The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Conference Center > General Discussion Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old July 6, 2010, 02:42 AM   #26
kadima
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 21, 2010
Posts: 190
Quote:
Quote:
I learned about weapons while doing my compulsory service in the army (20 years ago, not so far...) and the first weapons I've ever fired were a Garand, an MG42/59 and a Beretta 9mm. No .22....
Joining the army to get access to free ammo seems a bit extreme. If that's not an option, then a 22 is the way to go. Learn how to shoot with low cost ammo and no recoil to deal with. Then go to centerfire.
ROFL!!!!!

What I was pointing is that even young one can start (if finds a good instructor) with larger calibers.
Life is too short to fire boring ammo (I'd rather shoot 50 good 9mm per session than a couple hundred .22, but it's my personal taste and, as we say de gustibus non desputandum est)

K.

Last edited by kadima; July 6, 2010 at 03:59 AM. Reason: really bad typing... must have been the Chianti...
kadima is offline  
Old July 6, 2010, 06:50 AM   #27
hardluk1
Junior member
 
Join Date: March 27, 2009
Posts: 600
I have never seen a shooter that was so good he had moved beyond a 22. Even some of the best shooters in the world still shoot in the 22 matches. But you are in school and probably can't carry anywhere except hunting and you did not say you did that, with home defence as a worry then buy a shotgun and join a sporting clays club.
hardluk1 is offline  
Old July 6, 2010, 07:20 AM   #28
winkytink
Member
 
Join Date: February 7, 2010
Posts: 93
Donnybru, just remember that whichever gun you choose it's unlikely to be your "one and only", so don't stress over it too much. Buy something cheap and fun to start out with and then trade up in a few months.
winkytink is offline  
Old July 6, 2010, 08:55 AM   #29
booker_t
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 21, 2009
Posts: 797
Another +1 for the .22 rimfire to start. Learn your safety procedures and get your basics down, learn from a good instructor and be patient. It'll pay dividends in the long run.

First purchase I would suggest a .22LR or .22WMR rifle, preferably bolt action. Personally I really like the WMR, although ammo is a bit more pricey ($0.15-0.18/round as opposed to $0.03-0.10/round). The .22WMR is effective on small animals out to about 125-150 yards, and would kill a deer with a headshot at 75 yards, maybe 100-125 if properly placed. I've achieved some relatively tight groups at 200-250 yards off a rest as well, although the energy delivered at that range is just enough to put a hole in the target so it's academic, but fun. The standard .22LR is at the tail end of it's ballistics at 115-125 yards. (at least, that's my understanding, if there's an expert around feel free to correct me)

My .22WMR is a Marlin 983S bolt action. Stainless bull barrel, 14rd tube magazine, iron sights but will accept a scope. Laminated stock but it's pretty and durable. Paid $200 cash and it came with a sling, 4x30 scope, bore snake, and about 150rounds of ammo. You can shoot it all day, from a rest or offhand, and have a blast without beating up your shoulder. There are a ton of .22LR options, Ruger 10/22 semiauto is probably the most popular. Marlin makes a Papoose survival rifle that is really slick, it breaks down and can be carried in a backpack. Worth checking out.

Pistol, I suggest a Ruger Mark III Target .22LR. There are others that are just as good, but I like that one personally. Adjustable rear sight and bull barrel. Under $500 new with 4 mags, cleaning rod and case.

Whatever you buy, try to invest in professional instruction beyond anything else. Take a safety course and pay attention. If possible, find an instructor who is NRA certified, or shot/shoots competitively.

Regarding your law enforcement aspirations, quite frankly firearms proficiency, while important, shouldn't be your primary focus as you prepare for that career. Education and physical fitness should be high on your list. Run, do pushups/situps/pullups, work on your quickness and agility. Google "Stew Smith" and download some of his workouts.

Last edited by booker_t; July 7, 2010 at 06:53 AM.
booker_t is offline  
Old July 6, 2010, 07:21 PM   #30
hardluk1
Junior member
 
Join Date: March 27, 2009
Posts: 600
donnybru If you still think you have grown beyond a 22 check out the( beyond a 22) tread and see the reply's. Should give you something to think about.
hardluk1 is offline  
Old July 7, 2010, 06:47 AM   #31
booker_t
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 21, 2009
Posts: 797
Oh, and while this isn't firearms-related, I'm going to put it out there regarding your law enforcement career aspirations:

If you know what geographical location you intend to live/work in, do some research and determine what the best 2nd language to learn would be... whether it's spanish, japanese, russian, farsi, etc. You don't have to be fluent but proficiency will make you that much more valuable to your department. And unlike your pistol craft, I guarentee you'll use those language skills nearly every day.

Learning to shoot is relatively easy, and it's fun. Learning a language, a professional discipline (such as engineering or finance) and putting in consistent hard work at the gym/track/pool, is not as much fun but will put you in a better place when you're looking for employment, be it at the local, state, or Federal level. Determine your goals 10-15 years out, list what it will take to achieve those goals (3 areas: education, training, experience) and create a timeline/roadmap for yourself to get there. Then do it, and enjoy it, without complaint or excuses, because afterall it is the path you chose for yourself.

Last edited by booker_t; July 7, 2010 at 07:11 AM.
booker_t is offline  
Old July 7, 2010, 01:29 PM   #32
Donnybru
Junior Member
 
Join Date: July 4, 2010
Posts: 6
I continue to appreciate all your suggestions. Thank you all so much I would also like to let those of you that mentioned a 2nd language know that I am currently working towards becoming fluent in Spanish, Farsi, and Chinese, and have been working towards that for quite a while.

As for which branch of law enforcement, I am seriously considering the FBI.

And for a quick gun update: I went to the range on Monday and shot both the Glock 17 and SIG P226. I very much enjoy the SIG. It's extremely accurate and well built. I suffered no malfunctions with it. I went back to the range yesterday (Tuesday) and shot a few hundred rounds through the SIG, doing tactical drills and such. It was great.

That's all for now, though as I've said before, I appreciate all your suggestions since you all know much more than I do.
Donnybru is offline  
Old July 7, 2010, 02:01 PM   #33
jg0001
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 24, 2007
Posts: 551
Definitely NO on the shotgun. Your intended initial purpose of target practice isn't going to be very exciting with the shotty, unless you intended to do clays. For just putting holes in paper, I'd be split between a handgun or a rifle, but would suggest that whatever you get, you ALSO get a 22LR rifle. Perhaps a 9mm handgun (ammo is CHEAPER for that than for ANY other centerfire ammo, for a handgun or a rifle) AND a 22LR S&W M&P 15-22. Those two put together give you hours of fun at the range at a reasonable price.
jg0001 is offline  
Old July 7, 2010, 02:16 PM   #34
booker_t
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 21, 2009
Posts: 797
Donny, FBI is an excellent objective.

Let me say that the language will help you, but it can also pigeonhole you, so it may or may not be the best track into FBI (althoug it's definitely worth learning as I say). There are several tracks into being an 1811 Special Agent and language is one of them, as is finance/economics, engineering/science, diversified, and a few others.

Typically, the FBI wants their applicants to make something of themselves in a field before they apply. Get your Bachelor's degree, then at least 3 years of professional experience. Try to pick up a masters part-time while you're working. If you want to work white collar crimes, then working at a large bank or financial institution is the way to go. If you want to work forensics, then a medical/science degree and work experience is best. Typical range of ages for new SAs I believe is 27-34 years old. First check out the website, there's a ton of information about the requirements and application process. Then if need be, call your local Field Office and ask to speak with a recruiter or Application Coordinator, they can give you additional information.

Generally, if FBI is your goal, then keep it in mind with every decision you make from now until you're in your mid-20s. No DUIs, no drugs, document your foreign travel, keep your nose clean and stay squared away physically. The application and vetting process can take from 4 months to as long as 2 years, but be patient and if it's meant to be, it will happen. A large number of highly qualified applicants fail the polygraph and unfortunately, that's just the way it goes. But, don't try to beat the poly, don't research it, it'll only hurt you when the time comes. Best of luck.
booker_t is offline  
Old July 7, 2010, 03:06 PM   #35
Donnybru
Junior Member
 
Join Date: July 4, 2010
Posts: 6
My hope is to eventually work in the NCAVC in Quantico, though I realize that this is a very sought-after position. As for a major and minor in college, I was thinking of majoring in Psychology and minoring in Business. Or possibly double majoring in Psychology/Sociology and double minoring in Business/Criminology (but that's only if I plan on having no life ) And a BA/Masters in Psychology as well.

Regarding the 3 years of work required by the FBI prior to admission, I was thinking perhaps a firearms specialist in a crime lab. However, I believe I would need a more specialized degree(s) in order to fill that position.
Donnybru is offline  
Old July 7, 2010, 03:21 PM   #36
flight954
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 1, 2006
Location: Cypress, Texas
Posts: 933
Ruger 10/22 22lr
Ammo is inexpensive
Tons of mod options
A treat to shoot
flight954 is offline  
Old July 7, 2010, 04:27 PM   #37
aarondhgraham
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 1, 2009
Location: Stillwater, OKlahoma
Posts: 7,056
A good .22 rifle and a good .22 pistol,,,

My friend, the whole purpose of your first gun(s) will be to learn,,,
Buy any centerfire gun and you limit your learning by the cost of ammunition.

My suggestion is a .22 semi-auto rifle,,,
And a .22 handgun be it a revolver or semi-auto,,,
This will not cost you too much money and the ammo is cheap.

I recommend a Ruger 10/22 rifle ($200.00 bucks),,,
Or a Mossberg 702 Plinkster ($129.00),,,
Or a Marlin Model 60 ($145.00)

Then consider a Ruger 22/45 for a handgun ($239.00),,,
Or a Ruger Mk III ($329.00) in one of the many configurations,,,
And you don't have to go the ultra-tricked out versions of them either.

I own some seriously fine handguns in my cabinet,,,
But the pistol I have the most fun with is the basic 22/45,,,
And it's a wonderful trainer for serious practice with seriously cheap ammo.

Get the basic versions that won't break your bank,,,
Later there will be plenty of time for the super-spiffy wonder guns

Your goal should be to shoot a lot of bullets,,,
Learn the basics of good technique,,,
And have tons of fun!

You can do a whole lot more of those shooting actions,,,
At 3-4 cents a round than at 20-30 cents a round.

I guarantee if you walk out to your shooting spot,,,
Sporting a 10-22 rifle and a 22/45 pistol,,,
You will walk tall and have tons of fun.

.
__________________
Caje: The coward dies a thousand times, the brave only once.
Kirby: That's about all it takes, ain't it?
Combat: "A Silent Cry"
Aarond is good,,, Aarond is wise,,, Always trust Aarond! (most of the time)
aarondhgraham is offline  
Old July 7, 2010, 04:46 PM   #38
shafter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 23, 2009
Posts: 1,119
I'd recommend a Ruger 10/22. Awesome firearm for the money.
shafter is offline  
Old July 7, 2010, 06:57 PM   #39
BerettaCougar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 7, 2005
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,226
Why do people keep suggesting 22lr?

22lr was not even in the options he posted. If you like 22lr, good for you. I have a few 22's and they are extremely boring and serve no purpose (to me).

To the thread originator: As I posted before.

1.) Go to a gun dealer and see what best fits in your hand/shoulder.
2.) Rent the gun you like and test fire it. if possible...
3.) Buy what best fits your hand and what you feel most comfortable shooting.

Comfort is a measure of not only the overall feel of the gun but also the recoil and the cost of using and keeping the gun. Test fire as many different calibers as you can in as many different model firearms as you can. You'll find your perfect fit.
BerettaCougar is offline  
Old July 7, 2010, 08:56 PM   #40
jg0001
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 24, 2007
Posts: 551
Quote:
Why do people keep suggesting 22lr?
Perhaps many of us were in his shoes asking the same questions back when we started our own collections, only to end up years later spending a lot of our time with later acquired 22's.

I still say to get at least a 9mm to get that itch scratched, but to get a 22LR as well to lessen the overall cost of any given range trip.

At the very least, he owes it to himself to research AMMO costs as much as anything else.
jg0001 is offline  
Old July 8, 2010, 04:36 AM   #41
kadima
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 21, 2010
Posts: 190
Re. working experience, why not the Armed Forces?

I am just guessing, since I am typing from Europe, but you make some experiences that cannot be made anywhere else, keep fit, get a training, somemoney, too and if I remember correctly there are some advantages in joining a postgraduate course afterwards.

I was a part time army officer during my undergraduate course, it took a couple of year more to get my degree but it was well worth....


K. (now an MD)
kadima is offline  
Old July 8, 2010, 07:00 AM   #42
roy reali
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 23, 2005
Posts: 3,248
Safety Issue?

My dad would only allow me to have a shotgun for my first "real" firearm. His reason was safety. Yes, he did teach me all the safety rules and he wasn't afraid to remind me of them with his boot. Yet, he also knew that as a young shooter with a new "toy", youthful excitement sometimes overrode common sense.

With a shotgun using birdshot, there is less down range danger. Birdshot has a very limited long range danger. A .22 rifle is capable of hurting or killing someone much further.

I do think that shotguns make an ideal first gun.
roy reali is offline  
Old July 8, 2010, 09:01 AM   #43
DanThaMan1776
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 2, 2010
Location: Illinois
Posts: 395
Well for starters you have to be 21 for a pistol. So that narrows it down in rifle or shotgun. I would do a rifle in a relatively small caliber or 22 lr. The principles of marksmanship can be learned and they are better plinkers than shotguns.
__________________
Amateurs think equipment,
Students think techniques,
Experts think tactics.
DanThaMan1776 is offline  
Old July 8, 2010, 01:12 PM   #44
hardluk1
Junior member
 
Join Date: March 27, 2009
Posts: 600
berettacougar A 22 should be on his list. Just doesn't release it. Know one is to good not to own an shoot one. donnybru mentioned the fbi. We have built to homes for fbi retired and both of them practice with 22 version of there old carry gun , do have there own carry guns but maybe oddly nether own a ar still rifle. Bolt rifle enstead.. This guy is a student first and will have some years to work into a centefire. If he"s looking for a home defence gun a 22 will work but that is where a shotgun would be a cheaper weapon and can serve multi rolls is a short barrel for home and long on a sporting clay course. Not skeet/trap. Anyone that has not tried that give it a shoot, don't come natural to many. Kills me, no talent there. He can always buy a center fire and that should be totaly his choice of brand and model along with rifle.
hardluk1 is offline  
Reply

Tags
beginner , firearm , handgun , rifle , shotgun

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.11923 seconds with 9 queries