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Old March 9, 2012, 03:58 PM   #1
kfunk
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marlin glenfield 60

i have a 1971 glenfield marlin 60 (with the squirrel on the stock). after a good thorough cleaning it will fire about 70 rounds, no problems. after that it starts to jam up. the bullet gets caught on the edge of the chamber and the bullet and casing get cockeyed to each other, rending the bullet useless and requiring messing with it to clear it.

i'm curious if i were to buy a new bolt and trigger/action assembly if they would install in my existing receiver/stock.

has anyone tried this?

my main concern is that the 1971 model uses screws to attach the trigger/action assembly and i'm pretty sure the modern ones use pins.

thanks in advance!
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Old March 9, 2012, 04:12 PM   #2
Scorch
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The problem with the feeding on your rifle is most likely that the feed lips are worn, bent, or dirty. Last time I fixed one, parts were around $10, labor was around $30.

Replacing the trigger with a later version of the trigger will not work.

If you start removing and replacing parts until you get it right, you will likely spend more than the rifle is worth. New, they cost right around $120, used around $50-$75. If yours doesn't work right, have it fixed, or trade it for a newer one.
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Old March 9, 2012, 04:45 PM   #3
BigPoppa
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I have the same rifle, looking at it brings back a lot of good childhood memories. My rifle still functions as it did when it was new and I am thankful for that. I have many other guns but this one is the one I used to hunt small game with when I was a teenager and has a lot of sentimental value. My dad bought it new for $40 many moons ago.
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Old March 9, 2012, 04:49 PM   #4
jmr40
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I have 2 of them of that same era sitting in the back of a safe. They have been single shots for about 20 years now. Not worth the expense of getting them fixed to me.

Part of the problem with at least one of mine is a worn out magazine tube. Lot of fond memories of them growing up, but I got my money's worth out of them long ago.
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Old March 9, 2012, 08:02 PM   #5
tahunua001
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I had the same problem with an older M60 of my own. the closest thing to a fix I ever found was either staying with federal and CCI ammo or carrying a can of remoil/ballastol with me. I could be wrong but hte little brother that now owns it has new recoil springs and after a short breakin says it runs fine.
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Old March 10, 2012, 08:14 AM   #6
PawPaw
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Marlin sold zillions of those little rifles and they're great shooters. In my experience, they're easily gunsmithed by the home tinkerer, really simple little actions. When I experience feeding problems the first thing I do is give the rifle a good cleaning. The second thing I do is look at problems with the magazine spring. Dirt and crud in the magazine tube will accumulate over time, and springs wear out. If the spring isn't giving good pressure to feed the rounds into the action you'll have trouble.

There is a good tutorial on breakdown on these little rifles. The home tinkerer should be aware that after making over 11 million of these rifles, there have been design or manufacturing changes over the years, but that tutorial should give you a good start.
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Old March 10, 2012, 09:18 PM   #7
TriumphGuy
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Get yourself a new set of springs as mentioned and a recoil buffer. After 40 years, it's about due.
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