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Old February 19, 2012, 03:46 PM   #26
bamiller
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Not meaning to hijack this post but since I'm relatively new to reloading I have to ask. Why all the variance from manuals to manuals listed in this post? Read anywhere from 4.0 to 5.7 thus far. Couldn't that be dangerous or is the 1.7 difference not that big of a deal?
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Old February 19, 2012, 04:01 PM   #27
Sure Shot Mc Gee
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I have a older reloaders guide from Alliant Powder dated 1995. Looking at the pistol 45 acp charge listed with Bullseye powder being used? It states 5.4-grs. max charge for FMJ 230 gr.. It also states 4.0 grains of Bullseye to be used for a Cast 230 gr. bullet too. Judging by that info I would say pressures will be up some but not near enough to blow your weapon up because of mag primer usage. I would say its pretty safe to shoot those you already made. I haven't bought a rifle or pistol store bought shell since 1970. Been a reloader all my life. You name the animal I've probably hunted it. And that goes for ammo too. You name it? I probably reloaded it too. Good Luck SSMcG

Quote:
Not meaning to hijack this post but since I'm relatively new to reloading I have to ask. Why all the variance from manuals to manuals listed in this post? Read anywhere from 4.0 to 5.7 thus far. Couldn't that be dangerous or is the 1.7 difference not that big of a deal?
Answer:
1.7 difference: Depends on cartridge case overall capacity. And the burning speed of the powder. I've notice over the years pretty much all marketed Reloading Manuals are about? down 10% from a true max load. Doing so keeps them out of Court and the Reloader out of the Emergency Room. That's why the older reloading guys build up their loads until finding that one perfect load that shoots exceptionally well out of their rifle or handgun. And on the other hand knowing when to stop looking for more speed!! Comes from experience. Most of us Old Timers have that ability to judge whats safe and whats on the edge of being dangerous!-- With experience and experimentation sometimes you can get that perfect match between a high energy fast load with one powder / and a low power load for tightest grouping with another powder. If both recipes are done correctly? the shooter will not have to re-site his firearm to shoot either. (as their interchangeable) I've done it for a couple of handgun cartridges I shoot. Oh some will argue it can't be done because of Arch in speeds? Some say going beyond whats listed is taboo. Only thing I got to say to that!! "You had better have spent a few years at the reloading bench and in knowing how to read fired brass and their primers!! Before trying to experiment bumping powder charges on anything." Hope the info helps.

Last edited by Sure Shot Mc Gee; February 20, 2012 at 03:38 PM.
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Old February 19, 2012, 06:08 PM   #28
dunerjeff
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BAMILLER = the differences generally come from all the different test barrels, test conditions at that time, seating debths, bullets shapes and profiles.The list goes on. Basically no two companies use the exact same components or prcedures as the other. Not Every barrel or test jig is the same so a load that is max in one barrel may be good for another grain of powder in another. That is why most people do have several load manuals from whatever bullets or powder they use, so as to get a resonable "average" of min-max.
It is best to try and use the data that was tested using the very bullet that you are using so it has that bullets length figured in for oal. And why it is important to always start low and work up, watching for pressure signs.
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Last edited by dunerjeff; February 20, 2012 at 07:06 AM. Reason: inserted the word "Not"
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Old February 19, 2012, 06:37 PM   #29
Lost Sheep
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Magnum v Standard primers

First of all, amen to Dunerjeff's post (#28) except sentence #4 which begins "Every barrel...", but I think should begin "Not every barrel...". Every experiment has some variation and give slightly different results (that's why they are called experiments). Note the different firearms used by the different testers. 45 ACP testing tend to use 1911s almost exclusively, but .357 magnums get tested in a WIDE variety of barrels, from out-and-out laboratory test barrels to 8 3.8" Smiths, to 4" Rugers, though rarely shorter. The labs also have different safety criteria, probably decided by the agenda of the payer of the bills (powder manufacture, loading equipment manufacturer, bullet manufacturer)

Magnum primers give a longer-lasting and probably larger flame than standard primers. They are used for powders that are hard to ignite where a standard primer might give a slow ignition to a cartridge, letting the pressure curve buildup be erratic (within that single cartridge, compromising safety or in relation to its sibling cartridges, contributing to inaccuracy).

Such hard-to-ignite powders are generally slow-burning, which are generally the best performers in the more powerful cartridges, hence the "Magnum" name.

Bullseye is an easy-to-ignite powder. While a standard primer will ignite Bullseye just fine, magnum powders add little to the ignition. Easy is easy. The difference in performance between standard vs magnum cartridges will be minimal with regard to the ignition.

The small pressure boost from the primer itself may drive the bullet out of the case by a little bit sooner than standard, but I don't expect it to be significant to the safety of the activity.

Remember: ALWAYS verify for yourself everything you learn. Believe only half of what you see and one quarter of what you hear. That goes double for everything you find on the internet (with the possible exception of the actual web sites of the bullet and powder manufacturers). This advice applies to my message as much as anything else and especially to personal load recipes. Hare-brained reloaders might have dangerous habits and even an honest typographical error could be deadly. I heard about a powder manufacturer's web site that dropped a decimal point once. It was fixed REAL FAST, but mistakes happen. I work in accounting and frequently hit "7" instead of "4" because the are next to each other on the keypad.

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Last edited by Lost Sheep; February 19, 2012 at 06:42 PM.
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Old February 19, 2012, 07:29 PM   #30
89blazin
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made a mistake with primers

Your thread title says "made a mistake with primers ", Good...you caught it! Now all you have to do is go back and fix it.
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Old February 19, 2012, 10:51 PM   #31
acb
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Thanks everyone for all the info I think my son and I will be on the bullet puller for a while this week I'd rather be safe than sorry . enjoyed reading all the stuff on here its been a good dicovery and big help.
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Old February 19, 2012, 11:01 PM   #32
TXGunNut
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Maybe I missed it somewhere acb but I've gotta ask, which primers did you use?
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Old February 20, 2012, 12:05 AM   #33
Sure Shot Mc Gee
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Quote:
Per ACB:Thanks everyone for all the info I think my son and I will be on the bullet puller for a while this week I'd rather be safe than sorry . enjoyed reading all the stuff on here its been a good dicovery and big help.
Per your circumstance in accidental use of Mag primers. You my friend are making a good decision by pulling there leads. "Never shoot ammo that is questionable. Not even your own." Reloading is not a topic or hobby that is easily learned. It takes time, patients, and attention to published written details to garner a safe and successful hobby. Be Safe. And enjoy your new pastime shared with your son. SSMcG
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Old February 20, 2012, 09:40 PM   #34
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I was using cci primers
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