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Old April 7, 2012, 05:05 PM   #1
Nap12005
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Winchester 1892 .32-20 SN#8624

I inherited a Winchester model 1892 about a year ago, but I just looked into what kind of treasure it really is. I've done a ton of internet research and the differences in price between websites and guns is very confusing. I have called and talked to several gun dealers/buyers and they all told me look on the internet. From what I gathered the gun is in good condition. Although, I don't know how to measure the percentage of original blueing and stock.

The rifle is a Winchester model 1892 with a 4 digit SN#, which would make it a first year model. It is the basic sporting rifle in .32-20 caliber. It has a 24" full octagon barrel and has original front and rear sights as far as I can tell and many of the markings which identify it from that year. It does have some rust but it is a light dust with no apparent pitting. There is also some evidence that the screws in the receiver have been removed since the rest of the gun aged. The action functions very smoothly and the gun fires true.

I am hoping somebody can help me narrow down the value of this particular Winchester, or can at least point me in the direction of someone that can. I have several photos and will email them upon request.

Thanks,
NEIL
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Old April 7, 2012, 08:34 PM   #2
gunsmokeTPF
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First of all, you should contact the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody Wyoming and get a letter, which will indicate from winchester's original records exactly when the gun was manufactured and it's original configuration. They may also be able to tell you to whom it was shipped. I got a letter last year for a '97 winchester riot and it cost $60. It's certainly cheap enough when you think about all the guess work you'll be elliminating and in my case stopped people from questioning me as to whether, or not it was an original riot shotgun.

Don't assume the year your rifle was made by it's serial number according to the Blue Book, or any other source. I have an 1892 SRC, 44-40, trapper, 17" barrel with a serial# in the 88,000 range. That would indicate it was made in 1894, but not so. My letter indicated it was born in 1898. Like I said, never assume.

As far as your description regarding it's condition is concerned, you really gave a non description. Condition is almost everything. Pictures would certainly help, but without documentation and actually holding it in your hand you can only be given a vague guess as to it's value. As far as sending photos you can post them here, but I don't even know how to do that and have my own photos as well that I'd like to post, but when I try it keeps coming back too large. I've seen guns with as little as 10% less original finish sell for thousands of dollars less. Check things out the correct way. Lots of luck and Happy Easter.

Last edited by gunsmokeTPF; April 7, 2012 at 08:43 PM.
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Old April 12, 2012, 01:19 AM   #3
Nap12005
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Right on thanks. Now for question number two. How should I take care of this gun. Everywhere I read says don't touch it because your going to ruin it. I'm not so much trying to sell it as keep it in the family. I have always kept my guns rust free, lightly oiled and in a case, but from what I've read all that is a no, no with this gun. Pretty much all of the blueing is gone and a grey looking "patina" is all that's left. If I hadn't done my research I would have redone the whole thing. I would like to preserve my gun in the best way possible. Any suggestions?

Thanks,
NEIL
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Old April 12, 2012, 09:04 AM   #4
PetahW
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What I would do is rub the metal down with a rough cloth soaked in oil until the surface rustdust is mostly gone, wipe it dry with a soft/clean cloth - then treat wood & metal with Howard's Feed 'N Wax, following the bottle directions.

.
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Old April 12, 2012, 03:56 PM   #5
Nap12005
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Yes, I understand and agree about pictures and first hand contact with the gun. Everyone is telling me to contact Buffalo Bills in Wyoming, so I guess I should take the advise I asked for. Here are some pictures. I'd like to hear you folkses opinion about my baby. I could only post 6 pictures. If you would like something better or different I'll get them posted or can email them to you as soon as I can. Thanks for your time and input.

NEIL

This fine piece of American weaponry, innovation, and beauty was given to me in what I think to be remarkable condition for being over a hundred years old. It has Original parts and sights, few nicks, and surprisingly, rust is near non-existent. I think this gun is a fine example of American craftsmanship and our focus on quality. This repeating Winchesters' action functions smooth as new and she shoots as straight today as I'm sure she did in 1893 when she first came off the line to keep varmints from the hen house and maybe a little meat in the locker. Yes, I may have a biased opinion, but please tell me what you think.


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Old April 13, 2012, 08:44 AM   #6
PetahW
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It's a Model 1892 Rifle, and not a Model 1892 Carbine - much nicer to have IMHO.

IMO, the receiver finish has turned into a patina - so I would simply keep it oiled, and wax the stocks.

.
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Old April 13, 2012, 04:53 PM   #7
Scorch
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Your Winchester 1892 rifle has ample light surface pitting and corrosion, not unusual for working guns. In 32-20 (32 WCF), with an octagon barrel and relatively nice wood, an 1892 rifle is worth around $600-$1000. Being a pre-1898 gun and first year gun might add another $200-$300 to that.
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Old April 13, 2012, 08:03 PM   #8
gunsmokeTPF
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That rifle could very well be a 1st, or 2nd year production and like what was already mentioned any pre '98 brings a premium. It's been around the block a few times, but from what I can see it's not in bad shape. We should all look that good at 120 years old. From what I was able to see I think you even still have the elevator with your buckhorn rear sight. Lots of times they're missing. I would've liked to have seen the front sight and entire butt as well, but that letter from Cody is very important in order to determine the value.

Museums use oooo steel wool and oil to clean off rust and grit without removing the finish from items like guns and swords, but I wouldn't be aggressive with the cleaning at this time. Believe it, or not oil is not a preservative, but a lubricant. I've seen rust develop in areas where there's been an oil build up. Wipe it down with a moderately oiled rag to remove any gunk. Then wipe down real good with a soft clean cloth before finally giving it a going over with a silicon cloth and send a cleaning rod down that barrel.

Worry about value when you have all it's info. Those 92's are great and you're very lucky to have gotten one as old as that, cause those aren't seen every day. If it's ever shot it'll almost feel like shooting a .22. Since the bore is narrow the barrel will be heavier than other calibres thus reducing recoil as well. If you have it lettered please let me know and if possible post a full length photo. I wish it was mine.
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Old April 15, 2012, 02:47 AM   #9
natman
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Quote:
Believe it, or not oil is not a preservative, but a lubricant. I've seen rust develop in areas where there's been an oil build up.
I'm going to go with NOT on this one.

Oil works just fine to prevent rust, some better than others. Try Break Free Collector, it's an excellent rust preventative. Other good ones are LPS3 and Ezzox.
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Old April 15, 2012, 02:30 PM   #10
gunsmokeTPF
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Natman, I've seen more than a few guns that developed rust and gook where every day run of the mill oil had a build up deposited in it's channels. I've even seen it happen to tools. I can't change what I've seen and that's just my experience.

I'll give you a great example of what oil can do. A friend of mine has a beautiful German Weatherby MKV .270. Back in the 60's he stuck a banded front sight on it for reasons I won't bother getting into. Around 10 years ago he attempted to remove it by himself and couldn't. He brought it to a gunsmith who did the job. He always oiled that gun, profusely, but for some strange reason rust formed near the edge and just barely under the band preventing it from sliding back off. Now his once mint condition rifle has a double ring around the collar. It's a mystery where that rust came from.

The items you're recommending is more than just oil. I think Hoppe's uses a much simpler formula for their oil. As a matter of fact read the adds that you've displayed. I think I saw something about man made and not petroleum based. I guess we can call anything oil today. I'm not that sophisticated and certainly haven't had much interest in keeping up with new products that pop up every day. I use what's worked very well for me over the years and haven't damaged a single gun yet.

Please cut me just a little slack on this. I use oil on my guns as well for lubricating moving parts and even wipe the entire gun down with just a very small amount. But if I'm going to store it away for a long period of time I'd use silicon. There's no way in hell I'd ever stick a $6000 Winchester Model21 away after wiping it down with just an oily rag for a very long time. I'm no scientist and certainly not an oil expert, so people can do whatever they want.
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