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Old June 18, 2011, 11:57 AM   #26
Shootin Chef
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Ok so is there something I should know about acquiring .40 S&W bullets? I've checked both major gun stores here and they have every caliber but .40 S&W. Am I missing something?

Also the cleaning process begins today, providing I can find naval jelly and steel wool, paint shouldn't be difficult unless it's gonna be another humid one.
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Old June 18, 2011, 12:12 PM   #27
Geezerbiker
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I bought one used one sans the priming system for 20 bucks back in 1986 at the gun shop in Astoria, OR. I've loaded a bunch of ammo with it over the years but I had to feed the primers one at a time.

Now that I see what mine is missing, I'm wondering if I can find those parts...

It's been a great press for me and I have no desire to replace it with anything newer...

Tony
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Old June 18, 2011, 01:24 PM   #28
Lost Sheep
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I LIKE to prime on the press

I don't want to start an argument, but merely present a differing opinion. My shooting buddy primes off-press and I don't have a problem with anyone who does. I prefer to prime on-press.
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What about the primer device? Is it to corroded? It doesn't seem to seat very well in the metal piece at the back of the press unless I move it in there.
As stated by others, press-based priming systems are not the best way to go. They exert too much pressure (can crush primers), and are not sensitive enough (cannot easily feel when the primer has bottomed out in the primer pocket). However, the primer system looks like it can be salvaged by carefully removing the rust. The priming post spring may or may not be salvageable however, but parts can be obtained from RCBS if you want to make the priming system work again.
I started with RCBS Jr, then traded for a Rockchucker. Used a couple of Lee Pro-1000s for decades and finally traded "up" to a Lee Classic Turret. I have owned and used Lee Auto-prime tools, an ancient Redding hand primer and RCBS bench-mounted primer and used my friends RCBS hand primer.

I prefer to prime on the press. I can feel the primer seat in the bottom of the primer pocket just fine, especially if I use my fingertips on the press handle. I also pay attention to the position of the handle, as this gives an indication or how deeply the primer is seated. Using the hand primer tires my hand out and gives no better "feel" for me than the press does.

Using the on-press RCBS priming system, I never dropped a single primer, nor got a single primer in sideways on my Rockchucker or my Jr. Not once in several years.

Some people do not like having their primers stacked atop one another in a tube. Something about, "if one primer detonates, there is a good chance many of the others will go off, too, which is too much excitement in a reloading session." Never happened to me, but I do not doubt that it is possible. My Lee Safety Prime stacks the primers side-by-side instead of atop one another.

Consider all the facts and factors and you will make your own choice. But don't throw the priming parts away. There are people who want them and will trade a holster or bullet puller for them.

Please note that ALL progressive presses, by the nature of continuous processing, prime on the press. Granted, some loaders pull the case, prime and re-insert, but the press designers designed them to prime on-press.

Quote:
It doesn't seem to seat very well in the metal piece at the back of the press unless I move it in there.
There should be a spring-loaded "stop" in the metal piece at the back of the press. This blocks the outfall of the primer tube (when it is inserted in the metal piece), so all the primers do not fall out at once. You push the priming arm, compressing the "stop" and allowing a single primer to drop into the priming arm's cup. This spring-loaded stop is probably what prevents the priming arm from seating easily, that you have observed. If there is rust in the recess where that spring is, it will not work very well.

Good luck

Lost Sheep
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Old June 18, 2011, 01:34 PM   #29
Lost Sheep
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DLB435 did the same thing with a press in worse shape

http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=439810
or, if the link does not work, past this into your browser
thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=439810

This is what it looked like when he got done. Note the condition of the priming arm, press handle and the linkage is unpainted and still ..."ugly?"..., but perfectly functional.


I waited for DLB435 to respond to this thread, but he must be in his reloading room.

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Old June 18, 2011, 02:51 PM   #30
Shootin Chef
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I actually read DLB's thread awhile back, I was hoping he would chime in to give me a good method to go about cleaning it up.

Anyone happen to know the shellholder size for .40S&W?

*edit* nevermind found it, #27
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Old June 19, 2011, 11:51 AM   #31
newrugersafan
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"Ok so is there something I should know about acquiring .40 S&W bullets? I've checked both major gun stores here and they have every caliber but .40 S&W. Am I missing something?"

I'm not trying to be a smart-a$$ but have you seen any 10 mm in your search ? It's the same bullet .400".

Mike
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Old June 19, 2011, 12:47 PM   #32
Shootin Chef
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Nope, not even boss. Plenty of .38, 9mm, .45 but not a single .40/10mm I don't really want to order online because I like supporting my local stores and shipping is a pain on heavy stuff like bullets but it's looking like I might have to.
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Old June 19, 2011, 01:41 PM   #33
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I read that automotive coolant (anti-freeze to us old folks) is a great rust remover, but I haven't had an occasion to give it a try. Has anyone used coolant as a rust remover?
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Old June 19, 2011, 05:49 PM   #34
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I have a couple of Jrs, one's even an aluminum model that I mounted on a small portable table. Mine had the priming arm but not the tube system. I don't miss it at all, prefer the Lee Auto Prime. Yours is a bit older than either of mine but it looks good to me. As long as it moves freely and acommodates dies and shell holders you're good. I like my tools with a bit of character but that shiny new paint job above does look purty.
Either way you have a fine press and when you put it to work you'll make your dad proud.
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