The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The North Corral > Competition Shooting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old February 29, 2012, 09:08 AM   #1
markt99
Member
 
Join Date: January 18, 2012
Posts: 53
First IDPA Match

Hey guys,

I just shot my first IDPA match. Actually this is my first firearms competition of any kind.

This match was 5 stages, 4 of which were also the classifier (classifier stage 1 split to 2 stages at the re-taping point)

I shot CDP.

I was really nervous, but began to relax by the 3rd stage I shot. It was evident in my scores.

I guess I did ok. I was nervous and shot way too fast on the first 2 stages. The second stage I shot was classifier stage 3. Points down were 9, 11, and 22. If I had the last target in line with the other 2 I would have saved 5 seconds!

Classifier portion was 179.87 with 86 points down.

I think with a little less beginner nerves I could shoot a good bit better today without additional training, but not the 40 seconds to make sharp shooter.

I guess marksman isn't bad for my first match.

I'm going to try to practice 2-3 times a month and I hope to make 6 more matches this year.

Any advice.
markt99 is offline  
Old February 29, 2012, 10:35 AM   #2
MrBorland
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 31, 2007
Location: NC
Posts: 1,907
Congrats on your 1st match & on your classification.

Quote:
Any advice.
1. Points down on stage 3 of the classifier can really eat your lunch, so it pays to slow down to get your hits.

2. On trying to classify as a sharpshooter: Take your time. Shooting matches well is more important than shooting classifiers well. If you do the former, the latter will take care itself. The reverse isn't automatically so, and is often a quick route to discouragement. You've got a learning curve to get through, so focusing on your class right now is a distraction you don't need.

3. Accuracy before speed: Shoot matches within your control, and you'll get faster. Shoot too fast, beyond your control, and you'll get good at missing faster, which is a dead end. Strive to keep your PDs in check. I go by the 10% Rule: If time due to PDs is more than 10% of your raw, you're out of control.

4a. Dry fire regularly: It improves your gun handling skills & pays big dividends at matches. Plus, it's free. Practice your draw, movement & reloads. Things that become automatic are things you don't have to think about when the buzzer goes off.

4b. Dry fire regularly: Execute your movements perfectly, and remember that dry fire is as much about vision skills as gun handling. Practicing sloppy movements and/or getting on target without seeing your sights just to beat a timer is counterproductive. You'll just get good at being a sloppy shooter. Another dead end.

5. Have fun!
MrBorland is offline  
Old February 29, 2012, 12:23 PM   #3
RickB
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 1, 2000
Location: Western WA
Posts: 5,854
MrBorland is right on. Don't think of good classifier scores as an end in itself. Practice shooting fundamentals, but there is a lot more time to be saved on movement when you aren't shooting, than in pulling the trigger faster.
RickB is offline  
Old February 29, 2012, 03:46 PM   #4
Ambishot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 29, 2011
Location: US
Posts: 274
Congrats on your first match!

One quote that I always try to think of before entering a match is: "You can't miss fast enough to win." - Jeff Cooper

I'll echo what RickB and MrBorland have mentioned, pay attention to the fundamentals of shooting before you start thinking about getting quick. The speed will eventually come.
Ambishot is offline  
Old March 1, 2012, 03:53 AM   #5
Jeff22
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 15, 2004
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Posts: 582
IDPA classifier

I REALLY like the IDPA classifier match as a good comprehensive test of basic skills.

Stage 3 IS the classifier. With a little bit of practice, you can shoot the first two stages with a high score (even all the headshots) but people tend to crash & burn on Stage 3.

Things to avoid:
(1.) Don't crowd your cover. Stay back an arm's length. Having some distance will make it easier to roll around the side of cover and engage the multiple targets
(2.) Don't shoot too fast. People have a tendency to go way too fast on Stage 3 and drop a bunch of hits as a result.
__________________
You can only learn from experience if you pay attention!
Jeff22 is offline  
Old March 1, 2012, 12:13 PM   #6
MrBorland
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 31, 2007
Location: NC
Posts: 1,907
Yep, "shoot slow & move fast", and "don't crowd cover" are good nuggets.

I thought of another though: Splits & transitions - they should be pretty close to the same time. Do it right, and it'll sound like you're shooting to a metronome. Here's a good example. This gentleman with his old school Model 10 service revolver is an SSR Master, btw.

And here are some examples of what not to do. It may sound cool, but it's a very inefficient way to shoot, and they even proved it to us by showing the targets. I'm guessing these guys, with badass tactical glove, badass stance and cigar aren't IDPA Masters.
MrBorland is offline  
Old March 2, 2012, 11:33 AM   #7
hounddawg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 1, 2009
Posts: 760
Grats on your first match. I shot one season IDPA a couple of years back and was absolutely horrible at it, but still had fun. Got more into LR rifle and have been shooting it pretty much exclusively for the last couple but recently picked up a used S&W and am going to give ICORE a try this year and maybe dust off the 1911 and do a couple of IDPA matches also. Probably be horrible as ever but it will still be a great way to spend a Saturday afternoon.
__________________
Government is like a baby. An alimentary canal with a big appetite at one end and no sense of responsibility at the other. - Ronald Reagan
hounddawg is offline  
Old March 2, 2012, 03:34 PM   #8
Don P
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 17, 2005
Location: Florida
Posts: 4,825
Carry on as is. Enjoy it, have a good time and remember the one person you have to out shoot is yourself. My main objective is to complete the match NOT BEING DQ'ED! Shooting the best match of your life and being DQ'ed on the last stage means nothing but being DQ'ed. All else goes in the trash. Just my take on it and if you have a bad stage, leave it and move on.

Above all you have to have fun while shooting the match regardless of the level of the match.

In closing its dam addictive ain't it????
__________________
NRA Life Member, NRA Range Safety Officer, IDPA Safety Officer, USPSA NROI Range Officer
As you are, I once was, As I am, You will be.
Don P is offline  
Old March 2, 2012, 09:39 PM   #9
hounddawg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 1, 2009
Posts: 760
wrong thread apologies
__________________
Government is like a baby. An alimentary canal with a big appetite at one end and no sense of responsibility at the other. - Ronald Reagan
hounddawg is offline  
Old March 3, 2012, 10:11 PM   #10
lashlaroe
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 20, 2010
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 180
Glad you had fun shooting your first match. That is the most important thing IMO. I really can't add anything to the advice above. Just wanted to give you kudos for getting out there and doing it.
__________________
Mike

As much as I believe that there is good in every person, I'm not so naive as to think that all people are essentially good. Evil and evil people exist. Deny that fact at your own risk.
lashlaroe is offline  
Old March 16, 2012, 01:07 AM   #11
chills1994
Member
 
Join Date: July 14, 2005
Posts: 29
do a google search for " IDPA classifier tips"

Collins County IDPA has a pretty good webpage of advice on how to shoot it better.

There is also a really good thread on one of the 1911 forums.
chills1994 is offline  
Old March 21, 2012, 04:13 PM   #12
bitttorrrent
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 21, 2011
Location: Chicago
Posts: 678
I might try my first match this weekend in new buffalo, mi.

What do i need to do? I can register IDPA on website and I have either my new Caracal F(can get a holster from my Dad) or PX4 (with holster).

Do I need to do a qualifier course? Contact the club?

Have not shot a match since a was 12 and shot on a junior nra rifle club.
bitttorrrent is offline  
Old March 21, 2012, 07:16 PM   #13
CatsEye
Member
 
Join Date: July 15, 2010
Location: Clarksville, TN
Posts: 35
You don't need to be a member to shoot your first match. Make sure you have all your equipment (gun, holster, mag pouch, mags and ammo) and hit the range. When you get there tell them you are a new shooter and they will go over the basics. Listen to what they say and don't get in a hurry. Your main goal the first time is to be safe and get a feel for how things work.
__________________
Music City Tactical Shooters
CatsEye is offline  
Old March 22, 2012, 09:16 AM   #14
Don P
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 17, 2005
Location: Florida
Posts: 4,825
Quote:
What do i need to do? I can register IDPA on website and I have either my new Caracal F(can get a holster from my Dad) or PX4 (with holster).

Do I need to do a qualifier course? Contact the club?
First you need to just show up at the match. You will shoot what ever gun division your handgun fits into.
You will shoot as a unclassified shooter.
You can become a member of the IDPA if you choose after your second match. Some clubs will let you shoot as many matches as you wish without being a member.
If you like the discipline and become a member then you can shoot a classifier match
Equipment needed, holster that fits your belt and if you have it a magazine pouch that hold 2 magazines or 2 single magazine pouches.
IF you DO NOT have magazine pouches don't fret over it you can use your pants pockets.
__________________
NRA Life Member, NRA Range Safety Officer, IDPA Safety Officer, USPSA NROI Range Officer
As you are, I once was, As I am, You will be.
Don P is offline  
Old March 23, 2012, 10:28 AM   #15
mrvco
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 1, 2011
Posts: 214
I shot my first IDPA match a few weeks ago... it was a good time and not nearly as intimidating as I thought it would be after reading the rule book and some of the forum posts. It was certainly not nearly as humbling as my first steel match the following weekend Regardless, I highly recommend participating in either or both formats.
mrvco is offline  
Old April 25, 2012, 03:14 PM   #16
Gryff
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 6, 2007
Posts: 150
Dry fire at home and practice on:
  • a smooth but rapid drawing with minimal extra movement
  • rapid acquisition of the front sight after the draw
  • smooth and quick transitions between targets
  • reloads

At the range, learn the rhythm of your gun during rapid fire (if possible). Also practice to reset your trigger quickly without letting it all the way out. A smooth trigger press during rapid shooting is critical, so you want to avoid beating on it and causing your gun to move more than necessary. Getting your body to learn and use the reset point of your trigger (rather than the full take-up) helps with this.

You don't have to shoot it like a laser-aimed machine gun, but you do need to try to recognize and eliminate inefficiencies in your movement, focus on that front sight, and press the trigger smoothly. Do this, and it is pretty easy to jump from Marksman to Sharpshooter.

Quote:
do a google search for " IDPA classifier tips"
http://www.downrange.tv/blog/quest-f...reakdown/5576/
Gryff is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:09 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.10512 seconds with 9 queries