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Old December 22, 2011, 10:30 PM   #1
Don P
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Chamfering a Revolver Cylinder

For any of our distinguished gun smiths. Does chamfering the cylinder to aid in reloading have any ill effect on the performance or allow any gases to possibly blow back due to the chamfering?. Possible cost if anyone is does this. Gun is a Ruger GP-100
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Old December 23, 2011, 01:12 PM   #2
Fleet
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All you're doing with chamfering really is just breaking the sharp edge. If done right, it won't have any effect on safety.
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Old December 23, 2011, 05:40 PM   #3
JohnKSa
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If you take a look at how much of the rear of the chamber is removed on some semi-autos to facilitate feeding, it will calm your fears about chamfering revolver chambers.

That said, there's no need to get carried away. Fleet is right, you're basically just taking the sharp edge off so nothing catches on it during a quick reload.
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Old December 23, 2011, 08:15 PM   #4
Don P
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Thanks Fleet and JohnKSa. Better to ask before than state as Curly would say
But Moe its an honest mistake! I'm a victom of circumstances! As the cartridge falls right through the cylinder and hits the floor
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Old December 24, 2011, 10:05 PM   #5
drail
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Try to avoid chamfering the extractor at all, just very lightly break the edges. You need that shoulder on the extractor to pull sticky cases out. Chamfer the chamber holes less than you think you need. It doesn't take much and you can always take a little more off. A little chamfer goes a long way. Use bullets with round noses.
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Old December 24, 2011, 11:33 PM   #6
James K
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Chamfering is usually used when the ammo has a sharp corner, like handloaded wadcutters, a Keith type SWC, or jacketed auto pistol rounds like .40 S&W where the mouth of the case tends to hang up on the edge of the chamber. For normal crimped revolver rounds it doesn't hurt, but serves no real purpose.

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Old December 27, 2011, 01:51 PM   #7
mkk41
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It does keep ya from scratching or shaving your cartridges while loading. On .22 revolvers it seems to have more of an advantage as it seems rims of .22 ammo aren't formed as sharp these days , and the waxy lube gets scrapes off and builds up.
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