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Old January 13, 2012, 09:41 PM   #1
piratecountry
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Springfield Armory Model of 1922

I posted this several years ago but wasn't able to post pictures. Thanks to my 11 year old, we can post pics. Papa shot this rifle on some Navy teams during WWII, and after, and I have it now. I have seen several online and one in person but never one with a stock like this. Any history people could give me would be nice, as well as a value for insurance reasons. Is it worth anything at all??

SDC13985.jpg

SDC13990.jpg

SDC13992.jpg
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Old January 13, 2012, 09:45 PM   #2
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More picturesSDC13988.jpg
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Old January 13, 2012, 11:32 PM   #3
Jim Watson
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Between the wars, Springfield Armory made .22 rifles like that for training and target shooting. There were three models, the 1922, the 1922 M1, and the 1922 M2.
Papa's is the first of the series, the 1922 and the least common of the group.
They made 2020 1922s from 1922-1924.
Unfortunately for the collector value, Papa's has a replacement barrel made in April 1936 and a home checkering job on the stock.

There is one for sale at:
http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...Item=268143953
You could track it to see what it sells for.
Papa's would be worth less because of the changes.

I would put the insurance premiums into a gun safe and lock it up.
Insurance money would not replace Papa's rifle.
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Old January 14, 2012, 08:56 AM   #4
piratecountry
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Thanks for the info Mr Watson. As I posted, the stock always threw me off with the checkering. It is well done and looked original. I remember him letting me shoot it when I was 7 or so and I remember the trigger going off before I was ready. I learned early what a good trigger was and how much easier it was to hit with. It was a world of difference from the rifles my dad had let me shoot. Made an impression on me then. Of the 60+ firearms I have, still my favorite. 10-4 on the safe. Took care of that 11 years ago when I built my house.

A quick boring story. When I was on my high school rifle team, I used it for a little while. During practice one day, a man was there that told me he had been involved with the league for a while and the officials weren't going to let me use it in the meets due to it not being conventional. When we wound up at the district meet, there was a boy there that had one like mine. He schooled all of us. His coach was the helpful man that told me it wouldn't be allowed.
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Old January 16, 2012, 03:36 AM   #5
gyvel
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Quote:
Unfortunately for the collector value, Papa's has a replacement barrel made in April 1936 and a home checkering job on the stock.
Additiionally, someone removed the knurled cocking knob from the striker. (Although that is a replaceable part.)
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Old January 17, 2012, 06:25 PM   #6
Jim Watson
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Ectually, old chap, the original 1922 had a headless cocking piece like the National Match 1903 of the day. This one is correct.
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Old February 10, 2012, 05:49 PM   #7
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I am new at collection the 1922s and have a lot to learn but this rifle may have more value than at first glance. More pictures would help but it looks to have the original 1922 long magazine. Is the bolt a 1922 with the dual pin? The stock would bother me but the NRA stock without the grooves was designed with the thought in mind that many sold to NRA members would be checkered. The barrel does not help and I can't tell much about the finish.
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Old March 24, 2012, 10:07 PM   #8
gyvel
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Ectually, old chap, the original 1922 had a headless cocking piece like the National Match 1903 of the day. This one is correct.
Cool! I never knew that. Thanks!
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