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Old May 4, 2012, 07:32 PM   #1
collectors
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German 320 bulldog

Hello all, i am looking to try find a rough date of manufacture on this old revolver it is marked August Stukenbruk, any help appreciated
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Old May 4, 2012, 07:37 PM   #2
Mike Irwin
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It has very similar lines to French and Belgian guns from the 1870s to the 1890s.
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Old May 4, 2012, 07:42 PM   #3
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Thanks very much Mike i was expecting it to be from more into the 1900's.
This one is in good working order i have since cleaned it up a bit, after i took this photo, will post another few photos of it tomorrow, are they worth much?
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Old May 4, 2012, 09:04 PM   #4
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They were also marketed as "Velo Dogs," which was a portmanteau of "velocipede (bicycle)" and "dog." Neat little Rube Goldberg design.

You won't find .320 ammunition, but they can shoot the .32 Short Colt.

If you can find .32 Short Colt...
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Old May 5, 2012, 10:28 AM   #5
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Thanks for that, i would not intend firing it, if it is so old, will let it go without main spring, would these have been used during ww1, as a back weapon, up or for commercial use?
Stukenbruk is stamped onto it but he seems to have been just a supplier.
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Old May 5, 2012, 12:08 PM   #6
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They were Europe's version of the Saturday night special. Inexpensive, generally cheaply made. I really doubt if it is German. I suspect Belgian or french. Proofs on the barrel and cylinder face would tell for sure.

Could have been an individual weapon during the was but certainly not an issue gun.
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Old May 5, 2012, 12:47 PM   #7
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German 320 Bulldog drawings

Does anyone know where I might access these online? Have just obtained one and trigger return spring apparently broken. Need see drawings to know disassembly/assembly. Thanks much in advance.
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Old May 5, 2012, 12:59 PM   #8
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Generally these all use the Chamelaux-Delvine (or something like that) lockwork. It was franco-belgian in design and was used extensively through the 1920s. Parts are generally catch as catch can. Probably be easier to have the spring made.
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Old May 5, 2012, 01:20 PM   #9
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Thanks, Mike

I plan to make the spring but need to know how it is shaped and how it relates to other parts of the gun. A sketch would do, but a nice print would be much better showing the parts exploded.
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Old May 5, 2012, 01:28 PM   #10
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These were generally extremely cheap guns. You'll be lucky if you find anything at all.
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Old May 5, 2012, 02:49 PM   #11
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Thanks for all information everyone, but it is German for sure as Stukenbruk is stamped onto it
Arytonsenna
I have some photos of the return spring it is just a v shape, i will work on more photos tomorrow, so you will have a clearer idea, of refitting etc. I can pass you on an email for a guy in France who has a return spring is yours a 380?

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Old May 5, 2012, 04:14 PM   #12
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I also think it is Belgium and Stukenbruk in only the retailer ( very common practice for the era ), BTW That type of firearm was never called a Velo Dog, A velo Dog is a completely different type of gun. The gun shown is a Pocket personal defence gun.
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Old May 6, 2012, 09:10 AM   #13
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In general terms yes that could be called a velo dog revolver. That term over time came to be used for many different types and models of small inexpensive European made revolver. I agree that the name stamped on it is provably just a retailer. I bet you find french or Belgian proof marks on it once you clean it up.
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Old May 6, 2012, 01:08 PM   #14
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Thanks for that guys this is stamped on it, also it has just two dot punch marks on the hammer, the cylinder, and main frame
I know it is not very clear from that photo, will have to upgrade camera
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Old May 6, 2012, 02:49 PM   #15
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This might be a better photo of this marking, and one of the name engraving any more oppinions about it appreciated
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Old May 6, 2012, 08:46 PM   #16
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Attn: Collectors

Mine is a 320. Just looking for a sketch or anything which shows how
this little gun goes together. Someone told me the trigger return spring
was broken since the trigger does not return unaided. However, now that
I have it apart, it may be just a misalignment of parts (the former owner
put it together wrongly??) since there was no broken piece inside.
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Old May 7, 2012, 06:05 AM   #17
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Collectors,


Hum. That proof mark is the definitive proof for blackpowder used in Germany when this gun was made, so it's looking like it WAS made in Germany. Interesting. I didn't think that the C-D lock system, or that style gun, had that much traction in the Vaterland.
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Old May 7, 2012, 04:25 PM   #18
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Mike cheers for a positive on id of manufacturing Country
I reckon this could be a rare little piece, most probably shipped here into Ireland during our war of independence

AyrtonSenna, this is the v spring and it's area, i hope this helps if not gives a shout back
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Old June 19, 2012, 08:29 PM   #19
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I managed to get a spring for this, and it is now working perfect, at least on the dry fire
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Old June 20, 2012, 06:49 AM   #20
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Do NOT dry fire it too much! As in, more than a few pulls of the trigger!

These old guns were notorious for breaking parts willy nilly if people dry fired them.
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Old June 22, 2012, 07:19 PM   #21
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Nice little folding trigger. It very much resembles the British Bulldog my grandfather carried with him when he was on the horse racing circuits in the 1890s/very early 1900s. His of couse didn't have a folding trigger . . .
I would think that this dates to the 1890s/early 1900s.
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Old June 22, 2012, 07:39 PM   #22
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I have to disagree with the idea that "velodog" is a generic term for any old European revolver. That is like saying that ".38 Special" is the same as "revolver" and that all revolvers can be called "38 Specials."

Velo-Dog (sometimes one word) is a cartridge, and a Velo-Dog revolver is a revolver chambered for that cartridge. A revolver chambered for something else is not a "Velo-Dog", any more than a .44 Magnum revolver is a ".38 Special."

I doubt that Herr Stuckenbrok manufactured that gun. But he was a retailer of bicycles (fahrrader), so he probably kept some guns on hand to sell to his customers who feared attacks by dogs. So does that make that gun a "velo-dog? Hmmm.

Jim
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Old June 23, 2012, 09:23 AM   #23
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Quote:
Do NOT dry fire it too much! As in, more than a few pulls of the trigger!

These old guns were notorious for breaking parts willy nilly if people dry fired them.
And given its appearance in the pics, I wouldn't want to fire it with live ammo, either.

Snap caps is the ticket, here.
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