The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > The Smithy

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old November 3, 2010, 03:54 PM   #1
Southern Shooter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 4, 2005
Location: central Louisiana
Posts: 440
Tightening the Lock-up on a revolver...

I am not attempting this myself. I just want to know the procedure of it---

I have an older S&W Model 15 .38 Special and a 1980 Ruger Speed-Six .357 Magnum that have been through several owners and shot a whole bunch. They are beginning to show some signs of a little looseness in the cylinder at the point of lock-up.

What is the procedure that a gunsmith takes to tighten that lock-up on a revolver? And, is it costly?

Thanks
__________________
"My plea is that we stop seeking out the storm and enjoy more fully sunlight. I am suggesting that as we go through life we accentuate the positive. I am asking that we look a little deeper for the good, that we still our voices of insult and sarcasm, that we more generously compliment and endorse virtue and effort." Gordon B. Hinckley

Last edited by Southern Shooter; November 3, 2010 at 04:03 PM.
Southern Shooter is offline  
Old November 3, 2010, 05:25 PM   #2
dahermit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 28, 2006
Location: South Central Michigan...near Ohio, Indiana.
Posts: 3,505
It depends on what you mean by, "cylinder looseness". If you mean end shake, there are shims that will adjust that. However, if you mean that the crane no longer closes all the way...that means it is bent. It would help if you used the correct terms and/or described the problem in more detail.
dahermit is offline  
Old November 3, 2010, 07:49 PM   #3
Southern Shooter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 4, 2005
Location: central Louisiana
Posts: 440
More Specific...

The crane closes all the way very snuggly.

When the trigger is being squeezed all the way back and held tightly...there is still a tad of shake in the cylinder.
__________________
"My plea is that we stop seeking out the storm and enjoy more fully sunlight. I am suggesting that as we go through life we accentuate the positive. I am asking that we look a little deeper for the good, that we still our voices of insult and sarcasm, that we more generously compliment and endorse virtue and effort." Gordon B. Hinckley
Southern Shooter is offline  
Old November 3, 2010, 08:00 PM   #4
7MMGUY
Member
 
Join Date: September 4, 2010
Posts: 78
On the Smith a new cylinder stop and locking bolt should take up some of the play. Not difficult to change. The S&W Revolver shop manual by Jerry Kuhnhausen is a worthwhile investment.
7MMGUY is offline  
Old November 3, 2010, 10:51 PM   #5
James K
Staff
 
Join Date: March 17, 1999
Posts: 19,169
A small amount of perceptible "wiggle" is acceptable in an S&W revolver. I know some folks will go rabidass insane at that statement and want to burn me at the stake, but it is true. So how much is "acceptable"? It is about impossible to describe but anything beyond perceptible is probably too much. The usual fix is a new oversize hand and a new oversize cylinder stop.

Shims will take care of most end shake, but there is a point where that solution no longer works and a new cylinder may be needed, or the gun retired.

Truly, getting to the point of too much "wiggle" or end shake takes a lot of shooting. Your guns may be to that point, but they may not be. I suggest looking at some new and used guns and judge for yourself where your guns fit and how they feel in regard to other guns.

Jim
__________________
Jim K
James K is online now  
Old November 5, 2010, 06:07 PM   #6
g.willikers
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 28, 2008
Posts: 4,879
Since the only thing that really matters is how it shoots.
If it shoots good, then all is well.
g.willikers is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:12 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.07921 seconds with 9 queries