The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting > Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old April 17, 2012, 01:12 PM   #1
Pond, James Pond
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 12, 2011
Location: Top of the Baltic stack
Posts: 2,680
Casting bullets and the associated data needed.

I'm getting closer to choosing and ordering my reloading materials as I find more and more places to get the parts I need.
In fact, I am now down to choosing where to buy from rather than how to buy.

It looks like I may also be getting some casting materials: buying trashed lead wheel weights should be easy enough, and I can buy some molds, and the savings would be huge!

At the moment I have found online .430 300gr RN molds and some .430 240gr SWC molds, as well as 158gr SWC .356 molds for my .38. These would suit my range, SD and woods needs amply.

My question is where might I find reloading data for these bullets. They are not amongst the listed types in my Lymans 49th Edition.

Is 300 grs of .430 round nose to be backed up with the same powder charge as a 300 gr #429650 Linotype?

My guess is not because I see 300gr JSP on the opposite page with different charges of the same powder.
Same with 240 gr: 3 bullet types listed and 3 different charges.

So how do I know?
__________________
You cannot wake someone who is pretending to sleep. Stop pretending. Wake up.
Freedom: Please enjoy responsibly.
Pond, James Pond is online now  
Old April 18, 2012, 12:07 AM   #2
Stick_man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 18, 2008
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
Posts: 241
James, a great place to start is the Lyman Cast Bullet Handbook (either #3 or #4). You could also check your powder manufacturer's website for load data. If your moulds are Lee Precision products, they should show up in the Lee reloading manuals.

You are correct in the observation that you should not use JHP load data for cast bullets. Cast bullets actually derive lower pressures to achieve the same velocities, but generally are not driven to max velocity for a given caliber (issues with leading and accuracy). Also, the size and shape of the bullet will determine how deep you have to seat them to be able to properly chamber in your gun. Seating depth greatly influences chamber pressure.

There is lots of information available throughout the internet web. Places to check out (or names to search for) besides this forum are the Cast Bullet Association, LASC, CastBoolits.gunloads.com, Lead Bullet Technology (LBT) and Glenn Fryxell and Veral Smith. Searching those references will provide you with weeks worth of reading and more valuable information than you could purchase anywhere at any cost.

One word of caution about reloading and casting your own... it is VERY addictive. You won't save money, but you will be able to shoot a lot more for the same amount of money spent.

Happy casting and welcome to the addiction!
Stick_man is offline  
Old April 18, 2012, 07:38 AM   #3
reloader28
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 13, 2009
Location: nw wyoming
Posts: 924
Manuals cant possibly list every bullet in every weight. Therefore, you can use data for the aproximate weights. Sometimes you will never find your bullets weight in a manual. That dont mean you cant load them. Use the closest listed loads.

A 300gr is a 300gr. The shape of the nose can make a big difference in pressure sometimes, but you should never start at max anyway.

You can use jacketed data for cast bullets, but dont use cast data for jacketed bullets. Like the Stick Man said, cast bullets make less pressure.

Go to the castboolits.gunloads.com site. It's excellent. Alot of us are over there too. You will learn stuff EVERY time you read there.
reloader28 is offline  
Old April 18, 2012, 09:56 AM   #4
grandpajoe
Member
 
Join Date: June 10, 2011
Posts: 53
Quote:
Go to the castboolits.gunloads.com site. It's excellent.
I whole heartily agree. I started casting about 18 months ago and didn't have a clue about any of it, I found a wealth of information on that site. Below is the link.

www.castboolits.com
grandpajoe is offline  
Old April 18, 2012, 02:33 PM   #5
Pond, James Pond
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 12, 2011
Location: Top of the Baltic stack
Posts: 2,680
Thanks for the pointers folks!!

I foresee some extensive reading coming up!!
__________________
You cannot wake someone who is pretending to sleep. Stop pretending. Wake up.
Freedom: Please enjoy responsibly.
Pond, James Pond is online now  
Old April 18, 2012, 08:39 PM   #6
Stick_man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 18, 2008
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
Posts: 241
Just don't rush things. It is better to spend a little more time learning things than to rush into it and end up getting severely hurt (or worse). Lots of people have made mistakes along the way and are offering up words of wisdom gained from thier mistakes.

I was lurking in the shadows of several forums for a couple years, reading and learning all I could, before I finally cast my first "boolit". Been reloading for close to 40 years now but casting for only a short time.

If there ever was a place to get a PhD in boolit casting, it would have to be at CastBoolits.com. The other places offer great background information and understudy work, but the wealth of knowledge shared at CastBoolits is second to none. This forum is also a good source of knowledge, but it excells more in the general firearms information.

Happy casting!
Stick_man is offline  
Old April 21, 2012, 06:28 PM   #7
dagger dog
Member
 
Join Date: September 5, 2010
Posts: 53
Most guns won't shoot all bullets accurately nor will all bullets work in some guns.

Why not accumulate your lead, and equipment and while doing that try some different styles and size bullets in the general range of the types you like.

Bullet to barrel ,cylinder throat,and chamber fit are crucial,along with weight,length to barrel twist specs. Some designs work better for auto-single shot pistols and some are better with revolvers.

Study a lot cast a little, gain knowledge as you progress,and you won't be buying molds just to trade them off because they didn't work.

If in doubt about charge weight to bullet weight, always opt out for the next heavier bullet for the same charge weight, and always use the data for jacketed if the bullet weights are the same,jacketed vs lead.

Lee Modern Reloading Second Edition (revised) is worth the few bucks that it costs.

Last edited by dagger dog; April 21, 2012 at 07:08 PM.
dagger dog is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.08495 seconds with 9 queries