The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Hide > The Hunt

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools
Old August 3, 2011, 01:12 AM   #51
Alaska444
Junior member
 
Join Date: April 3, 2010
Posts: 1,231
This sounds like the home invasion by mountain lion you are talking about.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/0..._n_488254.html

One more reason to always carry wherever you are. Even at home.
Alaska444 is offline  
Old August 3, 2011, 01:15 AM   #52
Double Naught Spy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 8, 2001
Location: Forestburg, Montague County, Texas
Posts: 10,389
Quote:
They are all technically correct statements with some minor qualifications.
Well then they are not "technically correct." Where they erred was in the technical details. Mountain lions aren't the fastest predator, most agile, or only predator in North America to use ambush tactics. That is just sensationalized hype, but it it what was claimed and it was wrong.

Quote:
Cougars are ambush predators which is why many experienced woodsmen fear them more than bears even though bears are larger and stronger. Bears can ambush prey, but it is a trademark MO of cougars.
Ambushing is the trademark of cougars? You mean stalk and ambush, don't you? Is it not the "trademark" of several other species of North American felids as well, such as the jaguar, ocelot, bobcat, and jaguarundi? It really isn't a "trademark" tactic at all given that it is shared with the other felids, LOL. It is a preferred method they use, but it is not a trait of only the mountain lion in North America.
__________________
"If you look through your scope and see your shoe, aim higher."
-- said to me by my 11 year old daughter before going out for hogs 8/13/2011
Double Naught Spy is offline  
Old August 3, 2011, 10:14 AM   #53
Art Eatman
Staff Lead
 
Join Date: November 13, 1998
Location: Terlingua, TX, USA
Posts: 22,458
I figure that a cougar is the fastest and most agile and will definitely ambush--as in lie in wait, which is separate from stalking--which could be dangerous to people. And it's the possible danger to people which is the main thrust of this thread, not abilities and tactics per se. What a peregrine or housecat can do is irrelevant to the issue of danger to us as possible supper.
__________________
You're from BATFE? Come right in! I use all your fine products!
Art Eatman is offline  
Old August 3, 2011, 11:49 AM   #54
Alaska444
Junior member
 
Join Date: April 3, 2010
Posts: 1,231
Quote:
Double Naught Spy
Senior Member

Join Date: January 8, 2001
Location: Forestburg, Montague County, Texas
Posts: 7,864
Quote:
They are all technically correct statements with some minor qualifications.
Well then they are not "technically correct." Where they erred was in the technical details. Mountain lions aren't the fastest predator, most agile, or only predator in North America to use ambush tactics. That is just sensationalized hype, but it it what was claimed and it was wrong.

Quote:
Cougars are ambush predators which is why many experienced woodsmen fear them more than bears even though bears are larger and stronger. Bears can ambush prey, but it is a trademark MO of cougars.
Ambushing is the trademark of cougars? You mean stalk and ambush, don't you? Is it not the "trademark" of several other species of North American felids as well, such as the jaguar, ocelot, bobcat, and jaguarundi? It really isn't a "trademark" tactic at all given that it is shared with the other felids, LOL. It is a preferred method they use, but it is not a trait of only the mountain lion in North America.
__________________
Texas BorderWatch www.blueservo.net
Oh my, grasping at straws are we? Geez, we have been talking about northern animals. Bobcat??? how many people have been attacked by a bobcat? Mind you, I wouldn't want to fend off one of those little devils, but good grief, give it a rest.

For folks in the US and Canada, mountain lions are the fastest LAND predator, and for it's size, the most agile, and it does commonly ambush its prey and it has the ability to stalk silently and leap about 20 feet, hide in trees above and blend into the background. All of those attributes make it a creepy predator worthy of fear in the woods as all too many have found out too late.
Alaska444 is offline  
Old August 3, 2011, 11:52 AM   #55
Alaska444
Junior member
 
Join Date: April 3, 2010
Posts: 1,231
Quote:
Today, 08:14 AM #53
Art Eatman
Staff

Join Date: November 13, 1998
Location: Terlingua, TX, USA
Posts: 18,497
I figure that a cougar is the fastest and most agile and will definitely ambush--as in lie in wait, which is separate from stalking--which could be dangerous to people. And it's the possible danger to people which is the main thrust of this thread, not abilities and tactics per se. What a peregrine or housecat can do is irrelevant to the issue of danger to us as possible supper.
__________________
Want to be cruel? Make someone think.
+1, right on. Agree with all you have stated, but you did forget the baddest predator of all, the walking stick, the praying mantis, they are Baaad.
Alaska444 is offline  
Old August 3, 2011, 12:14 PM   #56
Wuchak
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 1, 2007
Location: Shawnee, KS
Posts: 1,093
Cougar attacks since 2001 in the US with detailed descriptions of each event.
http://http://www.cougarinfo.org/attacks3.htm

Cougar attacks in the US 1991 to 2000
http://www.cougarinfo.org/attacks2.htm

This is one cougar attack story that has stuck with me. It attacked a child on horseback that was part of a group. So much for size or numbers being a deterrent. Lots of the stories are people in a group being attacked. The cougar has no fear of hunting a group. They just look for the weakest member and an opportunity to strike.

August 19, 1996
A British Columbia mother was killed defending her 6-year-old Steven. A little after 6:00 p.m. *35 or 36-year-old Cindy Parolin and three of her four children, were still riding on horseback on the seldom traveled Tulameen River Road nearest to the tiny town of Tulameen about 30 miles northwest of Princeton, British Columbia. They were on a more than 20 mile journey to meet Cindy's husband Les at a camping site. Their horses became increasingly nervous. The cause became clear when a mountain lion was spotted. It suddenly jumped from the undergrowth at little Steven. The boy was thrown from his horse where the lion attacked him. The mother screamed at it and leapt from her horse, clubbing the lion away from her son with a branch she was able to break off. Then she continued to fight the animal and instructed her two other children to get the injured youngster to the safety of their car and then to get help. Finally, her older son found an armed camper, Jim Manion, who was led to the scene. He found Cindy still fighting the cougar more than an hour later. Much of her upper torso had been consumed. It was amazing she was still alive. She asked if her children were OK, and when Jim said yes, she said in a half-whisper, "I am dying now," and she collapsed.
Jim fired a shot to scare the lion away from Cindy's limp body. It worked, but as lion slinked toward him, his gun jammed. At the last moment, Jim got his gun cleared and fired at the charging lion without being able to aim. He hit the lion and it fled into the brush. Wildlife officials later found it where it died about 150 feet from the trail.

Cindy died from her injuries. Her son Steven made a full recovery. This male mountain lion weighed only 65 pounds though there was plenty of prey in the area.
Wuchak is offline  
Old August 8, 2011, 04:13 PM   #57
Jack O'Conner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 11, 2005
Location: Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,475


I'd keep a dog and a 30-30 carbine close by.

Photo was sent to me by a friend. Photographer is unknown to me.

Jack
__________________
Fire up the grill! Deer hunting IS NOT catch and release.
Jack O'Conner is offline  
Old August 19, 2011, 01:57 PM   #58
tahunua001
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 21, 2011
Location: Idaho
Posts: 5,997
Quote:
Quote:
+1, thank you for telling it like it is
Too bad so much of it was wrong.

Quote:
cougars are the fastest predators in north america and know it
They may be the fastest predatory mammals over a short distance, but they are not the fastest mammal predators over distance and certainly not the fastest predators in North America. The Peregrine falcon takes that spot, I believe.

Quote:
cougars are the most agile predators in north america and they know it
This would all depend on what is meant by agile. They are agile, but so too are lots of predators.


Quote:
cougars are the only predators in north america that will ambush their prey.
Cougars are not even the only mammalian predator in North America that ambushes its prey. Ambush tactics are common to most major predators at least from insects through mammals. http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-an-ambush-predator.htm

Quote:
cougars scare the living crap out of me
That's probably true.

Quote:
little trick I heard about but have never used. if you are out hiking and you find bear crap, bag it and spread it around the edge of your campsite.
cougar avoids bear smell and bears smell people and stay away.
Is that like horse hair rope encircling your camp will keep snakes out? Also, Stephen Hererra has documented and discussed the fact that the smell of people certainly cannot be counted on at all to keep bears away. You do know that bear attacks are more common than mountain lion attacks on humans, right?
ok since everything I say cant go scrutinized by double naught

who in history has ever been attacked by a peregrine falcon? this little fact is completely irrelevant to the conversation at hand. let me rephrase. they are the fastest predator mammal in the US.

they are the most agile predator. again, you are pulling up technicalities. who has ever been attacked and eaten by a predatory insect? again I'll rephrase, they are the most agile predatory mammal in the US.

they are the only predatory mammals that ambush their prey as a primary method. any predator will take adavantage of a quick meal if it's desperate enough.

I'm glad that I offer such entertainment to somebody
__________________
ignore my complete lack of capitalization. I still have no problem correcting your grammar.
I never said half the crap people said I did-Albert Einstein
You can't believe everything you read on the internet-Benjamin Franklin
Bean counters told me I couldn't fire a man for being in a wheelchair, did it anyway. Ramps are expensive.-Cave Johnson.
tahunua001 is offline  
Old August 19, 2011, 02:31 PM   #59
oneounceload
Junior member
 
Join Date: April 18, 2008
Location: N. Central Florida
Posts: 8,518
Quote:
I'd keep a dog and a 30-30 carbine close by.

Photo was sent to me by a friend. Photographer is unknown to me.
a 22 mag or 38 will do the job easily - no need to tote a 30-30
oneounceload is offline  
Old August 19, 2011, 02:47 PM   #60
Tomas
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 9, 1999
Location: Blue State
Posts: 384
Worrying about cougars is like worry about being shot when you go into combat - you just can't properly do your job (or enjoy yourself in the woods) if you are worried about it. They are stealth machines. They can jump over a school bus - the long way...not making this up, it's a fact. Chances are if you are attacked you will not know it's coming until it happens. So just go out there and not think about.

What follows is a true story, and probably my best hunting story ever, though it's not really about hunting, per se.

My second year elk hunting, we had one cow hanging. That night, the horses spooked, trampled their electric fence and my tent with me in it. After we tracked them down and fixed the pen, all was well. The next morning we discovered the better part of a hind quarter was eaten. Furthermore, all the remaining dog food in the bowls had been eaten, and of the three german shepherds sleeping in the tents (I didn't have one), not one peeped while the cougar was finishing their dinners. We took the biggest, baddest one, a 100 lb black one named Knight- who thinks he's all that - over to the meat pole and he tracked the cougar into a creek bed about 20 feet away. His legs started shaking, he ****** himself, and refused to go any further.

So, smart hunters that we were, I decided to use my USMC training, and put my combat experience to use, and we'd booby trap the meat. We killed another cow that day, hung it up next to the first one, and strung two sets of wire around the carcasses, high and low, with cans filled with rocks and a bunch of other stuff that would make a bunch of noise when mr. cougar came back to feed - which we were sure would happen. That night, the horses spooked again, trampled the fence again, and my tent. . .fix the fence and my tent after chasing down the horses, check the meat this time - it's all fine - go back to bed. Next morning I get up and the fresh cow has part of a hind quarter gone. Nobody woke up (dang dogs). Cougar didn't make a sound.

That day, we killed a third cow, hung it up, and "enhanced" the noise makers around the meat. Finally, a quiet night. I get up in the morning to check on the meat. It's the only time I've ever gotten up at elk camp and not at least strapped on my Glock 20. I walk over to the meat pole and one of the freshly hung hindquarters is GONE! (shameful to even call myself a Marine) I look to my right and see the cougar trying to drag it across the creek!!! I start yelling and throwing things, cougar hisses at me and runs off as the posse arms up to hunt the thief down. Dogs were no help, hiding in the tents, and we never found the big cat.

This is all a true story, those cats are sneaky buggers, and I've been hunting 10 more seasons and never seen one since. I love 'em!!
Tomas is offline  
Old August 19, 2011, 02:50 PM   #61
Double Naught Spy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 8, 2001
Location: Forestburg, Montague County, Texas
Posts: 10,389
Well if you are going to make statements that you present as fact, then it is realy best that your statements are actually fact. It is difficult to be credible when your information is obviously manipulated to make a point. You overstated things and made them not true.

Quote:
who in history has ever been attacked by a peregrine falcon?
Since you asked...
http://www.wbu.com/chipperwoods/photos/perefalcon.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nN0OqPjADVk
http://www.asic.ca/client/asic/photo.nsf/a8f6cdcaf82e1b118525742400181b0a/1244e656fed9e52a8525756100496b6c/$FILE/Town%20Hall%20MeetingQA.pdf
http://thebsreport.wordpress.com/201...ts-in-buffalo/
http://www.journalgazette.net/apps/p...1009999&Ref=PH
__________________
"If you look through your scope and see your shoe, aim higher."
-- said to me by my 11 year old daughter before going out for hogs 8/13/2011
Double Naught Spy is offline  
Old August 19, 2011, 11:16 PM   #62
Art Eatman
Staff Lead
 
Join Date: November 13, 1998
Location: Terlingua, TX, USA
Posts: 22,458
Hey, ya gotta watch them peagrinds. I watched one ruin a rock squirrel's day in my front yard, one morning. He spent about fifteen minutes doing brunch.

Enough. This thread is starting to go around in circles.

I just hate dizzy...
__________________
You're from BATFE? Come right in! I use all your fine products!
Art Eatman is offline  
Closed Thread

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.09444 seconds with 9 queries