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Old January 14, 2009, 06:49 PM   #1
jeo556
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How Hot is TOO Hot?????

I recently purchased a Browning Buckmark with a factory full length guide rail. As the gun was bought used I'd very much like to disassemble and clean thoroughly. My problem is apparently Browning used red loctite on the rail screws as well as the barrel screw, all of which need to be loosened for disassembly. I know that I need a little assistance from heat and was hoping that you guys could answer some questions for me. If I use a heat gun, is there any possibility of damaging the finish with the temps that heat guns produce?(From what I read approximately 1000 degrees.) I've also read that a soldering iron is a good idea, is there any way that could damage the finish? BTW, the gun has a factory matte black finish. Any and all help would be very appreciated. I know that I could just take her to a gunsmith but at this point its a personal battle.
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Old January 14, 2009, 08:11 PM   #2
Dfariswheel
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The soldering iron is the preferred option.
A heat gun will heat TOO much area.

I don't think Browning used Loctite on the barrel bolt, but who knows what a previous owner did.

Loctite breaks down at around 350 degrees, and that's not that hot. Don't over-heat.
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Old January 14, 2009, 08:14 PM   #3
mega twin
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A pencil type soldering iron applied to the screw drive portion of the screws will most of the time heat the loctite enough to break it loose. Give the screw driver a rap with a hammer to seat it in the screw head before twisting.
A heat gun tends to spread the heat out too much for my tastes,while the soldering iron will localize it just tothe threads.
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Old January 14, 2009, 08:41 PM   #4
rocket12
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the back rail screw is a beveled screw with a beveled lockwasher, if tightened to tight,the allen head screw will strip before it comes loose. use caution
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Old January 14, 2009, 09:15 PM   #5
HiBC
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As far as temps,try going to the loctite website and learning about loctite.There are some grades that happen to be red that are good to around 430 deg.
You might just try unscrewing them.Don't get too crazy,use a top quality new allen wrench if it is an allen screw.A tee-handle is good.Generally,if the wrench is springing a lot,time for plan"B".Sldering iron is not the worst plan.
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Old January 14, 2009, 11:15 PM   #6
Ricklin
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Allen screws and locktite

Since allen wrenches are cheap put a 'sacrafical' allen wrench in the fastener and heat the wrench with a propane torch to transfer the heat in to the screw. Then set that wrench aside and quickly loosen it with another wrench of the same size.
Works like a charm. I have even used this trick on painted items without damaging the paint.
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Old January 15, 2009, 12:09 AM   #7
F. Guffey
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Joe556, I have an arc-torch, that is hot, in the old days the movie projector used carbon sticks for light, if the film stopped the film burned. Not everyone but a few used the carbon sticks for localized heat, worked great when annealing a small area for drilling holes in a receiver that is too hard for drills. A handle was made by removing the insulator from a spark plug, the power source was supplied by a 12 volt battery with leads, current flow was controlled by the resistance in the carbon, for heating small areas, the carbon stick would be sharpened, rather than helpful, this information is more about being nice to know.

Off/on, no switch,just make contact.

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Old January 15, 2009, 04:15 AM   #8
HiBC
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F Guffey,
May I respectfully ask,is there any danger when the current passes fom the screw to the hole,the tapped threads,etc,it might arc a bit and weld the screw in?
I know such things can happen grounding through a bearing.
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Old January 15, 2009, 10:14 AM   #9
jeo556
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Thanks for the replies gentlemen. I will give her another try and report back with results.

P.S. Go Steelers!!
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Old January 15, 2009, 01:37 PM   #10
Double J
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I hope the Buckmark doesn't have a plastic sight base like mine "had".
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Old January 15, 2009, 02:14 PM   #11
jeo556
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Double J, that's what I'm thinking.... This particular model has the target sights and from what I can tell there is no plastic. However, I'm known to have horrible luck and a small plastic insert somewhere on the sights is almost guaranteed. At this point I may just swallow my pride and take her to the place I bought it. It just hurts to go into a shop and ask "Can you guys get these screws loose for me?" Sounds like "Honey, can you open this jar for me?" I hate that thought of it!
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Old January 15, 2009, 04:35 PM   #12
jeo556
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Guys,
Thanks for the advice but I succumb to the idea of ruining my gun and took it to the place I purchased it. The gunsmith used a "impact driver" to release the screw in question.
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