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Old October 24, 2011, 09:03 PM   #1
Colorado Redneck
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Reforming .204 brass into 222 Rem Mag

The parent case for the .204 Ruger was the 222 Rem Magnum. Would reforming the .204 case back to the 222 Rem Mag be very difficult or even possible? And would it be possible to reform it to the original .222 Remington?

I bought a .204 Ruger, and after 250 rounds I am rethinking that decision. It only takes 15 or so rounds to foul the barrel to the point that getting a patch down the tube is pretty tough. (I am using Varget and Benchmark powders.) And it takes a lot of cleaning to get the barrel clean. The 22-250 I have will go 40 rounds or so before accuracy starts to suffer from fouling.

So, I am considering something else to fool around with for varmint shooting.

Any and all input is appreciated!
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Old October 24, 2011, 09:31 PM   #2
dunerjeff
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Before selling the 204 try polishing the bore.I do it with all my varmit/target guns.With a fine polishing compound on a cotton bore brush I run it up and down the barrel a couple dozen times to smooth all the rough marks that catch copper.When fending off praire dog assults I've shot 300 rounds through my 22-250 and .243 before I start seeing fouling accuracy issues.
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Old October 24, 2011, 10:13 PM   #3
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Polishing compound

dunerjeff--Is this process similar to "hand lapping" a barrel?

That would be a dandy solution, if it works! Do you have any suggestions for the polishing compound?

Thanks for the tip! I will investigate and after huntiing season is over, work on the rifle and report back.
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Old October 25, 2011, 04:55 AM   #4
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That is correct, I've used Flitz and some others that I got somewhere I don't know the name,but it is basically any fine(important)metal polish.Many gunshops or even hardware have little packets.I got some at Mills Fleet Farm also.
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Old October 25, 2011, 09:41 AM   #5
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I'm not getting the bit about the 204 fouling to the point you're loosing accuracy. I think its more with the rifle then the gun.

In a PD I go through several rounds, My 204 Ruger in Ruger #1 does't loose it. I use Benchmark and 32 gr. Hornady V-max.

I think I'd check the barrel of your rifle.
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Old October 25, 2011, 08:07 PM   #6
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Kraig

This rifle is interesting. I bought two boxes of Hornady ammo when I got the rifle. It shot (and still shoots) that Hornady stuff terribly. I finally concocted a round with Berger 35 gr. match bullets, Rem 7 1/2 primers, either Benchmark or Varget that shot pretty good groups off the bench (sub 1/2 inch.) I was using a Caldwell Creek shooting rest for testing and sighting in. So then to prairie dogs shooting. A few shots and all is well. then I can't hit a bull in the dareer. Take out the Savage 22-250 and bingo. Clean the .204 up, and a few shots are good, then same old deal. Back to the Savage and it is like cheating, it shoots so darn good. Triggers are very similar in nature. Glass is different, but not a contributor in this issue (to me). Most of the prairie dog shooting this summer was on government land where vehicle travel is prohibited, so I carried a bipod and shot off that all the time.

Yesterday I went to the range to check the sighting on a 25-06 for deer season, and took a Solo Lead Sled. (The shooter is susceptible to the old flincharoo.) Took the .204 to check it out. First few shots were very predictably close. Then the groups started to open up. It was cool with a slight breeze, and I was shooting three guns and only putting 2-3 rounds through each, then shooting the others. The barrels only got slightly warm. So out came the gun vise, and the cleaning stuff. As usual, the .204 swabs came out black as coal. Finally got it cleaned up. Same thing. Good groups, then not so good.

All of this said, I suppose the barrel could be responsible, but I am so ignorant that the odds of me diagnosing whats going on are slim to none.

So what would you check on the barrel, Kraig? Would you takeit to a smith?
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Old October 26, 2011, 05:37 AM   #7
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Colorado,

What kind of rifle did you get? If it is a barrel that poorly made why would you want to keep it and pay to fix the problem. I wouldn't think lapping would solve the problem, Would it?

cheers
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Old October 26, 2011, 08:26 AM   #8
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I would get the David Tubbs Finalfinish system and follow the direction.


http://www.davidtubb.com/ff-kit-204-cal
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Old October 26, 2011, 08:53 AM   #9
Brian Pfleuger
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Yeah, that's not the .204 cartridge that's prone to dirty barrels. I almost never clean the bore of my Ruger MkII in 204 and it shoots subMOA beyond 400 yards.

I'd agree with trying a bore polishing system.

Last edited by Brian Pfleuger; October 26, 2011 at 09:39 AM.
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Old October 26, 2011, 09:35 AM   #10
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There is nothing to lose by trying to polish that barrel, as it is already a prime candidate to hold up the tomatoes in the garden, by the sounds of it.

One other thing you might look at, is to make sure the bolt face isn't touching the barrel when it warms up a bit. I've seen that a few times, and just like your result, the first few go good, then its all over the place.
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Old October 26, 2011, 01:48 PM   #11
edward5759
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The 222 Remington Magnum was a wonderful cartridge
to shoot.
Won several bench matches with it in the 1960s.
don't give up so quick after all it is less expensive it shoot than other calibers.
Flitz works great if you are willing to work at it. With a wool mop you can't really hurt anything it will smooth out but it will take a while. the Tubbs Finalfinish is a good way to go and is a little easier, but do clean the heck out of that barrel each time you shoot. Follow the directions.
I had a friend of my Fathers back in the 1950s who would hand lap a barrels with special steels, just like you would hand lap the ways on a milling machine its a lost art and he was the only one I knew who could do it, outside of Belgium .

Don,t quit my friend
you'll find that 204 sweet spot

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Old October 26, 2011, 02:45 PM   #12
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I'd guess you've got a barrel that's coppered up. Get a good copper solvent and get it cleaned completely and then see what happens.
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Old October 26, 2011, 09:06 PM   #13
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Good suggestions and ideas

Thanks all for pitching in.

This rifle is a Remmy SPS Varmint. 26 inch barrel.

One thing is strange, and that is the "india ink" that comes out of on the patches when cleaning the barrel. Other rifles will have a black residue, but not nearly so much or after so few rounds.

Anyway, it is inexpensive to get the Tubbs Final Finish, and what the heck? It is more shooting. Also, there is a bottle of Barnes CR10 in the cabinet that should remove any copper buildup.

The gun has redeeming qualities, as it is not as loud as the 22-250, has a bit less recoil, and now it has a Timney trigger, and that is really nice. So more effort isn't that big of a deal. Dies, cases etc are already on the bench, as are several hundred Berger 35 gr. Match bullets. If the darn things would shoot consistently it would be enjoyable to pimp it up with a gaudy Richards Stock.

Thanks for the encouragment!
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Old October 27, 2011, 04:15 AM   #14
2_Grumpy
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Hi,

I don't want to go off topic or sound like a winchester salesman, but with today's quality of machining possible, hand lapping sounds so last century (1800's not 1900's).

Your rifle sounds like a new Caddy scrubbing out tires every month. Should there be a "Lemin Law"

Cheers
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Old October 27, 2011, 09:18 AM   #15
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broaches and reams always get worn and dull.How many barrels get sent down the line after the tooling is getting bad?I would also get 100 of say Hornady A-Max's or Sierra to try and see if they foul just as fast.Maybe Berger has softer copper that comes off at higher velocities?You never know
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Old October 27, 2011, 09:42 AM   #16
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Quote:
I don't want to go off topic or sound like a winchester salesman, but with today's quality of machining possible, hand lapping sounds so last century
Cutting tools leave marks behind, always have and always will.

Lapping smooths the tooling marks left.
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Old October 27, 2011, 08:08 PM   #17
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Tried various bullets

Loaded Nosler's, Barns Vamint Grenade, Hornady 32 gr. and 40 gr., and Sierra. Factory Hornady ammo shoot poorly, and every other bullet shot from fair to rotten. Bergers are the only bullet that groups.

So in the spirit of giving this firearm a fair shake, will do the Tubbs final finish and clean the bore with CR10 and keep after it for a while.

I am a conservationist at heart---every prairie dog I miss this year produces a few more for next year.

If that rifle is still in the safe in a couple of years and it doesn't shoot accurately, there should be plenty of time to fool around with other things, like taking it to the local gun smith for a check out. Since it no longer has the original factory trigger it won't go back to Remington as long as I own it.
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Old October 27, 2011, 08:33 PM   #18
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I hate Barnes bullets, but I love their copper solvent CR-10. Good, good stuff.

I also used the Tubb Final Finish in my 22-250Rem. They work also.

Just be sure to TAKE YOUR TIME and follow the directions to the T. If you follow the directions, it takes quite a while to get through the procedure, but well worth it. It will put a mirror like finish in your bore.
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