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Old January 15, 2009, 05:48 PM   #51
Socrates
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Think jogging weight, but, with one prong bent back, one forward, and the center knife a spring loaded, steel bar.

http://www.udap.com/video/Bear%20Attack.wmv
After watching this, it doesn't look like the bear is really attacking, just a tame bear, having a little jog, and swat the trainer.

http://www.udap.com/video/bearsprayed.wmv

This is a pretty good sized black bear...

http://www.udap.com/video/marksbearattackvideo.wmv

Point in posting these is I agree, that pepper spray has to be handy, and, you have to be able to get to it, nearly instantly, same as being attacked by a bear, having a gun, etc.
https://store.udap.com/merchant.mvc?...tegory_Code=PS

Last edited by Socrates; January 15, 2009 at 07:46 PM.
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Old January 15, 2009, 06:10 PM   #52
RonC
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In some of our local parks, coyotes were 'baiting' off-leash dogs. A single coyote would approach and attempt to draw the dog to follow it. If the dog did follow, there was a pack of coyotes around it in an instant - and the dog became lunch.

It's rare for a coyote to attack when the dog is near humans, but they are Wiley coyotes.

Also, many outdoor cats in the neighborhood have vanished, probably due to coyotes.

Ron

Last edited by RonC; January 15, 2009 at 11:51 PM.
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Old January 15, 2009, 07:39 PM   #53
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I wonder if folks know just how fast an aggressive dog can act. If the dog has already decided to attack you, or your pet, I doubt you will have much time to think about it, or react.

Yeah I have to agree. I posted my "dog test" (post #16) but I guess I can't blame folks for not understanding because I wouldn't have believed the results myself until I tried to move faster than my dog.
Yep. I'm very well aware. This is one of several reasons I advocate the working strain Pit Bulldog, American Bulldog, Airedale, Catahoula, Ridgeback breeds... ASSUMING one knows what the Hades these breeds are/for and what they (the owner) is doing.

To me a dog is a pet and a member of the family. However, he is also the FIRST LINE OF DEFENSE and is expendable under certain circumstances. Combating wildlife is one in which I demand that the dog IS PERFECTLY CAPABLE OF INTERCEPTING HARD! If one's breed of choice is not then stay out of the woods and nowadays out of the suburbs.
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Old January 15, 2009, 08:35 PM   #54
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Why do people forget Great Pyrenees
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Pyrenees
Sheep dogs who defend against bears...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6EdNHI5inDM
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Old January 15, 2009, 10:35 PM   #55
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Have defended my shetland sheepdog on two separate occasions while CCW.

Fended off two boxers (local pets). One was agressive the other was not. The agressive one made repeated lunges at my dog with snapping jaws as it passed while I kept myself between him and the shelty. He was after my dog and I was able to discourage him with kicks until a neighbor who knew the dogs got them under control.

A neighborhood Akita (120+ lbs) and it's sidekick (little dog) charged us from the woodline. I again put myself between it and my dog. I was suprised at my own reaction on this one...by how calm I was. I controlled my dog with leash and voice commands, drew my .45, clicked the thumb safety and took aim. We calmly stood our ground. The ball was in the Akita's court. It assessed the situation, relaxed it's agressive posture, decided to circle us and then went home. Good dog, smart dog.

I would defend my animal with leathal force (or I better not go home). Size (of the dog) does matter. I would likely be charged with discharging a firearm within 500' of an occupied dwelling.

Hope this never happens.

I have no use for sprays or sticks.
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Old January 16, 2009, 10:17 PM   #56
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I'd like to make a point although someone may have already covered it....

Cops will not hesitate to shoot a threatening dog and are never questioned nor reprimanded. This IMO sets a precedent. Civilly speaking - Dogs are property. No one will cut me any sympathy if they do harm to my dog (maybe after court they'd pay for vet bills at best), and turnabout is fair play - their dog is simple property just the same. Of course my dog is much more than property to me. My dog is small and she is not about to take on any large threats, therefore if I have to terminate said threat to save my girl, its an easy decision - dog or coyote will face the same end. This is extreme of course and I love all animals so I would do anything I could to avoid a bad situation but we are talking extremes.
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Old January 17, 2009, 01:34 AM   #57
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It's a coyote for goodness sake! Just kill the damned thing.
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Old January 17, 2009, 01:57 AM   #58
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Similar question

I have whippets (minature greyhounds, - http://stripduke.web-log.nl/photos/u...6/twinkle2.jpg ------ and NO that's not me or my dog.) And they are the last thing from a dog with ANY fighting capability... It'll maul a rabbit like there is no tomorrow but anything else and it's doomed for sure. Here in spokane we have a HUGE problem with Pitbulls and the people that train them to fight and cant take care of the puppies.... At any given day you can pull up on "division street" and there will be someone selling them out of the back of a van or bronco.... I personally think they are stupid and worthless animals that should be shot on site unless they have owners that teach and control them (I.E. Leashes at all times, and high fences) But here in Spokanistan, they more or less run free. My mom was attacked once on the way to work (on foot) and so was my girlfriend (walking to school). So you Pit owners will have to excuse my negative bias. But i constantly see them roaming free and now i don't even walk my dogs because the way i see it, i'm going to run into one, it's a "when" issue not an "if" issue. And my dogs don't stand a chance, now i could let them go and i know they could outrun one. But i don't know if they're smart enough to run, and even if they were, there's always traffic and each of them cost about a grand so.... Also, Spokane is very "tree huggish" and i'm fairly certain that if i was forced to defend against a free roaming Pit, The media would portray it as a slaying of an innocent puppy by a crazy gun toting nut looking to fire off a few rounds... So now i just avoid it all at the cost of my own dogs health and happiness... I wish it weren't this way but people are NOT ok with guns in washington... My shirt came up and accidentally exposed my gun at walmart once when i tripped and everyone lost their minds!!! i was actually detained because someone told a clerk i was robbing the F*****G place.... so that's why i won't shoot a stray. I've been told that i've just been unlucky and that washington is really quite acceptant to firearms but i havent seen it...
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Old January 17, 2009, 10:58 AM   #59
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An attack by coyotes on a woman walking her dog was reported in the Denver papers yesterday.
She saw what looked like two dogs coming over to play with her yellow lab in a Broomfield (a bedroom suburb north of Denver) park. One of them attacked her and bit her arm. Her 75 lb lab attacked one of the coyotes and drove them both off. Fortunately, the teeth didn't go through her thick coat and she suffered only bruises.
These urban/suburban/ex-urban coyotes are losing or have lost their fear of humans, making them much more dangerous.
My wife won't carry a gun but does carry high potency pepper spray while walking our Greyhound and Golden Retriever mix. Greyhounds were bred in some places to chase down coyotes and similar pests, but the current racing Greyhound has likely lost that inclination or capability.
I carry a Ruger SP101 stoked with 38 spl +p or a 1911 Commander when walking the dogs or hiking in the mountains with my family. Regardless of legal consequences, I will have no problem with shooting any animal that attacks. That is not to sound macho, but just a natural reaction to protect my family.
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Old January 17, 2009, 03:41 PM   #60
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Last week I was out walking my aussie shepherd, she is all about play and doesnt have a mean bone in her body. Two people on horseback were out with there Weimaraners (LOOSE) no leash at all, damn hounds were just running loose.
Now I have no problem with this, but damnit your dog better be trained and stay next to you and not just running loose and not listening to anything the owner tells it.

Here comes this dog running right at me, the owners yell one time to there dog to come back and then just flat out take off on there horses. The dog approaches fast and comes right at my dog, mouth open, I kicked that SOB as hard as I could in the chest (Danner FT Lewis boots). I then reached for my Strider DB and was ready to jam it in its head if it made another try at attacking my dog, lucky for that dog, it left after I had kicked it, Now when out for a short hike with my dog, I carry my Lamey 10 inch Bowie

Living in Cali and carrying a gun is a big no no, so I am limited to knives and walking sticks.

I will not hesitate if givin the chance, to kill any damn animal that is attacking my dog, my dog is part of my family (I like dogs more then most people lol)
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Old January 20, 2009, 09:02 PM   #61
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Coyote attacks in the Denver metro area are a hot topic as of late as there have been a number of attacks including dogs being snatched right off their leash! I've heard several interviews on local talk radio and the response from DOW / LEO has been you cannot legally shoot the coyote inside the city limits. As I understand it, this is consistent for Denver and the surrounding suburbs, love to hear if anyone knows otherwise.

We routinely walk our dogs at a local dog park in Littleton, CO and have heard of several recent Coyote sightings from other folks at the park, no attacks here .. yet. This park happens to be within a State Park and portions are also "owned" by the Army Corp of Engineers. The bottom line from what I've been told .. don't even think about pulling your CCW or even so much as an Airsoft pistol (not that I think it would even slow a Coyote down if it was looking to eat). I'm wondering if anyone knows the local laws on Pepper Spray? Less than ideal of course ... but better than looking for a rock in a hurry.

As much as I love my dogs, I worry more when my 3 year old is with me ....
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Old February 10, 2009, 11:01 AM   #62
andrewskaggs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chui
Yep. I'm very well aware. This is one of several reasons I advocate the working strain Pit Bulldog, American Bulldog, Airedale, Catahoula, Ridgeback breeds... ASSUMING one knows what the Hades these breeds are/for and what they (the owner) is doing.

To me a dog is a pet and a member of the family. However, he is also the FIRST LINE OF DEFENSE and is expendable under certain circumstances. Combating wildlife is one in which I demand that the dog IS PERFECTLY CAPABLE OF INTERCEPTING HARD! If one's breed of choice is not then stay out of the woods and nowadays out of the suburbs.
The wife and I were out walking our 2 6-month old German Shepherd/Catahoula mix puppies yesterday evening--a male and a female at 60 lbs and 50 lbs respectively (yes...yes...they're big, but they're still puppies). We were going along our normal route when I glanced over into a neighbor's backyard to see a large adult dog (some breed of bulldog...I'm not sure which) making a beeline to our position in what appeared to be an aggressive manner. Our dogs saw him about the same time we did and started going completely ape barking and growling at the charging dog. I quickly switched the leash to my off hand and swept back my cover garment with my other while yelling "Back!" in as loud and commanding a voice as I could. Just as my hand was coming to rest on the butt of my handgun in preparation for the draw, the dog pulled up and stopped his charge. The owner of the dog came running around the house and I dropped my cover garment back into place. He eventually got control of the dog and we went about our business.

Things I learned:

1. Dogs are ridiculously fast. Having spotted the dog from about 50 feet, I would barely have had time to draw and fire if my reaction time had been perfect.
2. My dogs can read the body language of another dog much better and quicker than I can. After seeing the dog charging, they immediately became hostile. They do not act this way around dogs that are not acting aggressively. I'll trust them more from now on.

Things I'll do differently next time:

1. Keep the leash in my off hand. Having to move the leash cost me time I don't have when there's a dog charging.
2. Do not hesitate to draw and take aim at a charging animal. You simply do not have time to second guess yourself against an animal that is as fast as dogs are.
3. If my dogs' posture and my verbal commands aren't enough to stop or significantly slow down the charging animal, it gets a faceful of JHP if he gets closer than 15 ft.
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Old February 10, 2009, 11:06 AM   #63
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While not a gun toter, I am usually armed with a working style knife.
But if I am walking any one of the hunting dogs (especially the bulldogs for catch duty), they can pretty much fend for them selves. I just gotta stand off to the side so as to avoid bites on myself...
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Old February 10, 2009, 11:55 AM   #64
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sounds like a good reason to carry a suppressed Ruger MkII
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Old February 13, 2009, 02:13 AM   #65
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This past summer I was walking my dogs, a husky and miniature grey hound at a park. Another lady was walking her big rottweiler. She stopped to talk to some people and dropped the rotts leash. It came towards my dogs and I, while it wasn't acting aggressive my husky is. I figured if it got to close and started growling it was going to take some lead in the head. I figure I'm being responsible and keeping my animals on a leash minding my own business and other people can't do the same they shouldn't be allowed to have pets. Same goes for strays and wild animals. They leave me alone, I'll leave them alone.
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Old February 13, 2009, 05:04 PM   #66
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Greyhounds were bred in some places to chase down coyotes and similar pests, but the current racing Greyhound has likely lost that inclination or capability.
Not hardly. I've done Greyhound rescue and adoption for over twenty years, and the 'yote hunters were always trying to get dogs from me. Around here (rural Nebraska) coyotes avoid anything resembling a Greyhound like the plague. I never have coyote problems around my property.

Friends who race Greyhounds and are active in adoption told me about their experience living near Los Angeles. Coyotes were getting into people's yards and killing small pets. One got into their yard. After their 90 pound retired male Greyhound got through with it, they were picking up pieces of Mr. Yote with the pooper scooper.
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Old February 14, 2009, 03:15 AM   #67
Socrates
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Wonder what a Great Pyr would do to a coyote???

Thinking of moving, and, the area I want to move to has a Great Pyr rescue real close, and, I think I'd have plenty of room for him...

If you had mountain lions around, what kind of dog would you want to have in the yard???
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Old February 14, 2009, 03:21 PM   #68
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If you had mountain lions around, what kind of dog would you want to have in the yard???
a wolf hound, or mastiff.
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Old February 15, 2009, 01:37 AM   #69
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It wouldn't take much at all to motivate me to shoot a mountain lion. I came across one just a few months back while walking in a forested ravine at night in an urban area. He was within 30 feet or so of me and if he'd turned in my direction instead of walking away I would have shot him for sure. As it was he and I both walked briskly away from each other.

Just a funny coyote story: We haver a couple coyotes in our neighborhood that we hear almost every night and see on an almost daily basis. Only two of them and they are often alone. One of them is a female and about 2 1/1 years old, the same age as one of my Belgian Malinois (I've got two Mals). When the female coyote and my female Malinois were both about a year old I was walking in a parking lot near out street when the coyote came up to within 20 feet of my pup. She started hopping sideways towards my dog in a playful way. I let my Mal off her leash and I've never seen two dogs run that fast in my life. My Mal chased her for about 10 minutes straight in a circle around the nearbye streets, catching the coyote twice.

When I called my pup back to me the coyote followed her and and layed down in the parking lot less than a car-length from where me and my dog stood. A lady who'd been driving by stopped and told me she thought it was two coyotes chasing each other until I called them back to me. lol The coyote's become pretty domesticated and a guy who lives on my street leaves food and a water bowl out for it.
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Old February 16, 2009, 10:32 PM   #70
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I personally don't hold the "stopping power" of a handgun in high regard. That's even more true if an animal hasn't watched enough TV to know it's supposed to fall down when shot.

I would not expect an attacking canine to be terribly impressed with a round of anything between 9mm and .45 ACP. In the frenzy of a dog fight, I think a meaningful hit would be extremely difficult. If the dog is charging, fear and surprise will also make hits difficult.

Unfortunately, I don't know of many alternatives. I'm left with "try pepper spray first", "carry a walking stick", or "expect to empty the magazine".
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Old February 16, 2009, 11:06 PM   #71
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Had one happen to me. Went to a friends house, worken on a car and drinken a few beers. Yes I'm redneck. Left my weapon home. There were six of us there and none of us noticed the pit bull till it attacked my friends dog, tied to a tree in his front yard. Three of us jumped on the pit with two by fours and pipes. With blows that would of killed any man, we only managed to **** the pit off. We were able to take refuge in a truck bed till the leo got there. When he arrived the pit turned it's aggression on him. Wrong move, four rounds later dead pit. After the drama I asked the leo if I would of been justified shooting the dog. His reply "hell yeah!"
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Old February 17, 2009, 07:05 AM   #72
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Wait until you all get some Timber Wolves. Now you have a federally protected animal with a track record of looking at your dog like the Sunday Buffet. They have eaten a couple around here. There was a guy with a bird dog that was being attacked by a Timber while he was HUNTING. Most hunters here just sort of chortled and shook their head over that one.
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Old February 17, 2009, 01:43 PM   #73
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in that case it would be sss.
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