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Old July 31, 2011, 07:16 PM   #1
PCB2054
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.300 WSM and .257 Roberts Reloading Questions

I just bought a Remington model 700 CDL SF in .300 WSM and really love it. I bought 2 boxes of 150 grain Remington Coreloks when I originally picked up the gun. I have shot those and decided to start reloading myself. I figured I would just resize and use this remington brass until I find a load I like and then go buy new brass and use that. I have reloaded in the past with no problems ever, but when I reloaded ten of these .300 WSM shells only five of them chambered correctly. The other five were extremely tight. The five that chambered correctly shot extremely well. Any thoughts or similar problems? P.S.- I am pretty sure that everything is adjusted correctly and can't figure out what the issue could be. Appreciate suggestions.

My brother just got his .257 Roberts redone by a gunsmith who notoriously does GREAT work and he is reloading shells for it. My brother decided to shoot a Sierra 100 grain boat tail bullet and uses a max load to start. (not correct I KNOW). This did not shoot very accurately so we dropped the amount of powder considerably and it still didn't shoot very well. Definitely more accurately with the lower powder but not great. Do you think that a smaller bullet is the next thing to try. I think a smaller bullet and a low amount of powder for that bullet will hopefully increase accuracy. Let me know!

P.S.-any opinions on the Remington 700 CDL SF in .300 WSM. I love it!! If only i could get these shell to chamber with some regularity. Thanks!
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Old July 31, 2011, 08:54 PM   #2
T. O'Heir
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Sounds like your .300 cases aren't being sized properly. The dies should be set up so the shell holder just kisses the bottom of the die with the ram all the way up. You can reload your Remington brass far more than just working up the load too.
Your brother needs to work up the load from the starting load given in your manual. Not just pick one and hope. Going to a lighter bullet won't make any difference if he's not going to work up the load. The rifling twist in the barrel will matter as well.
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Old July 31, 2011, 10:13 PM   #3
AllenJ
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The above suggestion is the place to start but I'm wondering why 5 were OK? When lubing did you use enough on the inside of the case mouth? On the up-stroke, when the ball is sizing the inside of the case mouth, I have read that if you go to fast or don't use enough lube it can cause the shoulder angle to change slightly and that could also be part of the problem.

As for the 257, what is the twist rate of the barrel? That should give you an indication of what weight bullet to shoot.

My opinion on your new rifle is that it sounds like you made a good purchase. I love the short mags, and I have always liked the looks of the CDL SF. Enjoy your rifle.
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Old August 1, 2011, 12:27 AM   #4
hoghunting
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Welcome to the forum.

I load for my 300 WSM and the WSM cases need to be sized a little differently. You will need to adjust your sizing die so there isn't a gap between the shell holder and the sizing die when the ram is fully extended with a case in the shell holder. Sometimes the cases still won't be sized enough to chamber, and you can either remove a few thousandths from the bottom of the sizing die or from the top of the shell holder. I ground 0.007" off the top of my shell holder as it is easier and cheaper to replace than a sizing die.
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Old August 1, 2011, 03:48 AM   #5
old roper
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I got the 300WSM when they first came out back then it was a problem sizing case. I use bushing neck dies but at some point I have to reszie and I normally use a FL body die. You can file the shellhoder down like hoghunting mention or buy like I did a Small base sizer from RCBS and midway has them in stock.

Well good luck
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Old August 1, 2011, 01:53 PM   #6
Doodlebugger45
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I haven't had to modify my dies or shell holders for my WSM cartridges, but I did have to turn the dies in about a half turn to ensure full sizing due to the press flexing a bit.

It does sound like your press is barely sizing them enough for some cases and not quite enough for others. Try turning the dies in a bit beyond the contact with the shell holder to be sure the press isn't flexing a bit. Measure the deck height of the shell holder as well. It's unusual, but I did have one RCBS 7 mm shell holder that was 0.132" tall rather than the customary 0.125". Before I resort to grinding anything off the shell holder or die, I try using "the companion tool to the press, the feeler gauge " and put it underneath the head of the case in between that and the shell holder to raise it up just a bit. You can usually stick a 0.005" feeler gauge in there. Then size the case and see if that works. Only then do I resort to grinding something off the shell holder or die.
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Old August 1, 2011, 04:59 PM   #7
steve4102
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Very common in the 300 WSM. Screw the FL sizing die into the press a little at a time until the offending brass chambers with ease. Heavy cam-over may be needed.
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Old August 1, 2011, 06:54 PM   #8
PCB2054
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Thanks Fellas

Sounds like tomorrow I will screw the die in a little tighter and make sure the cases are lubed well. If this does not work then I will try and grind a few thousands off the top of the shell holder. I appreciate the suggestions fellas!
As for my brothers rifle it is a 1-10 twist. In my opinion he should go with a smaller bullet and start with a small load and work his way up. whats your opinion? Thanks again fellas this forum has been helpful!
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Old August 2, 2011, 12:11 AM   #9
hoghunting
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Most .30 cal barrels are 1 in 10" twist. I use 165 gr bullets in mine, and load to almost max. The WSMs seem to be more consistent closer to max than a starting load.
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Old August 2, 2011, 10:23 AM   #10
Doodlebugger45
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In regards to your brother's .257 Roberts loading, you didn't tell us the powder you used, but even so, you guys have barely even scratched the surface of load development.

Basically, you said you loaded up a batch at max powder and it didn't work. So you loaded up a batch with "considerably less" and it was better but not good. So now you're in search of a different bullet?

It is true that some bullets work way better than others in a given rifle. Some bullets just don't work at all in one rifle. You never know for sure, but in my case, generally the heavier bullets tend to work a little better than lighter ones. In this case, the 100 gr bullet was about mid weight for the cartridge, not a bad place to start. And in general, I have had excellent results with Sierra bullets. All in all, I agree with your choice of a bullet to start with.

Yoou have already proven that the rifle is capable of max loads with that powder/bullet. What you need to do now is take a systematic approach in regard to powder weight. Let's say you were loading with H-4831 powder (that would be my choice to start with). Max is about 49.0 gr, so 1% of that is 0.5 gr. So make up 3-5 rounds of that cartridge using 46.0 gr of powder, another 3-5 using 46.5 gr, another set at 47.0 gr, etc until you have 6 sets that are identical except they weigh from 46.0 to 48.5 gr. Whether you make 3 or 4 or 5 of each is up to you. Now set up 6 targets. Fire one round from the 46.0 gr load at the first target, then fire one round from the 46.5 gr load at the next target, and so on until you have shot one round at each target. Then go back and fire the 46.0 gr load at the first target again. And so on.

You should see a trend develop there. 2 or 3 of the loads will be a bit closer in group size than the others. 1 or 2 of them should have the best group size of all if you're shooting consistently.

Only after that can you decide whether you want to switch powders or bullets.
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