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Old June 6, 2009, 06:33 AM   #1
CaptainCrossman
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stainless 1860 Army rules

my stainless 1860 Army showed up- all I can say is WOW. Stainless is the only way to fly with an open top. All the internal lock parts and hammer are stainless as well, along with wedge & arbor. It's an Italian replica, by what I can tell an ASM- and man is it STRONG. It sounds like a Ruger Old Army when it's cocked- rock solid- a "real gun".

For once I'm actually impressed with an Italian replica c/b pistol. Most of them glisten and shine, but their metallurgy strength has gone south for the duration. This one is built to last several lifetimes.

this is the strongest Colt open top I've ever laid my hands on or seen, the stainless used in it is a very low iron content, and very high chromium and nickel content- because the barrel, cylinder, and frame do not stick to a magnet- unlike the Ruger Old Army stainless guns, which do stick to a magnet. So I did some research on it, this 1860 appears to be "austenitic stainless steel" type:



http://www.azom.com/Details.asp?ArticleID=1140

Austenitic Grades

All austenitic grades have very low magnetic permeabilities and hence show almost no response to a magnet when in the annealed condition; the situation is, however, far less clear when these steels have been cold worked by wire drawing, rolling or even centreless grinding, shot blasting or heavy polishing. After substantial cold working Grade 304 may exhibit quite strong response to a magnet, whereas Grades 310 and 316 will in most instances still be almost totally non-responsive.

The change in magnetic response is due to atomic lattice straining and formation of martensite. In general, the higher the nickel to chromium ratio the more stable is the austenitic structure and the less magnetic response that will be induced by cold work. Magnetic response can therefore be used as a method for sorting grades of stainless steel, but considerable caution needs to be exercised.



http://www.physlink.com/Education/AskExperts/ae546.cfm

As for whether they are magnetic, the answer is that it depends. There are several families of stainless steels with different physical properties. A basic stainless steel has a 'ferritic' structure and is magnetic. These are formed from the addition of chromium and can be hardened through the addition of carbon (making them 'martensitic') and are often used in cutlery. However, the most common stainless steels are 'austenitic' - these have a higher chromium content and nickel is also added. It is the nickel which modifies the physical structure of the steel and makes it non-magnetic.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stainle...tainless_steel

Types of stainless steel

There are different types of stainless steels: when nickel is added, for instance, the austenite structure of iron is stabilized. This crystal structure makes such steels non-magnetic and less brittle at low temperatures. For greater hardness and strength, carbon is added. When subjected to adequate heat treatment, these steels are used as razor blades, cutlery, tools, etc.

Significant quantities of manganese have been used in many stainless steel compositions. Manganese preserves an austenitic structure in the steel as does nickel, but at a lower cost.

Stainless steels are also classified by their crystalline structure:

* Austenitic, or 300 series, stainless steels comprise over 70% of total stainless steel production. They contain a maximum of 0.15% carbon, a minimum of 16% chromium and sufficient nickel and/or manganese to retain an austenitic structure at all temperatures from the cryogenic region to the melting point of the alloy. A typical composition of 18% chromium and 10% nickel, commonly known as 18/10 stainless, is often used in flatware. Similarly, 18/0 and 18/8 are also available. Superaustenitic stainless steels, such as alloy AL-6XN and 254SMO, exhibit great resistance to chloride pitting and crevice corrosion due to high molybdenum content (>6%) and nitrogen additions, and the higher nickel content ensures better resistance to stress-corrosion cracking versus the 300 series. The higher alloy content of superaustenitic steels makes them more expensive. Other steels can offer similar performance at lower cost and are preferred in certain applications.[citation needed]

Last edited by CaptainCrossman; June 6, 2009 at 06:39 AM.
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Old June 6, 2009, 08:30 AM   #2
drdirk
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I have been looking for a stainless 1860! Where did you get it? And of course, where are the pictures????
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Old June 6, 2009, 10:41 AM   #3
slabsides45
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Tease! Where are the pics??!
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Old June 6, 2009, 11:17 AM   #4
madcratebuilder
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Didn't happen with out pic's!

Colt 2nd and 3rd gen offered some models in stainless, spendy revolvers. Uberti offers current production and there are a few manufacturers that have made them in the past.
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Old June 6, 2009, 11:46 AM   #5
CaptainCrossman
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I paid $310 shipped for this one- lucked out. It is an ASM, found the ASM logo on it today, barely readable but there. I missed a CVA stainless 1860 about a month ago for $275 + shipping, and was determined to find another.

Pulled the barrel, tightened all the nipples, they were backing out for some reason. Even the wedge is stainless.
Attached Images
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File Type: jpg DSC04086.jpg (247.6 KB, 58 views)

Last edited by CaptainCrossman; June 6, 2009 at 11:56 AM.
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Old June 6, 2009, 11:54 AM   #6
CaptainCrossman
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here 3 more pics with a dark background-this one is a keeper, barring a crazy mad money offer
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Old June 6, 2009, 03:37 PM   #7
arcticap
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That's one nice piece of kit!

Quote:
All the internal lock parts and hammer are stainless as well, along with wedge & arbor.
That's interesting since AFAIK, the licensed 2nd generation SS Colt repro.'s did not have stainless internals.
Could this mean that ASM made the best Colt repro. in the world?

Last edited by arcticap; June 6, 2009 at 03:50 PM.
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Old June 7, 2009, 04:23 AM   #8
MacGille
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Cap, Thats one nice looking Revolver. Don't shoot it in bright sunlight though. Might hurt yer eyes.
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Old June 7, 2009, 05:46 AM   #9
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Very nice cap.

Here I go, droolin' again
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Old June 7, 2009, 07:07 AM   #10
CaptainCrossman
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Quote:
hat's interesting since AFAIK, the licensed 2nd generation SS Colt repro.'s did not have stainless internals.
Could this mean that ASM made the best Colt repro. in the world?

good point- the only way to tell would be get both guns, take them apart, and compare them- I'm sure the Colt guns are finished to a higher degree of perfection. This guy has some tiny finishing flaws here and there.

re: stainless lock parts- I bought a pile of Remington parts that were basically a bunch of junk, turns out the hand and bolt were stainless when they arrived- checked just how much those cost- they are PRICEY, around $25-$30 each for those tiny stainless parts. The cost of the parts was $50 shipped price, so I guess I got a deal there.
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Old June 7, 2009, 09:49 AM   #11
AdmiralB
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Quote:
stainless used in it is a very low iron content


I guess, if you call over 70% "very low".

Dude. You're not a metallurgist. Quit trying to play one on the interwebs.
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