none quite that big or that long. Point made on a "punt gun", though.

Jim
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