The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > Hogan's Alley > Handguns: The Revolver Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old September 21, 2010, 06:20 AM   #1
therealdeal
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 15, 2010
Posts: 627
.500 Smith&Wesson 7.5" revolver purchase

hi,

I have been contemplating getting a model 629 magnum revolver sometime and/or a ruger super alaskan .44 magnum or .454 casull. I donot want something that crimps. I recently have been reading many threads here and .500 has come up some(sometimes as a joke or to literally answer the power question) with the bear threads. Relax, this isn't a bear thread.lol. however, I am now considering buying a S&W .500 revolver. I already have 2 revolvers: CCW one is Taurus CIA650 .357 5shot and my other one is my ruger gp100 .357 6shot(ps- we own a mossberg 500 shotgun too which holds 7 in the tube while one is in the chamber and I plan on buying the .44 bigboy henry rifle and/or the 30-30 marlin rifle also).

Its not because of mistaken overkill that I want this .500 revolver, and I know the rounds are expensive. I want the 440gr and I saw they're going on the high 40's for 20shots. I plan on shooting a bunch of shots and just having leftover rounds(like maybe spend a c-note on rounds and make sure to save a bunch). anyways, I want this revolver and am asking if anyone has experience good or bad with it(or the .454 or even the .44 who has some good advice for me or just wants to say whatever about anyone of them such as defects of character, preferences, etc.)?? very much appreciated.

lastly, I read some reviews: google .500 S&W revolver and the guy said that it didn't hurt not one of his friends to shoot(see attached link). he said it was easy to shoot and grip and that any firearms person who pretty much knew how to shoot(or a little closer to very knowledgeable) would have no problems shooting it. barrel length opinions will help if I get any response on this too and I have only seen the 10" and 7.5" so far. It looked like the 7.5was a 5shot but I thought this weapon was a sixer and thats what I prefer?


http://www.gunblast.com/SW_500.htm

ps-I am not made of money, and I realized when I mentioned the rifles too my wife Might not like this new hobby(or I should say old hobby that seems to be growing)
__________________
NRA Distinguished Life Member

"Abraham Lincoln freed all men, but Sam Colt made them all equal." (post Civil War slogan)

Last edited by therealdeal; September 21, 2010 at 06:26 AM.
therealdeal is offline  
Old September 21, 2010, 07:01 AM   #2
GeauxTide
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 20, 2009
Location: Helena, AL
Posts: 3,070
With the handguns you have, I'd start with a 44mag. The recoil facts are:

A 3#, 357 revolver, pushing 158s @ 1100 will give you 9.5fps of recoil velocity and 4.2 foot pounds of recoil energy. A 5#, 500 Smith, pushing 440s @ 1600 will give you 22.8fps of recoil velocity and 40.6 foot pounds of recoil energy. If you can handle twice the recoil, great. If you haven't spend much time with large caliber revolvers, start with a 45 Colt or 44 Mag.
GeauxTide is offline  
Old September 21, 2010, 08:57 AM   #3
therealdeal
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 15, 2010
Posts: 627
I deal w/higher recoil shotgun shells+3" 00's and dont mind getting bruises. I know they like it rough and the shooting even 8shots all in a row while practicing doesn't bother me. I know this is a shotgun and not a revolver, but I tend to believe the article(from the link provided). I have heard the opposite about the .454 casull ruger super redhawk alaskan. I heard that can be a problem.

I got wordy in the original post(not the first time and not the last), and I think honestly I am going to get the .500. I just need someone to step up and tell me if this is a bad decision. I plan on shooting it whenever not just for hunting, and wouldn't hesitate in a home defense situation(hopefully that doesn't happen) and whenever else. I am also wondering why more people don't own it, but the .44 is so popluar? I do love the .357, but anything else I buy at this point is more than I need anyways(except the 30-30 hunting rifle). well I guess the .500 can be my hunting weapon too.lol

is the .500 a worthwhile revolver?

thanx for your reply too Geauxtide; I appreciate it.
__________________
NRA Distinguished Life Member

"Abraham Lincoln freed all men, but Sam Colt made them all equal." (post Civil War slogan)
therealdeal is offline  
Old September 21, 2010, 10:16 AM   #4
dawico
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 18, 2009
Location: Lampasas, TX
Posts: 326
In my opinion, the 44 magnum is in a whole different world than the 454 Casull and the 500 magnum. The 44 has a lot more ammo/ recoil options, with cowboy 44 specials to Bullalo 300+ grain ammo. I can shoot a 44 magnum all day with no ill effects from recoil with factory full power 240 grain bullets in my 629 Pro Hunter. With the 454 or 500, I can only shoot about 60 to 100 rounds before my hand hurts and a minor flinch starts to develope. The 454 Casull has alot of options also, from 45 Colt to full power loads, but is more expensive to feed. I have heard of 500 Special loads, but have never seen any.

I have a S&W 500 Magnum with the 8 3/8" barrel and the 629 44 Magnum Pro Hunter. I had a Ruger Super RedHawk with the 7 1/2" barrel in 454 Casull. I liked the gun, but after getting the 500, I didn't see the need for a middle caliber. The 454s recoil was the same if not worse than the 500s. It seemed 'snappier'. It could be the guns, the compensator on the 500, or any thing else, but the 500 seems to have more of a push to it, where as the 454 had alot of snap to it.

It sounds to me like you want a 500. The 8 3/8" barrel seems to me to be the best option for this gun, and the S&W I own is a great gun. It is a five shot revolver. Go ahead and get one and enjoy.

On a side note, these 'specialty' rounds is where reloading really pays off. You will save a lot of money rolling your own for this gun, plus you can down load it if you see fit.
dawico is offline  
Old September 21, 2010, 10:30 AM   #5
therealdeal
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 15, 2010
Posts: 627
thanx dawico, I just got off the phone w/this guy&he is getting some prices and barrel sizes+getting back to me. I think you answered my question, this puppy only comes in 5shot(I had thought I saw a 6shot 10" barrel). I saw the 7.5" and didn't want the 10". I am going to take your advice and get the 8 3/8barrel. its a good compromise, would help w/hunting, and the size of this puppy seems to demand it. I also never liked going under 6" anyways. I only made an exception for my CCW. yes, I will look into reloading too. what rounds do you use?? I am planning on the 440; is that the highest? I think like you, why go in the middle. I don't shoot 38's out of my .357 and I willnot shoot specials out of my .44 or out of my .500(maybe someday I'll become more flexible). I do shoot the 125gr hollows for my .357 but I guess thats the popular choice and I dont want my cia650 to crimp(it did that for the 1st couple cyclinders I ever shot out of it--hasnt ever happened since)
__________________
NRA Distinguished Life Member

"Abraham Lincoln freed all men, but Sam Colt made them all equal." (post Civil War slogan)
therealdeal is offline  
Old September 21, 2010, 10:44 AM   #6
dawico
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 18, 2009
Location: Lampasas, TX
Posts: 326
Hornady has a 500 grain round available, as well as a 350 grainer and the 300 grain flex tip bullet. I also know of people handloading homemade cast bullets of up to 720 grains. I guess the extra length of the cylinder allows these to fit without taking up too much powder space.
dawico is offline  
Old September 21, 2010, 10:59 AM   #7
therealdeal
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 15, 2010
Posts: 627
is that what you mean by reloading?? people save the old casings right and then I pay someone cheaper to 'reload' w/720gr OR a lesser, more common amount?
__________________
NRA Distinguished Life Member

"Abraham Lincoln freed all men, but Sam Colt made them all equal." (post Civil War slogan)
therealdeal is offline  
Old September 21, 2010, 11:12 AM   #8
therealdeal
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 15, 2010
Posts: 627
he just called, 50bucks more for the compensator. I told him I want that one. obviously have to go in before its doen deal but just wanted to be sure, is this the way to go? whats the deal w/the compensator dawico? how does it look?
__________________
NRA Distinguished Life Member

"Abraham Lincoln freed all men, but Sam Colt made them all equal." (post Civil War slogan)
therealdeal is offline  
Old September 21, 2010, 11:49 AM   #9
Doodlebugger45
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 15, 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 1,717
I have some large caliber revolvers and like them a lot. I started the big bore experience with a 629 and loved it. Now I have a couple of 44 mags, a .454 Casull, and a .480 Ruger and I like all of them a lot. I toyed with the idea of getting a .460 or a .500 mag several years ago, but so far I haven't done it. Most of the revolvers in those 2 calibers have compensators and people will tell you that the recoil isn't bad. I shot the .460 mag a friend had and it's true that the recoil isn't bad with his long barrel and compensator.

But I have 2 reasons why I haven't taken the plunge into the .460 or .500 mags yet. Have you ever shot one of those with the compensator? Yes, it dampens the recoil just fine. But the muzzle blast is even more intense. I had very good hearing protection when I shot the .460, but with each shot it felt like someone was hitting me in the nose, that pressure wave is so strong.

That isn't the big problem though with those revolvers. Sure, at the range with good hearing protection, they are just fine. I still might get one someday as a range toy. But if you are ever in a situation where you fire it without hearing protection, either hunting or self-defense, it will indeed give you permanent hearing damage. I attended a S&W factory rep's presentation when they first came out and he stressed that fact. The nerve damage is forever. I have fired my BFR in .480 Ruger without hearing protection (just once when elk hunting). It wasn't a good sound. My ears rang for a couple days but it went away I guess. I have not fired the .454 without hearing protection. Not a good idea. It has a different sound than the .480 Ruger. Seems higher pitched to me with ear muffs on.

Bottom line to me was that the sound from the .460 or .500 made it impractical to me for anything other than a range toy (not that there isn't room for that!). If I ever used it for bear protection though, the odds are good that I wouldn't take time to put on the ear muffs in the middle of the night. I guess I would prefer to be deaf rather than bear chow, but my other revolvers will get the job done if that's the only option.

Personally, for me, if I need something bigger than the .454 or .480 then I will shoot a rifle.

Not trying to dissuade you by any means, and there's a chance I might have one myself someday. Just know that there is more to the beast than mere recoil to your wrist. If I get one, I will stick with the BFR platform like I have for my .480 and .454. Those suckers are very sweet.

I hope you reload if you get one. That is the only way I can afford to shoot the .480 and .454 on a regular basis. They cost about the same as a .44 mag to reload, maybe just slightly more for the better bullets. The cost factor is just as important with the .460 or .500. It would be a shame to spend that much on a fine revolver and only be able to shoot it 100 times a year because of the ammo cost.
Doodlebugger45 is offline  
Old September 21, 2010, 12:36 PM   #10
davlandrum
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 27, 2006
Location: Lane County Oregon
Posts: 2,547
I almost bought the .500 for deer hunting (and possible elk), but after some email exchanges with people who had shot both the .500 and .460 extensively went with the .460. I have been extremely happy with my decision. The .460 give you a ton of flexibility in terms of .45 Colt, .454 Casull, or .460 ammo. If you already reload, then you can tailor your power levels, but I am just starting to reload, so wanted a variety of factory ammo. Shooting factory .45 colt out of the beast (I have the 8 3/8 barrel) is FUN - no recoil to speak of. I did not find any factory .454 Casull that I enjoyed shooting, very "snappy" recoil (same thing I perceive when shooting my buddy's .40 semi - ick). Hornady .460 ammo is a big boom, but more push than snap. I like it!

I would make the same decision again.
__________________
U.S Army, Retired

Ethics is knowing the difference between what you have a right to do and what is right to do. -Potter Stewart
davlandrum is offline  
Old September 21, 2010, 02:21 PM   #11
Dave R
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 7, 2000
Location: Idaho
Posts: 6,073
Quote:
is that what you mean by reloading?? people save the old casings right and then I pay someone cheaper to 'reload' w/720gr OR a lesser, more common amount?
Close. I'm speaking for him, but I think what he means is you save the empties and YOU reload them with new primer, powder an bullets. It gives you the flexibility to load light for practice (very low recoil) and heavy for hunting or fun. Check out our reloading forum here, especially the stickies at the top.

Reloading should save you 60%-75% of the cost of factory ammo, for the 500S&W. It costs about $250 in equipment to get started.

I started reloading about 10 years ago, and wish I had started 10 before that. It really magnifies my enjoymnet of the sport, beyond just saving money.
__________________
I am Pro-Rights (on gun issues).
Dave R is offline  
Old September 22, 2010, 10:17 AM   #12
therealdeal
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 15, 2010
Posts: 627
thanx dave. I would be interested in getting into this eventually
__________________
NRA Distinguished Life Member

"Abraham Lincoln freed all men, but Sam Colt made them all equal." (post Civil War slogan)
therealdeal is offline  
Old September 22, 2010, 10:44 AM   #13
TheGoldenState
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 8, 2010
Posts: 1,191
Well, I can only speak on the .500

I have the 4 inch with compensator, the only mistake, as I cant put a glass on it and go hunting, but youre talking the longer barrel so thats great.

I use the .400 grn Corbon, has a TON of recoil and after a cylinder your hands/wrists are dead (but again, my experience is with the 4inch). Ive been shooting since I was 6, in reference to your posts about it being easy to shoot if you know how. After a few outting the gun becomes, a show piece. Something fun to let your buddies shoot once or twice and you'll get a ton of spectators. Grip feels good tho, very accurate, no problems what so ever.

I only recommend you get the longer barrel, 8 3/8 in. unless you just want something to explode things every once in awhile and a side arm for "dangerous game."
__________________
The Day You Get Comfortable Is The Day You Get Careless...
TheGoldenState is offline  
Old September 22, 2010, 10:45 AM   #14
EdInk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 27, 2009
Posts: 3,967
Probably get more use out of the 44 mag BUT the cool factor of the 500 is second to none.
__________________
Sic Semper Tyrannis
EdInk is offline  
Old September 22, 2010, 12:45 PM   #15
Tom C.
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 18, 2002
Location: Southern Maryland
Posts: 249
I have three of the .500 monsters: a standard 4”, a 5” JRS and a 6 ½” PC Hunter. The 4” and 5” are carry guns for that very rough neighborhood where brer bear lives. The PC Hunter has a built in Weaver base and is fitted with a 2x Weaver scope in Warne QD mounts.

Shooting factory ammo in these things will break the bank pretty quickly. It will also beat you to death just as quickly. Handloading can make the cost reasonable and can also take care of the recoil issue. I tend to shoot fairly inexpensive lead bullets in mine with mild loads of things like Universal Clays. Nice accuracy without the recoil and noise of full power factory loads. I also tend to shoot with bicycling gloves. They take the sting out of the hotter loads. If you want to pay for it, less than full power ammo is available from several sources, but it is still expensive.

Did they mention that these things are loud? With the muzzle brake and full power ammo, you can clean out the line at the range fast. No one else will want to be anywhere near you when you torch off that monster.

Perhaps you want to consider something milder to start with?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_4249.jpg (236.1 KB, 24 views)
__________________
Tom
Tom C. is offline  
Reply

Tags
.500 , handgun , large , revolver , smith & wesson

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.10579 seconds with 10 queries