The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old March 27, 2011, 12:31 AM   #1
chris in va
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 26, 2004
Location: Louisville KY
Posts: 12,350
Crimped primer pockets?

Will these need to be reamed/swaged out so the primer can seat properly? If so, is there a more efficient way of doing it besides the little Lyman hand reamer or the $$$ swaging press?

chris in va is offline  
Old March 27, 2011, 12:40 AM   #2
Utahar15
Member
 
Join Date: March 1, 2011
Posts: 57
RCBS

This is another way to remove it.

Robb
Utahar15 is offline  
Old March 27, 2011, 12:47 AM   #3
FrankenMauser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: 1B ID
Posts: 6,385
I use a chamfer/deburring tool. Once the brass is deprimed, a couple turns of the wrist will have the crimp ring removed (and the slight bevel is nice for primer seating).
__________________
"Such is the strange way that man works -- first he virtually destroys a species and then does everything in his power to restore it."
FrankenMauser is offline  
Old March 27, 2011, 08:54 AM   #4
Locoweed
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 8, 2008
Location: Alabama
Posts: 634
"I use a chamfer/deburring tool. Once the brass is deprimed, a couple turns of the wrist will have the crimp ring removed (and the slight bevel is nice for primer seating)."

I use the chamfering tool too. Works great and a couple quick twists removes the crimp. I have a Dillon tool that I use on my .223.
Locoweed is offline  
Old March 27, 2011, 10:09 AM   #5
snuffy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 20, 2001
Location: Oshkosh wi.
Posts: 2,734
Quote:
Crimped primer pockets?
Will these need to be reamed/swaged out so the primer can seat properly?
Dunno about the far left one,(can't see it), but the other two don't look to be crimped. One sure way to tell is to deprime/size, then try to seat a new primer.

Dunno what the Lyman reamer looks like, but I use the one made by Hornady;

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct...tNumber=253550



I use it in a cordless drill, or have it mounted in my RCBS case prep center. It takes less than a second in each case to remove the crimp, and radius the edge of the primer pocket.
__________________
The more people I meet, the more I love my dog

They're going to get their butts kicked over there this election. How come people can't spell and use words correctly?
snuffy is offline  
Old March 27, 2011, 01:31 PM   #6
chris in va
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 26, 2004
Location: Louisville KY
Posts: 12,350
Snuffy, you're brilliant.

I already have one of these for large rifle pockets...



...and I just now discovered the bit at the end can be unscrewed. Hundreds of cases reaming by $*%& hand and I could have just chucked it in a drill.

My LGS has these in small rifle so I'll go get one later.

Thanks!

Last edited by chris in va; March 30, 2011 at 09:17 PM.
chris in va is offline  
Old March 27, 2011, 05:02 PM   #7
FrankenMauser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: 1B ID
Posts: 6,385
It's not polite (often illegal) to steal photos from merchants, even if they're stock photos. Just link to the image, if you don't have a photo of your own.

(Neither Midway, nor westernfirearms.com.au allow third-party links, or image usage without express written permission.)
__________________
"Such is the strange way that man works -- first he virtually destroys a species and then does everything in his power to restore it."
FrankenMauser is offline  
Old March 27, 2011, 05:28 PM   #8
snuffy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 20, 2001
Location: Oshkosh wi.
Posts: 2,734
Frank, I didn't know that it might be illegal to link to their pic of a tool. Western firearms don't like it, but I never heard of them till just now. I doubt midway feels the same way, but then everybody's heard of them.

Think about it, I may have just sold somebody on that crimp reamer. How in tarnation can that be a bad thing?

If it was not allowed, they'd have the pic blocked from being able to copy from their site. It can only benefit them, so I do it because I can.

I have noticed on other companies sites, right clicking on an image will not bring up a copy opportunity, I guess they really don't want anybody to buy their stuff. OR they just want people to use a link to visit their site. Problem with that is, some don't have the time to click on a link.

Oh, now I see you weren't pointing your finger at me, or was it both of us?

Quote:
Snuffy, you're brilliant.
Now don't say that too loud, or my hat won't fit!
__________________
The more people I meet, the more I love my dog

They're going to get their butts kicked over there this election. How come people can't spell and use words correctly?
snuffy is offline  
Old March 28, 2011, 08:51 AM   #9
Nevmavrick
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 2, 2010
Location: Sparks, Nevada, near Reno
Posts: 154
I've used reamers of one type or another 'til I was crosseyed. Bad feelin'.
I now use the RCBS, which has the swage for both the large and small primers.
I recommend the Redding, tho', it's a LOT easier to use.
This info is based on LOTS and LOTS of cases that need to be done. If you're going to do only a hunnert or so, the reamer works just fine.
Have fun,
Gene
Nevmavrick is offline  
Old March 28, 2011, 11:55 AM   #10
mikld
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 7, 2009
Location: Southern Oregon!
Posts: 942
"I use a chamfer/deburring tool. Once the brass is deprimed, a couple turns of the wrist will have the crimp ring removed (and the slight bevel is nice for primer seating)".
__________________
Me too. I have some tools from my machinist days left over so I just use a 60 degree countersink w/hex shaft in an electric screwdriver. 1 second in each pocket, crimp gone! (or one twist by hand).
__________________
My Anchor is holding fast!
mikld is offline  
Old March 30, 2011, 01:06 PM   #11
tom234
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 14, 2008
Location: Kansas
Posts: 752
You're on the right track with the Lyman primer pocket reamer. I just take the handle off the reamer and chuck up the reamer in a hand drill, better yet a drill press. Easier to let electricity do the turning. I've removed the crimp from several thousand .30-06 and .223 cases this way.........
tom234 is offline  
Old March 30, 2011, 04:08 PM   #12
edward5759
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 15, 2009
Location: Phoenix, AZ. 30 miles from water, two feet from Hell.
Posts: 354
I have several Dillon progressive loaders 650s
have over twelve different types of trimmers .
still the fastest way I found is a mini lathe.
Ed5759
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 100_0686.jpg (215.0 KB, 24 views)
File Type: jpg 100_0685.jpg (237.9 KB, 23 views)
edward5759 is offline  
Old March 30, 2011, 05:08 PM   #13
89blazin
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 13, 2009
Posts: 107
I use a Dillon swage. Cost $90, but makes quick work of it, and worth ever dime when reloading a couple thousand once fired Lake City 7.62 per year.
89blazin is offline  
Old March 30, 2011, 09:18 PM   #14
chris in va
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 26, 2004
Location: Louisville KY
Posts: 12,350
Changed the pic, didn't even see the mark at the bottom.
chris in va is offline  
Old March 30, 2011, 09:38 PM   #15
m&p45acp10+1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 3, 2009
Location: Central Texas
Posts: 3,307
I may eventualy get a primer pocket reamer. I have so much .223 brass that when I get a crimped primer pocket I put them in a bag off to the side. Still have a 5 gallon bucket full to size and trim. With 4 three pound coffee cans of fireformed brass for my rifle.

I find it strange that I have had more PMC and Federal cases than I can count where there were a hand full of crimped pockets, with no crimp on the rest from the same box of loaded ammo that the guys shot.
__________________
No matter how many times you do it and nothing happens it only takes something going wrong one time to kill you.
m&p45acp10+1 is offline  
Old March 30, 2011, 09:56 PM   #16
That'll Do
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 25, 2008
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 547
I ended up buy the RCBS Trim Mate Case Prep Center, and then bought the crimp remover tool, because I have 3000+ pieces of 223 brass to process, and there is NO WAY I'd be deburring and removing the primer crimp by hand.

The Trim Mate was about $120 with shipping, and the crimp remover was about $15. Money well spent, no doubt. Now I need (want) a power case trimmer, my arm gets sore trimmer all that brass!
That'll Do is offline  
Old March 30, 2011, 10:19 PM   #17
Osage
Member
 
Join Date: September 27, 2005
Location: Missouri
Posts: 69
I got a brand new lyman reamer in the mail today to tackle some 223 range brass of which a lot had military crimp. I wasn't real impressed. 1/4 of those I reamed I had a difficult time seating the primer. I ended up using my Lee chamfer tool along with the reamer and got them all seated. I could get it all the way in to the shoulder of the reamer and it wasn't cutting anymore but it left too much on the shoulder - so I think. I don't plan on reloading a lot of military crimped ammo so hopefully I can get through what I have. Beats nothing but not by much.
Osage is offline  
Old March 30, 2011, 11:02 PM   #18
hk33ka1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 20, 2010
Posts: 275
I chuck mine in a drill press, same with Primer Pocket uniformer. I do trimming, flash hole debur, and case mouth chamfer in Lee Zip trim.
hk33ka1 is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2013 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.11236 seconds with 10 queries