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Old March 26, 2012, 09:47 AM   #1
hammered54
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Match Primers

given the choice between the two ..reg. primer or a match primer at or near the same price??
just what is the big difference ?

went to restock my primer supply yesterday and all they had where "match primers " only a bit more in price ($0.50 per 100 ).....can they be substituted with no effect on the basic load ?

Matt.
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Old March 26, 2012, 10:09 AM   #2
RobertInIowa
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Probably. Match primers are supposed to provide a more consistant ignition and burn rate. You may notice a difference, but in most cases it would be an improvement. Best reloading practice would be to back your load off 10% and work back up.
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Old March 26, 2012, 12:59 PM   #3
CS86
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Quote:
given the choice between the two ..reg. primer or a match primer at or near the same price??
just what is the big difference ?
I was wondering the same thing. I ended up buying some match federal primers for my 308. This is the first time I have bought new winchester brass and is the first time i'm reloading for the 308. One experience I really didn't like is that the match primers seated really hard into the new brass. Some you would see shavings around the primer, some I had to reprime.

Is this common? I wasn't sure if it was because the brass hadn't been fired once before? I had large federal primers (not match) that I put into the 22-250 cases that seated fine.
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Old March 26, 2012, 01:15 PM   #4
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Quote:
went to restock my primer supply yesterday and all they had where "match primers " only a bit more in price ($0.50 per 100 ).....can they be substituted with no effect on the basic load ?
I am not sure UncleNick did a nice post on the difference on primers, you may want to do a search for that posting.

I have never had ignition problems with the primers I use, Winchester or CCI. I personally don't think they are worth the extra cost, but I don't shoot matches, now match bullets that's a different story.

Jim
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Old March 26, 2012, 01:57 PM   #5
mrawesome22
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The "big" difference is that the match primers compound is mixed by the guys that have worked there the longest and have the most experience.

You would think they have recipies using measuring cups and what not, so experience wouldn't matter.

Anyway, anytime you switch you are supposed to reduce charge 10% and work back up. This includes LOT NUMBER also.

If you find a primer your load likes, match or not, try to buy as much of that lot number as you can.

Last edited by mrawesome22; March 26, 2012 at 01:59 PM. Reason: spellering
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Old March 26, 2012, 04:59 PM   #6
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Here something on primers


http://riflemansjournal.blogspot.com...mer-study.html
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Old March 26, 2012, 05:13 PM   #7
Bart B.
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I asked a rep from Federal some years ago about their match grade primers. He said that they will test a bunch of primers from a fresh lot off the assembly line and those that produce the lowest muzzle velocity spread will be dubbed "Match" and so labeled and marketed. He didn't say what type of gun they were fired in.

The reason is the putty-like primer compound is hand-mixed by people using a paddle on a flat surface much like a person making fudge on a huge granite slab. As the person uses his paddle to fold, mix, spread, then do that again in all directions, the mix of components get uniformly distributed in the "slurry" as it's called. This process is "black magic" in nature as a certain knack of making the slurry as uniform as possible throughout its mass is difficult, but possible.

Next, the slurry is spread into little cup shaped holed in a plate where they dry. Then those pellets are put in a primer cup, a sealer's put on top of the pellet and finally an anvil is pressed in place atop the sealer.

The primers are tested for ignition specs by putting one in a primed case then chambering it in a test barrel and test firing them with a range of firing pin impact forces. Finally they're tested for uniformity.
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Old March 26, 2012, 05:33 PM   #8
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Better and more consistancy in match. Won't waste my time on the others.
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Old March 26, 2012, 05:58 PM   #9
CS86
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Quote:
I ended up buying some match federal primers for my 308. This is the first time I have bought new winchester brass and is the first time i'm reloading for the 308. One experience I really didn't like is that the match primers seated really hard into the new brass. Some you would see shavings around the primer, some I had to reprime.

Is this common? I wasn't sure if it was because the brass hadn't been fired once before? I had large federal primers (not match) that I put into the 22-250 cases that seated fine.
I was hoping to get some comments on this. Is it common to have primers seat hard in new brass or just winchester brass? has anyone else had problems with the federal match large rifle primers? Trying to understand this more as a beginner.
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Old March 26, 2012, 06:36 PM   #10
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For what it's worth, the favorite primer for top high power rifle competitors are those sold by Wolff that are made in Russia. They keep nearly forever and don't degrade over a few years like most others do. And they're uniform enough to win the matches and set the records. Some folks prefer the magnum large rifle primers over the standard ones for the .308 Win.; it does work very well indeed.
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Old March 26, 2012, 07:24 PM   #11
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Quote:
For what it's worth, the favorite primer for top high power rifle competitors are those sold by Wolff that are made in Russia.
I conducted my own primer test of Tula 7.62, supposed to be a mil spec primer, and Wolf.

I tested every primer I had in the 30-06 with 174FMJ's 47.0 grains IMR 4895 and LC62 match cases.

The Russian primers gave me some of my best groups and the Standard Deviations and Extreme Spreads for 10 shot groups were very good.

These primers gave me a little less velocity than the American primers.

I think they are worth trying.

I understand CCI Benchrest have more quality control checks, down to weighing each primer, than any other American primer. I do know a number of excellent shooters who use CCI Benchrest.
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Old March 26, 2012, 08:32 PM   #12
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I shot the same load in a custom 270WSM using Fed 215M and Fed 215 and running those loads over a 35 Oehler Chronograph I got 2fps difference. I load at the range and I change primers working up loads. All my loads are for hunting or varmint rifles.

As the the OP question I use a hand priming tool and each priming tool I have is set up for case head/primer size so the one I use for 22-250/30-06 etc never get change. My primers go in square some on new cases may be little tight is all.
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Old March 26, 2012, 08:41 PM   #13
Bart B.
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Slamfire comments:
Quote:
I understand CCI Benchrest have more quality control checks, down to weighing each primer, than any other American primer.
I doubt weighing primers are worthwhile. How much of the total weight is part of the metal parts and how much is the priming pellet?

Depends on what each set of parts weigh. And I don't think one will take the primer apart to weigh just the priming pellet that detonates when squished between the anvil and bottom of the primer cup. A large rifle primer has more weight in its metal parts than the pellet. The pellet weighs less than on grain and the rest of the primer weighs about 5 to 7 grains. So it's going to be difficult to weigh just the pellet and note 10% or so weight differences.
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Old March 27, 2012, 08:17 AM   #14
hammered54
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so it sounds like its more of a QC issue above all else.
for the little price difference there was I'll pick them up next time,

thanks for all the input....and the link (interesting).

Matt.
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