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Old January 5, 2011, 11:39 AM   #1
OscarTurner
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Remington 14-A how old?

These will be my new hunting buddies next year. The Winchester Model 12 is a 20-gauge and looks to be from 1936 and the Remington 14-A - I don't know when it was made.

I'm hoping to get the 20 gauge out to the field this weekend for dove. I'll take take the Remington to a gunsmith to have is checked before I order any ammo for it, but, if its up to the task, I'll take it out for white tails in the fall. I'm pretty curious about its age though. S/N is 87355 with the letter C stamped above it.




Remington 14-A




What is the "C" for?
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Old January 5, 2011, 11:59 AM   #2
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The Model 14 was made from 1913 to 1934, with 125,060 made. Yours would appear to fall somewhere in the late 1920s.
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Old January 9, 2011, 11:13 PM   #3
Mike Armstrong
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If the Remington model system for centerfires follows the system for rimfires, the "C" designates a pistol gripped stock (which yours has). Not sure what the 14-A designates. I know that the 14R is the carbine length model of the 14, and the 141 is the late "modernized" version with a fuller stock and a longer barrel. Some of those were made post WWII.

The earliest .30 cal 14s were marked ".30-30 Remington." Apparently that confused some people so Remington changed it to .30 Remington. I imagine putting a .30-30 WCF in a Rem 14 or 81 jams it up really good!

Both your pumps are neat guns. The 14 is a remarkable machined product; it would cost a small fortune to make today.
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Old October 8, 2011, 10:24 AM   #4
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I know this is an older post, but I believe the "A" in 14-A means that it was chambered in the short pistol calibers , such as .38-40 or .44-40.

I was curious it you are hunting with the Model 14 this year. I also have a Model 14 in .30 Remington. Dies are available from RCBS and right now Midway USA has .30 Remington brass. They also have .25 Remington brass which has generally been even harder to find. Good luck finding loaded ammunition. Boxes turn up from time to time on various boards, but Remington hasn't run any out of their factory for years. If you do handload, it's generally accepted to use .30-30 load data. Of course, be sure the gun is safe to shoot and work your way up from the starting loads.
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Old October 8, 2011, 01:52 PM   #5
Mike Irwin
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Coop,

The only problem with that theory is that the gun in question is clearly marked both 14-A and .30 Remington, which is not a pistol cartridge.

It also has the spiral tube magazine, which I believe none of the pistol-caliber guns had, only those chambered for the rifle cartridges.
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Old October 8, 2011, 04:55 PM   #6
Scorch
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Remington Model 14-1/2 was chambered for 38-40 and 44-40. The 14 was chambered in .25, .30, .32, and .35 Remington. The A means it is a standard grade rifle, as opposed to B, C, D, F (progressively higher grades).
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Old October 8, 2011, 06:45 PM   #7
James K
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Unfortunately, getting ammunition in any of those Remington calibers except .35 Remington may be difficult. .25 and .32 Remington are collectors cartridges, and .30 Remington is no longer made but some is still around. A previous poster gave sources for .30 Remngton brass and loading dies. Use bullets made for the .30-30 Winchester.

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Old October 8, 2011, 07:07 PM   #8
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Nevermind. It was the model 25 that was chambered in 25-20. Scorch is correct.

If I were to want a user model 14, I would surely want a 35 remington for the reasons James K stated.
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Old October 8, 2011, 08:30 PM   #9
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I see a decent amount of .25,.30, and .32 at firearm auctions. In fact, last week I went to one, and got a tray lot of jumbled ammo,(they're fun to look through, and you never know what might be in it),and found
8-.32's, 4-.30's, 5-.35's, along with 150 loose .22 mags, 50-.22 specials, along with other random calibers. All of this for 5 bucks. I have the ammo for the .32 and .30, but am lacking the guns. I have been trying to get a Remington 14 in those calibers for acouple years now, but they always go over what I am willing to spend.

A full box of .30 and .32 in good condition will cost anywhere between 40$ and 55$, it just depends on who is there. Pretty soon I will have a full box, by just getting tray lots!

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Old October 8, 2011, 09:09 PM   #10
OscarTurner
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Nice to see recent interest in this thread.

I still haven't fired the 14a yet, but its nobody's fault but mine. The gunsmith gave it a clean bill of health and I picked up a box of 20 new .30 Remington 150gr at the Dixie Classic for under $30. Of course, I'll be saving the brass! I have a few more days to get it sighted in for deer season, but I still plan on giving it some time in the filed this year.
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Old October 9, 2011, 08:57 AM   #11
Mike Irwin
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Fortunately, modern .30-30 cases can be converted to .30 Remington fairly easily if you have a metal working lathe. It doesn't even have to be an elaborate one.

All you have to do is turn the rim to the proper diameter.

You MAY have to recut the extractor groove, but apparently that's not always necessary.
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Old October 23, 2011, 11:02 PM   #12
coop923
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Quote:
Quote:
Quote:
The only problem with that theory is that the gun in question is clearly marked both 14-A and .30 Remington, which is not a pistol cartridge.
My mistake. I was thinking of the 14 1/2 as someone else stated.

While there's a few around here with Remington 14 experience, what's the purpose for the brass cartridge base-looking badge on the left side of the receiver for? I've noticed that some have the silver "primer" in the center, while others are open in the middle?
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Old October 23, 2011, 11:14 PM   #13
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I have no idea as to the answers to your questions, but those are some sweet looking lead slingers!
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Old October 24, 2011, 06:06 AM   #14
Mike Irwin
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"what's the purpose for the brass cartridge base-looking badge on the left side of the receiver for? I've noticed that some have the silver "primer" in the center, while others are open in the middle?"

It looks pretty, and it lets the shooter know what cartridge it uses.
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Old October 24, 2011, 08:20 AM   #15
model18
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model 14 in .35 Rem.



this is my buddy shooting my model 14 in .35 Rem. It's from 1929 and was handed down to me from my grandfather. This gun took alot of deer in PA and NY, back in the day and never with more than one shot with 150, 180 & 200 gr. rounds. (Anybody shoot the Hornady Lever ammo(red tip) in their's yet??) mine has the brass cartridge with the hollow center on the receiver. Nowadays we mostly plink with it, on the farm
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