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Old January 23, 2010, 05:06 PM   #1
Horntord
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Turkey Chokes

I was at Bass Pro and found a Undertaker Ported Super Full Turkey Choke Tube for my MossBERG 500, has anyone used this choke and does it work. The other question is what does (FOR LEAD AND COPPER PLATED LEAD SHOT MEAN) I was going to use just plain old Windchester #6 shot.
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Old January 23, 2010, 06:10 PM   #2
zippy13
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Quote:
The other question is what does (FOR LEAD AND COPPER PLATED LEAD SHOT MEAN) I was going to use just plain old Windchester #6 shot.
Don't use steel short nor slugs. Your Winchester #6 lead shot will be fine.
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Old January 23, 2010, 07:11 PM   #3
LaserSpot
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I tried a couple Cabela's brand choke tubes last year with a couple different types of lead shot. The super-full patterned tighter than the extra-full tube. I didn't pay extra for the ported tubes, doubt it makes much difference.

The biggest surprise was when I tried Remington #5 buffered lead turkey loads. They patterned much tighter than the Winchester #6 plain lead turkey loads; gave me at least an extra 10 yards range.

Also found out that tubes for my Mossberg 500 are threaded the same as Winchester, Weatherby, and Browning Invector (not invector plus) tubes.
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Old January 23, 2010, 10:02 PM   #4
bamaranger
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experiment

Guns and tubes are ticky, and I'd experiment a little and see what your gun might like best by shooting some patterns.

Not only will you find out how your gun patterns, w/ different loads, but you'll determine if it shoots to point of aim. Many do not.

Usually you can find some guys who shoot different loads and swap a few back and forth, w/o dumping a bunch of cash on 10 rd boxes. I found my go to load that very way.

Two oz of #6 is a standard load and popular. Lots of pellets usually means denser patterns, but not always. I shot #6 for years, but have switched to #5, having found a load that patterns as well as #6, but does it w/ bigger, heavier #5, which I believe adds range and power/penetration. In turkey hunting, every little bit counts! Bigger #4 shot, used by some guys, has never shot tight enough to suit me.

Get you a biggin' this spring!
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Old January 23, 2010, 11:18 PM   #5
Horntord
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First and formost thanks for your reprys

I have always use 2 3/4" with the new shot shells out now should I go to 3" shells (no mag) and what's this NItro type shot?
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Old January 24, 2010, 12:08 AM   #6
LaserSpot
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I was shooting 3" shells; the Remington #5 buffered loads put more pellets on the target than the Winchester #6 load. This is true even though the Remington shells had a quarter ounce less shot and larger pellets.

Once I had a super tight pattern, I noticed that it was way off center. I had to get a set of Truglo TG960 adjustable peep sights that clamp onto the rib.



I think Nitro is just one of the brand names they use, probably doesn't mean anything.
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Old January 24, 2010, 12:15 AM   #7
bcarver
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#5 heavy shot

I like #5 heavy shot.
6 lead is good to 30 yards.
5 lead is good to 40 yards.
4 lead is good to 50 yards.
Heavy shot kills a little further. Almost like it is one size larger.

google "turkey loads craig endicot"
he wrotes a good article.
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Old January 24, 2010, 01:06 AM   #8
LaserSpot
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Quote:
I like #5 heavy shot.
Yeah, but it's over three bucks a shell! Also, the tube he's looking at doesn't work with hevi-shot.

I found that article, some good info: http://www.wildlifedepartment.com/turkey_loads.htm

Contradicts what he found, but I was able to get good 50 yards patterns on a turkey spine target without the exotic stuff.
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Old January 24, 2010, 04:05 AM   #9
bamaranger
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depends

I would recommend a 3" shell cause the payload is way bigger, which means denser patterns, usually. There are some 3" guns that like 2.75 shells better, I hear, so again, shoot some patterns and see.

Nitro could mean several things I guess. There is (was?) a Nitro shotshell company that made "designer" turkey loads, I was given a few, but know nothing else.

Nitro Mag was a Remington Trademark and shot shell line, which I think is still produced. They were lead/buffered and might be different now.

I have not made the jump to tung/space metal shells. The cost seems prohibitive, and I am having no trouble killing birds w/ lead shot inside 45 yds, hopefully half that. I do not want to have to buy a new tube either.

I ran into a closeout at Wally World this summer and likely now have a lifetime supply of Win, 1-3/4 oz ,3", #5's, lead.
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Old January 24, 2010, 09:55 AM   #10
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I've have to disagree with bcarvers assesment of shot sizes at various ranges. While the #4 shot may hit harder at longer ranges, there are far fewer pellets in a #4 shell than a #6. Making a complete miss much more likely at the longer ranges. You've got to hit 'em before you can kill 'em.

Turkeys are shot in the neck and head and your pattern density is more important than shot size. Not saying #4's are a bad choice. Just make sure they put enough pellets in the kill zone at the range you are shooting. If they do, then if the extra energy makes you happy use them. If your patterns are too thin with #4's, try 5's and 6's until you get enough pellets in the pattern to do the job.
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