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Old March 7, 2010, 02:01 PM   #1
kreiderm
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How old for a good used 870?

I want to buy a good used 870. I dont want the plastic parts in the new guns. How far back should I go and how do I identify the age of the gun?
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Old March 7, 2010, 03:41 PM   #2
the rifleer
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I'd say at least 15 years or so, 20 to be safe. I don't know when they started using plastic parts, but that's about when Remington's quality started plunging.
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Old March 8, 2010, 10:04 AM   #3
kreiderm
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How do I determine it's age?
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Old March 8, 2010, 11:03 AM   #4
Edward429451
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Look for the solid shell lifters
The new ones have a slot in them
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Old March 8, 2010, 11:13 AM   #5
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You have to buy a secret decoder ring to tell the age using the barrel codes.

http://www.remingtonsociety.com/ques...ACKPOWDERX.htm
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Old March 8, 2010, 06:23 PM   #6
Spartan23
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Well, i am not a rich person, i am actually bellow the average of that degrees, but a 870 is not actually that expensive.

I am saying that, because you can be sure with an used gun. How the previous owner treated it? What did he shoot with it?
And a whole bunch of other stuff.


But if the offer for the used one is really good, just make sure you will do a full field strip before you buy, after determine the age of gun.
Closely check all parts, even use a magnify glass if need.

Also, you can take a dummy bullet to test its function.


By the way, dose the previous owner have not any paper that tells when hi bought the gun?
I mean, there should be papers mentioning the guns serial, right?
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Old March 8, 2010, 06:31 PM   #7
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Spartan, i think the OP intended to glean info as to when the Wingmaster started to lose that "fine arms" quality they used to be known for. ie: pre-holdings co. days...

Quote:
By the way, dose the previous owner have not any paper that tells when hi bought the gun?
I mean, there should be papers mentioning the guns serial, right?
Why? No guns I buy will come with box or papers if I sell it... Them are trash once I get them home. A good visual inspection is all one needs to determine if the gun was or wasn't abused.
Brent
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Old March 8, 2010, 06:58 PM   #8
Scattergun Bob
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kreiderm

I am a little confused Remington WINGMASTER 870 shotguns have few if any plastic parts, with the exception of the trigger plate assembly. I actualy believe that the plastic (poly -e - mire) trigger plate is an improvement over the aluminum one.

If you just have too, a general rule would be look for a 870 without the flextab system, the little "U" shaped cut on the shell carrier (lifter). That should put you in the right place.

Sometimes, what you read on forums and the "great Chevy vrs Ford 870 vrs 500 debate" tend to cloud reality. In general the 870 in the Wingmaster configuration is as solid as ever, and holds it's own with any current pump made. I will stake what little reputation I have on that statment.
Good Luck & Be Safe
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Old March 8, 2010, 10:28 PM   #9
kreiderm
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I am not really looking for a Wingmaster, but a base model for my son. I have read that the new 870 express is poorer quality than the older guns. This is why I am interested in a used gun. Good price and good quality. The solid lifter hint is what I was looking for, thanks.

Just out of curiousity, why do you think the plastic trigger plate is better than aluminum?

Last edited by kreiderm; March 8, 2010 at 10:36 PM.
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Old March 9, 2010, 12:20 AM   #10
Regolith
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Quote:
I am not really looking for a Wingmaster, but a base model for my son. I have read that the new 870 express is poorer quality than the older guns. This is why I am interested in a used gun. Good price and good quality. The solid lifter hint is what I was looking for, thanks.
I have a newer 870 Express, and the only complaint I have with it is the finish. It's rough instead of smooth, and is a bit difficult to clean. Otherwise, it's pretty solidly built.


Quote:
Just out of curiousity, why do you think the plastic trigger plate is better than aluminum?
I've never owned one of the older 870s, so I don't know what the aluminum trigger guards were like, but the plastic trigger guard on the new 870s is solid. Solid enough that I thought it was steel at first. I'd bet that if you load tested the plastic versus the aluminum, the aluminum would fail first. It is definitely NOT cheap plastic.
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Old March 9, 2010, 07:19 PM   #11
Dave McC
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I've never, ever heard of the plastic TG causing any probs, and considering I run three shotgun BBs and am known as an 870 fanatic, I'd hear about any.

As for the "Junk" rep newer Expresses have.....

Every one I've seen and shot functions perfectly after a little chamber polishing,at most. Sample size, maybe 20, Ammo selection may be crucial. Some cheap steel based hulls will gag most anything.

While QC went south a bit, it seems to have regained some priority with the company.

The only quibble I have is with the barrels. They run heavier than the old ones or the LC variants I prefer. That much weight forward slows the swing for me. YMMV.

And a lot of complaints I hear about the Express are from folks that do not have that much shotgun experience. Cogniscienti seem to have little trouble working the Express.

HTH....
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Old March 9, 2010, 08:05 PM   #12
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I have an 870 I bought in 1989. The receiver is marked "870 Magnum". Was this built like the newer Police Magnums or like the Express model?
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Old March 9, 2010, 11:30 PM   #13
Lee Lapin
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In shopping for a used Express gun, I no longer even look at those made since the shift to magazine tube dimples. You know how to conduct the basic inspection- outside, bore, what you can see and feel of the action without taking anything down.

Then ask the dealer if you can unscrew the magazine cap first. Let them do it if they'd rather. Start unscrewing the magazine cap, and if you hear a clack-clack-clack, stop, tighten back up on the mag cap and put it back on the rack. That's the sound of the plastic mag cap retainer doing its thing. If you get the cap off and see a toothy plastic insert in the end of the mag tube, put the cap back on and keep looking.

No noise likely means it's an older gun. when you remove the magazine cap, look for the detent in the barrel ring. If you see it, that's a good sign. Push up the lifter and look at the front of the trigger plate assy at the back of the loading port- you should see two light colored rectangles which indicate the trigger plate is aluminum. Look at the extractor- if you see mold marks, it's MIM. If you see tool marks, it's machined. You want machined for an older Express gun, but it's an easy and pretty inexpensive replacement ($8 IIRC) if everything else is looking good, and I have yet to break an MIM extractor so far.

With 870s, the most likely no-sale abuse is bubba-ing from the kind of owner who can't resist taking apart things that were never meant to be disassembled by the owner. You need to know the design well enough to tell when gunbutchery has been committed, and you need to have permission from the dealer to pull the trigger plate assembly for inspection.

Beyond that there shouldn't be any trouble in picking out a good one...

fwiw,

lpl
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Old March 9, 2010, 11:44 PM   #14
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The only problems with the newer Express manufactured in about the last 6 years is some have rough and or tight under size chambers. A good chamber polish takes care of that. Also the Tactical Express with the gray powder coat finish has had problem with the finish chipping.

The newer 870 defense shotguns now have heavier larger diameter 18.5" barrels instead of the older length of 18.125". The 18.5" length is good because the factory tube extension fits flush with the muzzle instead of extending past it on the okder shorter length..


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