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Old December 6, 2005, 08:57 PM   #51
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Weegs

lmao. Thats funny because its true

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Old December 7, 2005, 05:53 AM   #52
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Yup


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Old December 15, 2005, 11:58 AM   #53
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kotex pads
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Old December 17, 2005, 12:19 AM   #54
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Gsw

The best advice for folks not specifically trained in trauma care has been posted.
Direct pressure.
For a sucking chest wound, covering with an airtight, impermeable membrane such as plastic or cellophane, etc. won't hurt, although it takes some skill to do it well enough to prevent a tension pneumothorax.
Direct pressure.
Forget putting any crap "inside" the wound - it won't do much to slow severe bleeding but will almost guarantee a contaminated wound. Sugar, cauterization, etc. will just make things worse. Tourniquets on extremities may be useful but can be extremely dangerous if medical or surgical help is not available in short order.
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Old December 18, 2005, 09:23 PM   #55
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issues around Stopping bleeding in real situations---

Obviously you call 911 first, IF you're in a situation where that's relevant (e.g. NOT 50 miles into the wilderness with no phone).
O/w, the two big issues are these: are you dealing with capillary leakage/venous bleeding or arterial bleeding?
In both situations, unless you're a WELL trained doctor, nurse or medic, your best bet is to apply pressure and if available, apply Quik-Clot, a volcanic ash media that I have seen stop all kinds of bleeding, even from fairly large arterioles (available from www.z-medica.com, and no I don't own stock in the company and have no connection there ). If there is an arterial bleed, then the problem is finding and isolating the bleeder. If large, it will need to have compression until trauma level care can be found, and you will need to focus on preventing shock (keep the patient warm, and if possible hydrate them to counterbalance fluid loss). If you have the skill and equipment, then suturing is the final solution if you're in a situation where medical help is far away. Hopefully the two ends of the arterial vessel can be re-anastomosed, and this requires suturing from the posterial wall forward. O/w the limb or organ served by that vessel is history.
Hope that helps.
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Old December 19, 2005, 05:04 AM   #56
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Would kotex pads not be highly aborbent - taking body fluids away from where they need to be - inside you.

Keep it simple and keep the fluid loss minimised to avoid shock
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Old December 19, 2005, 05:25 AM   #57
Weeg
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WarDoc
Obviously you call 911 first, IF you're in a situation where that's relevant (e.g. NOT 50 miles into the wilderness with no phone).
O/w, the two big issues are these: are you dealing with capillary leakage/venous bleeding or arterial bleeding?
In both situations, unless you're a WELL trained doctor, nurse or medic, your best bet is to apply pressure and if available, apply Quik-Clot, a volcanic ash media that I have seen stop all kinds of bleeding, even from fairly large arterioles (available from www.z-medica.com, and no I don't own stock in the company and have no connection there ). If there is an arterial bleed, then the problem is finding and isolating the bleeder. If large, it will need to have compression until trauma level care can be found, and you will need to focus on preventing shock (keep the patient warm, and if possible hydrate them to counterbalance fluid loss). If you have the skill and equipment, then suturing is the final solution if you're in a situation where medical help is far away. Hopefully the two ends of the arterial vessel can be re-anastomosed, and this requires suturing from the posterial wall forward. O/w the limb or organ served by that vessel is history.
Hope that helps.
Hey WarDoc...I beat the ups and downs of quickclot to death for many in here...


Good Luck


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Old December 20, 2005, 09:31 PM   #58
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the absolute best treatment: don't get shot in the first place
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Old December 22, 2005, 12:38 AM   #59
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I remember getting the wave tops of the new doctrine, tactical trauma care, from my battalion surgeon. He It was basically tourniquet any extremity (he quoted an Israeli Study that it took about 6 hours for the adverse effects of a tourniquet to occur), any hit to the torso got an "Izzy" bandage and or a Asherman chest seal. The was some discussion about Quick clot any where you couldn't tourniquet. He said the doctrine also pushes that everyone carry an IV set/bag and almost everyone if not everyone know how to start an IV.
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Old December 22, 2005, 12:47 AM   #60
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My wife worked in Navy medicine for twenty years, retiring as a HMC after several duty tours as an IDC. I was a paramedic and search and rescue medic for several years. I think the recent emphasis on combat trauma from the standpoint of starting an IV and pushing fluid replacement is an excellent idea. I had not, however, heard of tourniquets finding new favor on the battlefield. Very interesting.
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Old December 22, 2005, 07:15 AM   #61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Millcreek
I had not, however, heard of tourniquets finding new favor on the battlefield. Very interesting.



Yup...


Google "Tactical Combat Casualty Care"


Back in the late 90's, In fact, Doc Butler (Navy) was one of the early proponents when it was "Tactical Combat Casualty Care for Special Operations"...



.
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Old December 25, 2005, 12:12 PM   #62
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I have a question about injury in general. Say you are shot in the kidney but you manage to stop all external bleeding but your kidney still has a hole in it. Do you have a chance of living without any surgery or medical care? What about a hole in the intestines, liver, and lung?
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Old December 25, 2005, 01:14 PM   #63
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You NEED Surgical evaluation.

Most likely, if a vessel isn't severed, maybe not quick, but there's Peritonitis, which can cause septic shock...

.
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Old December 25, 2005, 05:36 PM   #64
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speaking from a personal experience

Well, I dealt with a shotgun wound once. I used a clean white shirt--literally just out of the dryer--applying pressure to the wound. There was no exit wounds and it was in the leg--a squirting wound. Frankly if it were made by a weapon shooting bullets instead of BBs and had made a large exit wound I don't know what I could have done--would probably have tried to pack the wound while waiting for paramedics.
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Old December 1, 2009, 03:51 PM   #65
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Wondering if flower was a good choise?

well my dog got shot yesterday cuz my neighbor thought he was a deer and I put flower on it and it seemed to work
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Old December 1, 2009, 03:53 PM   #66
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Welcome to the forum! In the future, please refrain from replying to 4 year old threads...
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Old December 1, 2009, 04:35 PM   #67
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Quikclot

For all of those curious about Quikclot, here's a video that they showed us in medic school:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9xvIbKBJn4 As has been said before, it's a tool. And one of the last tools you would actually use.

There's no substitute for hands on training. If you don't feel that you need the training, but still want to learn more, get good book with up-to-date information. Common treatments change over time. The latest resource the Army put out for its medics is this: http://www.amazon.com/68W-Advanced-F...9703098&sr=8-1

These are just for informational purposes, follow my advice (or any other advice on this thread) at your own risk.

Quick disclaimer on the video: It's pretty graphic. If you have a week stomach and can't stand the sight of blood, a) don't watch it and b) stick to paper targets (they bleed less).

Last edited by SoupieXX75; December 1, 2009 at 04:41 PM.
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Old December 1, 2009, 04:40 PM   #68
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Quote:
well my dog got shot yesterday cuz my neighbor thought he was a deer and I put flower on it and it seemed to work
and what kind of dog do you have? Either you need a much smaller dog or your neighbor needs new glasses.
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Old December 1, 2009, 04:43 PM   #69
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wow... Didn't realize this thread was so old. I hope I didn't fan the flames...
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Old December 1, 2009, 04:44 PM   #70
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Closed -- if anyone's interested in this topic, please start a fresh thread. A lot has changed in four years!

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