The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > The Smithy

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old August 10, 2011, 08:34 PM   #1
M4BGRINGO
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 22, 2011
Posts: 241
Rem 1100 has problems

Has some trouble with it failing to eject the previous shell today when shooting doubles, never had an issue before.

Breeech bolt assembly seemed to be flopping-around a lot, really didn't realize what was wrong, finally, it completely jammed.

Had a heck of a time getting it apart, took some "pursasion"......

Have some missing parts but I'm not sure exactly what to order. Looked in the Rem manual and there seems to be some errors in their parts diagram.

Tempted to order what I "think" I need from Brownells hoping that they are the correct parts.

Anyone here ever take one apart? I do have a second Rem 1100 in 20 gauge that I took apart to see exactly what I am missing. I know why the breech bolt was flopping around, not sure if the retaining clip and parts involved will stay in place though, something seems strange..........
M4BGRINGO is offline  
Old August 10, 2011, 09:12 PM   #2
603Country
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 6, 2011
Location: Thornton, Texas
Posts: 2,260
I had an 1100 wear out on me years ago and spit parts. It had been shot a zillion times on host hunts, so I couldn't fault it for dying. The first indication that all wasn't right was that it wasn't ejecting the empty hull, so the empty and the fresh shell were both in the jammed open action. That might be your problem, and if so it's likely the pivot pin (what I call it) where the fresh shells feed out and get picked up by the action. The pivot pin is in place to only allow one fresh shell to pass. If memory is correct, dismantle the gun and flip it upside down and look on the inside right of the gun (barrel pointing away from you) and have a look at the small post with a pivot on it and a circlip holding that pivot onto the post. The post is soft metal, which is the problem and why it won't last forever, and it cannot be permanently fixed (per the gunsmith). Again, I'm going on memory here, so some of the finer details might be a bit wrong. Anyway, sell it and get a recoil operated shotgun by Browning or Benelli. You'll never have to clean a gunked up gas system and action again. You'll be overcome with a wild desire to buy me beer as a means of thanks. And if what I outlined isn't the problem that you have, my advice on selling it and getting the Benelli is still good.
603Country is offline  
Old August 10, 2011, 10:12 PM   #3
M4BGRINGO
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 22, 2011
Posts: 241
Ha, that's funny!

I know what pieces are missing in action. There is a plunger, a pin, a spring, and a retaining clip that hold the back of the bolt breech in place. All four pieces took a vacation............... This is letting the back of the breech bolt move up and down all over the place.

Not saying that is the only problem, I will check what you mentioned.

I finished the day shooting with my wife and I sharing her 870. Now I remember why I both love and hate pumps. They don't fail to eject and feed, as long as you remember to pump them! I was so used to my semi-auto I was forgetting to pump the gun before calling for another bird. I also miss the whimpy hit to my shoulder with my 1100, her 870 certainly has more kick. Call me Mr. Whimpy!

Remmingtons parts list seems to have some errors, I will try to call them and see what they have to say.

I will also see what my FFL has around, he does have a bunch of shotguns waiting for new owners.
M4BGRINGO is offline  
Old August 22, 2011, 03:44 PM   #4
Nevmavrick
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 2, 2010
Location: Sparks, Nevada, near Reno
Posts: 156
I am a fan of the M1100, and glance over at my trap gun, from time to time as I write this. When I decided to shoot trap a little more than just leagues, and a little afternoon delight, I bought a field M1100 with a trap barrel. 30yrs later, I still have her, and the only thing I've done is to replace the stock with a plastic one, and it now has a "push trigger." I don't shoot much trap anymore, so I'm glad I didn't throw the old trigger group away, tho' I get a complaint once in a while, about no safety. (It was the first thing changed when I stepped to the line the first time)
After more than 100K, she still purrs like a kitten, even for doubles, tho', like gets mentioned, you've got to keep the gas-system clean. The recoil-reduction is awsum. Shooting a lot of ammo in a day, it makes a LOT of difference.
603Country said to look into an old Browning or Benelli. They're both excellent guns, but I'd say, "Look into a gas Benelli, better yet, a new Winchester SX3."
I never thought I'd say to put serious thought into a Winchester, but I've sure changed my mind!
Good luck, whichever way you go.
Gene
Nevmavrick is offline  
Old August 22, 2011, 06:08 PM   #5
603Country
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 6, 2011
Location: Thornton, Texas
Posts: 2,260
Nevmavrick, I really did like shooting that 1100 I had. It was a great shooter and didn't kick much. I put thousands of rounds through it, but nothing like the 100,000 you put through yours. When mine started failing, I just put it down to wear and tear, since I had nothing else to explain the problems I was having. It always got a thorough cleaning after use. It was a Mourning Dove, Whitewing, Quail gun for me, and I used field loads that the company supplied, but nothing extreme in the way of loads. Anyway, it finally just got pounded into pieces (the pieces that fell out repeatedly), so I had it fixed one more time and sold it. But...the reason I respond to your note is to ask why you prefer gas operated shotguns. I guess they do kick a bit less, but a good recoil shotgun is so reliable and simple and quick to clean that I just can't ever see my going back to a gas operated shotgun. And one more thing way back in the day contributed to my eventual decision to get an old A5 type shotgun. I went duck hunting way down in South Louisiana. It was so far south that my guide didn't speak English at all, just Cajun French. He and every one of his guide buddies had A5 type guns. The guns were a wreck to look at, but just kept on shooting, and I didn't see anything get cleaned after a day of shooting. I still had the 1100 back then, and it needed a lot of cleaning. My 'new' gun is a Remington Model 11, built before 1948, with Briley chokes I had added. It doesn't point like the 1100 did, but after you get used to the humpback design it shoots great and will hit way out there. It does however, kick like a mule.
603Country is offline  
Old August 22, 2011, 07:53 PM   #6
Nevmavrick
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 2, 2010
Location: Sparks, Nevada, near Reno
Posts: 156
The first shotgun I used any amount was an M11, borrowed, then later, another borrowed, A5. I thought strongly of both. I had to borrow the Browning because I was a poor, broke boy.
Later, I was able to find a very inexpensive (one could say "cheap" and not be far off) imported O/U 12 ga. I've carried THAT for about 35 years, now, and the only thing I've done is to paint it with spray cans, and cut the chokes to IC for better patterning with #4 Buck, for called in coyotes. It patterns well for a round or two of trap or skeet with #8s, FTTT.
Then came the M1100...a sleek, quick-working, recoil-reducing autoloader. At the time, it was probably the best, easiest-shooting auto I could get.
Because I had a modified, field grade gun, I had to set it up to shoot right, and some thought it may not look too good. I found that if you hold your nose too high in the air, it will adversely affect your shooting. My guns tend to the industrial-grade. Anyway, that was a long time ago, and times change.
As much as I enjoy my M1100, and it's looks have improved over the years, if someone were to offer me a fair price, I'd let it go with no further thought. It's had some internals replaced, but it will prolly start losing more as time goes by.
As I said, it's now later, and technology treks on. If I were to do the same path, but now, I'd use the latest gun available...The Benelli, or the Winchester SX3.
A gas-operated auto is sleeker, lighter, reduces recoil as well or better, and when necessary, will jump between Little Mags, and lightweight trap loads faster.
When I was shooting, a 1oz light was just coming in, now I see people using 7/8oz in singles, and the first shot in doubles. It would take a sensitive auto to use THAT load. The field equivilant would be quail, where you would be shooting in a T-shirt, and want to carry a light gun.
An A5 feels large, and shoots "clunky" to me, tho' an 11-48, Benelli or Franci would fill the ticket.
The new gassers don't need to be cleaned as often, either. new technology!
Maybe we'll have a sundowner, after some upland shooting, when we bump into each other outy ther.
Have fun,
Gene
Nevmavrick is offline  
Old August 24, 2011, 04:41 PM   #7
603Country
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 6, 2011
Location: Thornton, Texas
Posts: 2,260
You make a lot of sense, and I'll have to admit that the A5/Model 11 are rather clunky. No way we can call them sleek. I haven't shot any of the newer gas operated shotguns or recoil operated shotguns from the last decade, so my hands-on experience is dated. I have several shotguns in the gun safe, but they are pumps of various ages and one 20 gauge 1100 and that old Model 11 of mine. It's highly unlikely that I'll have need of anything newer than what's in the safe now, since I don't bird hunt like I once did. I did once have plans to talk a son-in-law out of his Benelli Super Black Eagle, but my daughter replaced him with a new son-in-law that doesn't hunt. Darn. Anyway, I did enjoy our back and forth discussion. Hunting season will be upon us soon, so have a great one.
603Country is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.07529 seconds with 9 queries