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Old August 24, 2011, 01:22 AM   #1
Caboclo
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Reloading For Pump Rifles

I've been loading for my pistol for a while now, and just starting to get into rifles. While doing my homework, I read in a Lyman manual that ammo for pump guns and autos should be crimped, but not bolt guns. Why is this? I understand how an auto could cycle the round hard enough to bounce the bullet around in the case, but why does a pump action cycle harder than a bolt? The question is pertinent to me, because I just bought a Remington 760.

Also, I read elsewhere on this forum that neck-only sizing may not work for a pump gun. Why is that?
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Old August 24, 2011, 05:40 AM   #2
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Some of the older pump guns had tubular magazines and a fairly severe angle in the transition from the magazine to the chamber.

I've got a Rem 760 and have never seen a reason to crimp the ammo for that rifle.
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Old August 24, 2011, 06:29 AM   #3
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I agree with Paw Paw, I never crimped any ammo for my 760 and never had a problem. You don’t have the mechanical advantage you do with a bolt or lever gun that’s why full length sizing may be necessary. I always full length sized the rounds for mine.

As a side note, it is one of the most accurate rifles I’ve owned, terrible trigger, but a real shooter.
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Old August 24, 2011, 07:54 AM   #4
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Wouldn't it also depend on how much neck tension you are getting? If you have suffecient neck tension then crimping is much less of an issue.
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Old August 24, 2011, 09:33 AM   #5
oneoldsap
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760s Rule

I've been loading for 760s and 7600s for a long time ! No crimp is required . Neck sizing isn't an option because they may not chamber easily , pumps and Levers also , have no camming action to close the bolt on a tight round ! FL sizing is the way to go . Sometimes you'll find one that you need smallbase dies for . I'd hazard a quess that those are the last ones chambered at the end of the reamers life . The 760s do have a rotary bolt so there's no need to load down for them ! They are plenty strong , and when the crown is good and the barrell is tight , they will shoot as well as any unmodified bolt gun ! Keeping the Chamber clean and polished is a must for silky smooth operation ! You're gonna like your pump once you get accustomed to it , it's the quickest aimed follow up shot you can have !
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Old August 24, 2011, 10:38 AM   #6
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I once had a bullet seperate from the case in a magazine and I believe it was due to recoil. While shooting the rifle (a model 700 in 30/06) the last cartridge in the magazine kept getting pushed to the bottom. After about 15 rounds I noticed that the cartridge was growing in length and when I tried to take it out they came apart, spilling powder everywhere and jamming up the magazine. The rifle had a floor plate so the fix/cleanup was easy. If the rifle had a tubular magazine the process would have been much more involved.
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Old August 24, 2011, 11:34 PM   #7
Hog Buster
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AllenJ

Just the opposite with a tubular magazine, the bullet would be forced deeper into the case. This would create much more dire consequences than one that was too long.

Not a problem with a 760, it's magazine fed.
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Old August 26, 2011, 01:00 AM   #8
Caboclo
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Thanks guys. Great info.
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Old August 26, 2011, 11:51 PM   #9
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+1 on all of the above. I have been shooting a model 760 for nearly 30 yrs now and it is still one of the most accurate guns I have shot. In the field, it will keep up with the best of them. I would imagine it would hold its own on the bench against most unmodified bolt guns as well. Never have crimped anything for it. It seems to like the 165-180gr jacketed bullets. Haven't tried cast in it yet, but plan to do so soon. Have tried both full length sizing and small base sizing with no noticeable difference. It is a shooter and a pleasure to shoot.
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