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Old October 2, 2009, 06:03 AM   #26
Double Naught Spy
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Quote:
I am 74 next month you know LOL.

An other point, in not one of these instances were the good guy got shots away, did the BGs stay around, bad guys turned and ex filtrated, every one, bang, turned and ran.

Just think of the shooting range, no ear muffs, wow! now think of the muzzle blast, and that air disturbance, pointed at you!! The smell of cordite had to compete with a strong smell like a public toilet in the woods, like right now!
Yes, these are interesting stories, but why are you posting them here in a thread discussing a shooting by a tagger in a Mexico City subway station? I am sure you have a point(s) relevant to the shooting in the subway, only you failed to state what is. What is the connection you are trying to convey?

And yeah, robbers generally don't stick around, whether they are being shot at or not. Their goal isn't usually to take over and keep geographical property.
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Old October 2, 2009, 08:41 AM   #27
MLeake
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DNS, you seem to be deliberately failing to comprehend...

... that the video is not only about a guy taking multiple hits before succumbing, but also of that same guy, unarmed, trying to defend against an armed man.

Therefore, Brit's post about an unarmed man successfully defending against three armed men is most definitely relevant.

Resistance to being shot should begin before one has actually been shot. Having some training at doing this can take the odds of success from extremely unlikely all the way up to mediocre.

"Physical resistance to the effects of gunshot wounds" seems to be the only interpretation you want to see placed on the thread. Others of us don't agree.
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Old October 2, 2009, 11:08 AM   #28
LafeHubert
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human resistance to being shot

I'm no expert, but I think that human resistance to being shot can vary because of circumstances. So, I might as well tell you my circumstances. This will probably be my last, and only, telling, of what happened to me in the service. I was too young for World War 2, but I volunteered when President Truman called for men in the Korean Conflict. My family had always been one of the two branches of the Naval Service, and when I enlisted it was for the United States Marine Corps. I was assigned to the US Marines 1st Division. When I was shot the first time I was hit along the left ribcage with what was assumed to be a 7.62x54R as we were approached the Chosin Reservoir in Korea. Darn it hurt, but it didn't bleed too bad; a battle dressing and rotation to a medi took care of me, then I was back with my brothers. Then again I was hit in the right thigh with what was either a SMG or pistol round as Lewis "Chesty" Puller had us slog out of the Chinese death trap there. I remember what General Puller said about our situation; "We've been looking for the enemy for some time now. We've finally found him. We're surrounded. That simplifies things." I remember three colors from that fight; the white of the snow, the universal O.D. Green, and the rust brown of frozen blood. I don't know how I got out, except that one day we were facing east and the Pacific Ocean, and the Navy had ships to retrieve us. I never thought I would be warm again. I remember the face of the first sailor who met me; he had brown hair and green eyes, and a warm gray blanket. Then I knew what it meant to be half of the US Naval Service. Most people think the Marine Corps is separate from the Navy; but it just ain't so. I was USMC, tall and proud, but I found out quickly what the Marines were like without US Naval air and ground support. It had been US Naval Close Air Support, and our casualties, that had kept us alive from the Frozen Chosin to the coast, and then US Naval close gun support that allowed us to get anywhere close to the coast. I can remember hearing the sound of Chinese artillery booming east, and the titanic roaring blasts of US Navy Ohio Class 16" battleship guns blasting west. The first US vessel I saw was a USCG cutter (I don't know her number) that was running fast along the coast, firing her 3" deck gun as fast as her crew could cycle the action. I remember my eyes filling with tears as I watched this little boat as she ran her route, trying to relieve the pressure on the ground troops. God Bless Her, and the Men who crewed her.

I don't need to say it too much but;

USMC it's a tradition
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Old October 2, 2009, 11:54 AM   #29
Yankee Traveler
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As previously pointed out...

In the Mexico shooting the construction worker went for the gun and got nothing, In the LA store, the owner went for the wrist and got the gun.

In Mexico, the civilian was armed with courage. In LA, the owner was armed with tactics and training....I draw the connection.
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Old October 4, 2009, 07:25 PM   #30
Way Tall Whitey
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Previously I had posted a link to a video that shows why I insisted that my wife and daughter both know how to use every firearm in the house, but it was apparently deleted. I sent an inquiry asking why, but have not yet received a response. So, not wanting to risk another deletion, I recommend going to a certain video sharing site and typing in "Punk shows you why gun nights are important"

This is why we carry......
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Old October 4, 2009, 09:07 PM   #31
vox rationis
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Quote:
I'm no expert, but I think that human resistance to being shot can vary because of circumstances. So, I might as well tell you my circumstances. This will probably be my last, and only, telling, of what happened to me in the service. I was too young for World War 2, but I volunteered when President Truman called for men in the Korean Conflict. My family had always been one of the two branches of the Naval Service, and when I enlisted it was for the United States Marine Corps. I was assigned to the US Marines 1st Division. When I was shot the first time I was hit along the left ribcage with what was assumed to be a 7.62x54R as we were approached the Chosin Reservoir in Korea. Darn it hurt, but it didn't bleed too bad; a battle dressing and rotation to a medi took care of me, then I was back with my brothers. Then again I was hit in the right thigh with what was either a SMG or pistol round as Lewis "Chesty" Puller had us slog out of the Chinese death trap there. I remember what General Puller said about our situation; "We've been looking for the enemy for some time now. We've finally found him. We're surrounded. That simplifies things." I remember three colors from that fight; the white of the snow, the universal O.D. Green, and the rust brown of frozen blood. I don't know how I got out, except that one day we were facing east and the Pacific Ocean, and the Navy had ships to retrieve us. I never thought I would be warm again. I remember the face of the first sailor who met me; he had brown hair and green eyes, and a warm gray blanket. Then I knew what it meant to be half of the US Naval Service. Most people think the Marine Corps is separate from the Navy; but it just ain't so. I was USMC, tall and proud, but I found out quickly what the Marines were like without US Naval air and ground support. It had been US Naval Close Air Support, and our casualties, that had kept us alive from the Frozen Chosin to the coast, and then US Naval close gun support that allowed us to get anywhere close to the coast. I can remember hearing the sound of Chinese artillery booming east, and the titanic roaring blasts of US Navy Ohio Class 16" battleship guns blasting west. The first US vessel I saw was a USCG cutter (I don't know her number) that was running fast along the coast, firing her 3" deck gun as fast as her crew could cycle the action. I remember my eyes filling with tears as I watched this little boat as she ran her route, trying to relieve the pressure on the ground troops. God Bless Her, and the Men who crewed her.

I don't need to say it too much but;

USMC it's a tradition
very touching story, thanks for sharing it

thank you for your service
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Old October 5, 2009, 02:51 PM   #32
MikeGoob
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Amazing experience LafeHubert, thank you for your service.
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