The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old December 28, 2011, 10:13 AM   #1
TripHlx
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 10, 2011
Location: Greenville, SC
Posts: 110
Idea for component storage?

Hey guys, I had an idea and wanted to run it past some folks with some more experience. I had the thought of using a small dorm fridge to store opened powder containers and primers in.

I figured there is a possibility of it acting like a contained dehumidifier.

Anything I'm not aware of here? Other precautions that might be necessary? Out and out problems?

I happen to have one laying around not being used, so I thought this might be a good use for it, and a nice way to extend component life in the humid climate I live in.

Thanks guys!
__________________
"If you carry a gun, people will call you paranoid. That's ridiculous. If I have a gun, what in the hell do I have to be paranoid for." - Clint Smith
TripHlx is offline  
Old December 28, 2011, 11:15 AM   #2
Waldog
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 28, 2007
Location: SOCAL
Posts: 348
This may be of help. Found it on the Alliant powder website:

Considerations For Storage Of Smokeless Powder
Smokeless powder is intended to function by burning, so it must be protected against accidental exposure to flame, sparks or high temperatures.

For these reasons, it is desirable that storage enclosures be made of insulating materials to protect the powder from external heat sources.

Once smokeless powder begins to burn, it will normally continue to burn (and generate gas pressure) until it is consumed.

D.O.T. approved containers are constructed to open up at low internal pressures to avoid the effects normally produced by the rupture or bursting of a strong container.

Storage enclosures for smokeless powder should be constructed in a similar manner: 1. Of fire-resistant and heat-insulating materials to protect contents from external heat. 2. Sufficiently large to satisfactorily vent the gaseous products of combustion which would result if the quantity of smokeless powder within the enclosure accidentally ignited.

If a small, tightly enclosed storage enclosure is loaded to capacity with containers of smokeless powder, the enclosure will expand or move outwards to release the gas pressure - if the powder in storage is accidentally ignited.

Under such conditions, the effects of the release of gas pressure are similar or identical to the effects produced by an explosion.

Hence only the smallest practical quantities of smokeless powder should be kept in storage, and then in strict compliance with all applicable regulations and recommendations of the National Fire Protection Association (scroll down to read).

Recommendations For Storage Of Smokeless Powder
STORE IN A COOL, DRY PLACE. Be sure the storage area selected is free from any possible sources of excess heat and is isolated from open flame, furnaces, hot water heaters, etc. Do not store smokeless powder where it will be exposed to the sun's rays. Avoid storage in areas where mechanical or electrical equipment is in operation. Restrict from the storage areas heat or sparks which may result from improper, defective or overloaded electrical circuits.

DO NOT STORE SMOKELESS POWDER IN THE SAME AREA WITH SOLVENTS, FLAMMABLE GASES OR HIGHLY COMBUSTIBLE MATERIALS.
STORE ONLY IN DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION APPROVED CONTAINERS.
Do not transfer the powder from an approved container into one which is not approved.
DO NOT SMOKE IN AREAS WHERE POWDER IS STORED OR USED. Place appropriate "No Smoking" signs in these areas.
DO NOT SUBJECT THE STORAGE CABINETS TO CLOSE CONFINEMENT. STORAGE CABINETS SHOULD BE CONSTRUCTED OF INSULATING MATERIALS AND WITH A WEAK WALL SEAMS OR JOINTS TO PROVIDE AN EASY MEANS OF SELF-VENTING.
__________________
I am the Christian Conservative that CNN warned you about!!
Waldog is offline  
Old December 28, 2011, 02:16 PM   #3
JHLL
Member
 
Join Date: March 20, 2011
Posts: 40
First off... Great post TripHlx, I have an old fridge that I was thinking about painting up, and converting to a powder storage locker.

Second.... Informative post Waldog. My only question about the self venting unit is, the locking steel powder boxes they sell at cabelas, etc. are they self venting?

I'm not aiming at you Waldog, I know you just posted what Alliant powder site says.
JHLL is offline  
Old December 28, 2011, 08:51 PM   #4
Waldog
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 28, 2007
Location: SOCAL
Posts: 348
I think the SAAMI prefered method is a wood storage box with at least 1" thick walls. My loading bench is supported on a "lower Kitchen Cabinet" type box that is double thickness wood. It has a locking cabinet door. The door is "weak" so that it would vent. Actually a good yank would pull it off the hinges. Anyhow it will store at least 50 lbs powder. Primers are in a separate cabinet.

SAAMI states you can keep up to 50 lbs at home. However, your homeowners insurance and even your local Fire Marshall may say otherwise.

I would think that an NON OPERATING fridge would be an excellent storage container as long as it did not have the OLD STYLE locking latch. Friction doors on any fridge made since about 1965 would be ideal. It's insulated, doesn't easily burn and has a weak venting friction door. I wouldn't use a operating fridge as there would be moisture issues.

Sorry, don't know anything about Cabela's metal boxes. If it's for powder storage, Cabela's wouldn't sell it if it didn't meet SAAMI standards.
__________________
I am the Christian Conservative that CNN warned you about!!
Waldog is offline  
Old December 28, 2011, 09:11 PM   #5
dickttx
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 29, 2011
Location: Fort Worth
Posts: 494
Just a thought. The ice that builds up in a small refrigerator has to be caused by moisture getting inside.
My wife is a big believer in old chest type freezers for storage of horse feed, dog feed, garden stuff (pesticides, etc.), dry medicines and supplies for such animals, etc. Everytime we move I have to point out to her how much it will cost to move it, where will we put it, etc.
__________________
Education teaches you the rules, experience teaches you the exceptions (Plagiarized from Claude Clay)
dickttx is offline  
Old December 28, 2011, 11:52 PM   #6
kmaysob
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 9, 2011
Posts: 187
sounds like his idea is to use a non working fridge similar to what welders used to do for rod storage. i think it will work just fine, for an added measure of moisture protection, you might go to a local sporting goods store and pick up some desicant bags from the gun safe isle.
kmaysob is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.06812 seconds with 9 queries