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Old December 24, 2010, 04:39 PM   #1
JerryHN
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Rifles with what caliber have the best resale value?

I know I shouldn't think about resale value when buying a new rifle, but I have a habit of thinking way ahead.

I'm thinking about getting another Win M70 Super Grade in 30-06. I assume that rifles in 30-06 have the best resale value since this is one of America's most popular and favorite cartridge.

Anyone agree or disagree?

note: rifle will be used for deer (maybe elk) hunting.
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Old December 24, 2010, 04:40 PM   #2
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30-06 and 270 here
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Old December 24, 2010, 05:15 PM   #3
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I wouldn't worry about the cailber. Rare calibers in the pre-'64 bring a premium. Look at the price of a .358, 9mm, 7x57 or 300 sav in a Model 70.

With that being said, a Model 70 Supergrade is a wonderful rifle. You could do a whole lot worse than a 30-06. If it fits you buy it and go kill a truck load of game. I have never felt lacking with my 70 stainless in 30-06.
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Old December 24, 2010, 05:50 PM   #4
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I would say shoot what ya want, but I think the "best resale" would prolly be a .223
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Old December 24, 2010, 05:52 PM   #5
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Exactly if you aren't willing to invest in rare, antique, and discontinued rifles the reality of a gun ever appreciating in value is very slim. Your every day run of the mill M700, M70 (post 64), and M110/10 will only hold about 75% on average of their orginal value for one in good shape. Your standard hunting calibers will sell easier but that doesn't mean they will hold most of their orginal value.
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Old December 24, 2010, 06:53 PM   #6
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taylor summed it up best I think
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Old December 24, 2010, 09:28 PM   #7
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taylorce1 stated my take on it. The .223 certainly isn't a cartridge I would consider for resale value. At least not a hunting rifle for possible use on elk...

Your choice of a Winchester 70 is a solid choice as well. They are very well built if you're looking to buy the new ones out.
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Old December 24, 2010, 10:15 PM   #8
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Common calibers are easier to sell. Odd ball calibers of which only a few were made will bring more money.

I've bought and sold dozens of rifles over my life and almost always lose money when I bought a new rifle and later sold it.

If I do my research and buy used at a good price, I almost always break even or make money when it comes time to sell or trade.
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Old December 24, 2010, 10:58 PM   #9
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Depends on How Long

A lot depends on how long you plan to keep the rifle/pistol/shotgun before you sell it.

A couple of examples are my Marlin 39A and my S & W K-22. I have owned both for well over 30 years now and both are worth 3-4 times what I gave for them and both were used when purchased. I also have a Franchi 20 guage auto which I bought new (right after they first started importing them) and it is worth quite a bit more than the original price.

Now if you're buying a new .30-06, keep it for a couple years and sell, you're most likely NOT going to break even or make any money.
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Old December 25, 2010, 12:37 AM   #10
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JerryHN:

That is one of the best questions I've seen anywhere about gun markets.

It would be nice to read which military or -styled rifles and calibers hold their values the best.
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Old December 25, 2010, 12:50 AM   #11
DoctorXring
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.


As long as the caliber is not something obscure, I think really good wood
is more important to resale value than caliber per se.

dxr


.
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Old December 25, 2010, 02:21 AM   #12
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Collectibles aside........

Quote:
A lot depends on how long you plan to keep the rifle/pistol/shotgun before you sell it.
Rem 721 in .270 WIN, new in 1950's : $150 ....... 60 years and thousands of rounds later, in only fair shape, it is worth 2-3 times that. (True, inflation has made today's dollar worth less, but still ......)

In the short term, though, I would think caliber has a lot to do with it: some guns will get used to death more than others. Varmint and Bullet-hose caliber rifles get shot quite a lot more than most hunting rifles, which may see a box or two a year. Overbore magnums would wear out sooner, too, I would think. ....... I would never buy a used .220 Swift unless I had a reputable gunsmith check it out thoroughly first...... headspace and throat in particular.
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Old December 25, 2010, 07:55 PM   #13
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resale caliber question

own a small retail gun store, 30-06 hands down,
270 is prolly next in line followed by 243, and 7 mag
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Old December 25, 2010, 08:15 PM   #14
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I know a guy who has a "small gun store". Every used rifle, handgun, etc is marked up 25 to 30 percent over what you can buy the same thing new at Walmart. Well, the rifles and shotguns anyway.
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Old December 25, 2010, 08:47 PM   #15
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Quote:
I know a guy who has a "small gun store". Every used rifle, handgun, etc is marked up 25 to 30 percent over what you can buy the same thing new at Walmart. Well, the rifles and shotguns anyway.
..... and how is the CS at WallyWorld with guns? You have a problem, you are SOL ...... deal with the manufacturer on your own.
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Old December 25, 2010, 10:08 PM   #16
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It really depends on the number of guns chambered in the specific caliber. For instance, the Winchester 94 in .32 Special, T/C Contender barrels in custom calibers, a short special run of almost anything, the Pre-64 Model 70 in .284, Smith and Wesson Revolvers with odd length barrels, etc., etc.

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Old December 25, 2010, 10:45 PM   #17
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I think it would be a toss up between the 30-06 and .270.
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Old December 25, 2010, 10:56 PM   #18
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Quote:
It really depends on the number of guns chambered in the specific caliber. For instance, the Winchester 94 in .32 Special, T/C Contender barrels in custom calibers, a short special run of almost anything, the Pre-64 Model 70 in .284, Smith and Wesson Revolvers with odd length barrels, etc., etc.
Quote:
I think it would be a toss up between the 30-06 and .270.
I think you two are thinking in different directions ........ a7 is thinking in terms of "Collectible Guns" and Joe in terms of "Utility guns" ....... Oddity/Rarity would be a feature in the former case, and bug in the latter.

For a collector, what could be more desirable than something like the Dardick? Conversely, what could be more useless to a shooter?
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Old December 26, 2010, 02:50 PM   #19
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I've got to wonder if some of you guys have actually priced old guns. A 270 or 30-06 are easier to sell quickly as working guns, but hold much less of their value.

Price a few pre-64 Winchester's in 30-06 vs the same gun in 257 Roberts or any of the less common calibers. A 257 Roberts or 220 Swift will easily bring 2 or 3 times as much as a 270 or 30-06. This is simply because they made so many more of them.
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Old December 26, 2010, 04:04 PM   #20
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I've seen my share of high priced .222's recently. It seems the .222 was very popular in the 50's and 60's, then lost ground to the .223 when the armed forces switched over to the .223 AR platforms. I still see high prices on .222 bolt guns though.....sort of s cult following on them.
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Old December 26, 2010, 04:09 PM   #21
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Quote:
I'm thinking about getting another Win M70 Super Grade in 30-06. I assume that rifles in 30-06 have the best resale value since this is one of America's most popular and favorite cartridge.

Anyone agree or disagree?
I agree...and I agree again!
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Old December 26, 2010, 11:03 PM   #22
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....any Mannlicher carbine?

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Old December 27, 2010, 12:03 AM   #23
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Future values of new guns bought really can not be predicted. The area where you are selling the gun has more of an influence on price than almost anything else. I hunt public land and usually ask other hunters what caliber they use when we stop to talk, and 30.06 is really an oddball. I also just recently thinned down on guns and took them to an auction. It was surprising what some of my guns and other people's guns brought at the auction. Judging by the auction results, I don't think you can buy a new gun and predict if it will hold its value.
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