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Old August 9, 2008, 10:19 AM   #1
kristop64089
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What about Beretta SAA?

Ya never here much tals about them. They are really good looking guns.
How do they compare to, Ruger?

Do people not buy them because it's Blasphemous?(Itallian cowboys).

Just looking for user comments/reviews.
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Old August 9, 2008, 10:59 AM   #2
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No, lots of people buy Ubertis as fine, affordable Colt copies, so they're not shunning the Beretta for being Italian either (and Beretta owns Uberti now anyway). Unlike other Italian SAA copies including the rest of the Uberti line up, the Beretta has a Ruger-like transfer bar that permits shooting a full 6 rounds. Some people feel that the additional small parts associated with the lockwork/ transfer bar just mean more to go wrong - and makes it less reliable in the end and would just as soon live with the older hammer mounted firing pin and no bar--or otherwise get the tried 'n true Ruger anyway. The Beretta does permit a nearly identical-to-SAA look and feel--even more than the Ruger New Vaquero--with more modern mechanicals (including a coil mainspring I believe) and ability to chamber a round under the hammer like the Ruger (though some still prefer to load just five anyway as an extra safety measure).
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Old August 9, 2008, 11:38 AM   #3
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They're good guns and a lot of people buy them. I personally don't like the transfer bar.
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Old August 9, 2008, 12:08 PM   #4
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I would expect anything with the Beretta name to be a good gun but I wouldn't want a traditional SAA with a transfer bar. A solution to a non-existent problem.
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Old August 9, 2008, 12:57 PM   #5
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I like, though am not limited to, short-barreled single-actions with Bird's Head grips. Since Ruger never made the gun I wanted in .357, I bought a Beretta Stampede Marshall. It is a very good gun. Since then, I have purchased a Cimarron Thunderer with dual .45 cylinders. It is also a very good gun. If I had it to do over, I would probably purchase a Cimarron (Uberti) .357 and just load five simply to do away with the transfer-bar. Beretta's transfer bar works just fine if you want to load six. It does have one potential weakness compared to Ruger in that the Beretta is loaded from the half-cock position like other SAA, so when you load six it is necessary to carefully lower the hammer over a live round to take advantage of the transfer bar. With the Ruger, simply opening the loading gate and loading six is all that is necessary without ever drawing the hammer back. Were I to choose between the Beretta in .357 and the Cimarron in .45, I would pick the Cimarron, but the Beretta is a fine revolver. Fit and finish is impeccable and it's very pretty.
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Old August 9, 2008, 01:12 PM   #6
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Are the Beretta/Uberti frames strong enough to handle "hot loads". I still haven't picked up my Vaquero, In fact once I found out that thier case colring was artificial, I have had second thoughts. I am looking for a utilitarian gun, To be honest, I don't know how much it will get shot, but I do want to get as strong a gun as possible, and the Uberti/Berettas look good.
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Old August 9, 2008, 01:25 PM   #7
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I would expect anything with the Beretta name to be a good gun but I wouldn't want a traditional SAA with a transfer bar. A solution to a non-existent problem.
I disagree, the transfer bar is a good solution to a real problem.
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Old August 9, 2008, 01:41 PM   #8
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I'm not sure, but I think the color-case finish on all the mentioned guns is a cosmetic finish. Which ones are more durable I don't know. As far as strength, I know even the New Vaquero is plenty strong for anything you might fire in .357 but is not recommended for the .45 Colt "Ruger Only" loads reserved for the Blackhawk and the "original" larger Vaquero. I believe the Beretta and Uberti guns are only recommended for standard .45 Colt loads but will handle any factory .357 load, so far as I can tell (there are no warnings otherwise). Since Uberti offers its .45 Colt revolvers with an extra .45 acp cylinder and .45 acp is higher pressure than the .45 Colt, there must be some margin of safety beyond the 14,000 psi of .45 Colt but don't hold me to that, I don't know how far that is. The Ruger does have all coil springs and a reputation for durability more than the true SAA clones. Personally (and this is heresy) for a working gun, I prefer the more modern action of the Ruger and find cocking the gun easier and faster than the multiple clicks of the SAA. I like the SAA for what it is, but the Ruger design, IMO, is more modern and better overall (Ducking...). I like 'em both, for different reasons.
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Old August 9, 2008, 02:19 PM   #9
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I disagree, the transfer bar is a good solution to a real problem.
I'd say it comes down to personal preference and experience.
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Old August 9, 2008, 02:27 PM   #10
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The Ubertis are a case hardened finish, not just case colored. Not sure about Beretta. The ruger is just case colored (cosmetic).
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Old August 9, 2008, 02:31 PM   #11
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I'd say it comes down to personal preference and experience.
I have guns with the transfer bar, and some without. I like both about equally, but I think it is not correct to say there is not a problem in guns without the transfer bar.

You might say the problem is with operator knowledge and experience, but its still a problem. If it wasn't a problem, there would have been not have been millions of dollars spent on lawsuits and design changes.
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Old August 9, 2008, 04:08 PM   #12
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Let me start by stating that I own over a dozen of each, New Model Rugers and traditional single actions, factory and custom, and love them both for different reasons. All else being equal, I prefer a traditional action over the "modern" version.

Safety is between the ears and nowhere else. The transfer bar is a safety device that only defers responsibility from where it lies to where it doesn't. I'm totally opposed to devices designed to save the idiots from themselves. I am not an idiot and greatly won't be treated as such. Not to mention they are also smoother and crisper with less trigger creep. A New Model Ruger can be made very slick but nothing, nothing compares to a tuned traditional half cock action. The spring issue has been blown completely out of proportion by folks who believe Ruger's marketing.

If it was as much of a problem as you imply, there wouldn't be as many traditional guns as there are. Right now, there are more traditional single actions on the market than those with transfer bars.


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I disagree, the transfer bar is a good solution to a real problem.
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Old August 9, 2008, 04:32 PM   #13
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I agree that education is the most important determinant of safety, but whether you like it or not, most people are idiots and will do something stupid if given half a chance. I don't think you necessarily deserve the death penalty just for being stupid.

However, the transfer bar solves problems besides just safety for idiots. The transfer bar allows you to safely increase your ammo capacity by about 20%, even if we totally drop the safety perspective.
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Old August 9, 2008, 05:24 PM   #14
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Now I am really starting to doubt my Ruger purchase.
I don't have the extra Money for a MR, or Freedom Arms.
But I definately don't like the "shortcut" Ruger has taken with the Case coloring. I really like the Case colored guns, but the strength the Ruger provides.

I'm pretty set on a Case Colred gun, because I don't have one. I like SS guns, but have plenty.

where to go from here?
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Old August 9, 2008, 05:30 PM   #15
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The transfer bar allows you to safely increase your ammo capacity by about 20%, even if we totally drop the safety perspective.
That's still a matter of opinion and experience. I've carried six in a SA for almost 40 years with the hammer down between chambers in conditions you probably never dreamed of. Haven't put a hole in myself yet. If you're safe you don't need a transfer bar. A transfer bar is about like training wheels on a bicycle.
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Old August 9, 2008, 06:09 PM   #16
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I've carried six in a SA for almost 40 years with the hammer down between chambers in conditions you probably never dreamed of.
You're right.

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Haven't put a hole in myself yet.
Keep on trying and sooner or later you will get it right.
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Old August 9, 2008, 07:29 PM   #17
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Not likely. I don't get in those conditions anymore. I'm careful and I know what I'm doing. I don't use cut down fast draw holsters and the hammer is tied down. Think about it. When is an AD most likely to happen? Snagging the hammer on something or putting it back in the holster. If the hammer is tied down it's not going anywhere if it snags. If you snag it putting it back in the holster you need a better holster.
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Old August 9, 2008, 07:43 PM   #18
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back to the case color/hardened discussion. i shoot two stampedes. one of them has the rear sight notch dark all the way across it. on the other it has a marble effect> light and dark across the rear sight notch. ****** me off to say the least. look yours over before taking it home. fwiw bobn
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Old August 9, 2008, 08:45 PM   #19
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I have a Stampede Marshall with well over 500 rounds through it (no +P rounds) and no problems. It's case coloring is chemically applied and I've read other threads about it peeling off if solvents are used to clean the frame.
Regarding the 45 ACP cylinders for Uberti's; where would one go to find one? I checked the Uberti website but didn't see anything. Does anyone have one and is it model specific? I'd like to get one for my Cattleman. Any point in the right direction is much appreciated.
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Old August 9, 2008, 09:23 PM   #20
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01Apache - I don't know what to tell you. My convertible is a Uberti from Cimarron. http://www.cimarron-firearms.com/ They offer convertibles in several configurations.

I believe EMF and maybe others also offer Uberti-made convertibles. I don't know if they will retrofit a cylinder even for their own guns let alone one from someone else. I believe that US Firearms will retrofit a convertible cylinder to one of their guns but, of course, they're not Ubertis.

I am hoping that one day Ruger will offer a run of convertibles in their New Vaquero series.
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Old August 9, 2008, 09:46 PM   #21
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Thanks Laz
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Old August 9, 2008, 09:53 PM   #22
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I read a few years ago that the Ubertis are case hardened not case colored. This was from a company executive, and I believe a member of the Beretta family. The Uberti website also states they are case hardened.

Believe what you will, I am simply passing on information given to me, and verified by the website.
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Old August 9, 2008, 11:14 PM   #23
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That's interesting, Unregistered. I'm looking forward to how well both the Cimarron and Beretta finishes hold up. They're both good looking right now.
I have a pair of consecutive serial number New Vaqueros. It'll be interesting to see how the applied finish holds up on them. I have heard it is improved over the case-coloring on the (original) Vaqueros. Time will tell.
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Old August 9, 2008, 11:25 PM   #24
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From what I understand, Uberti's are color case hardened, not just colored. They just don't have the dramatic colors found in the Turnbull shop. The Beretta's are definitely just colored chemically. As is the Ruger Vaquero.
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Old August 10, 2008, 01:42 AM   #25
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I'm not that much into SA wheelguns yet, so correct me if I'm wrong here. The other place that the transfer bar helps is with drop safety. If the gun is dropped, there's much less chance of a discharge.

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I've carried six in a SA for almost 40 years with the hammer down between chambers in conditions you probably never dreamed of. Haven't put a hole in myself yet. If you're safe you don't need a transfer bar.
Just because you managed to avoid a hazard for a long time does not mean the hazard should not be minimized by improved design. Ask the widows of the Apollo-1 Astronauts. NASA used a 100% oxygen pressure test for several years, including in the Gemini program with no problems. Only when something "broke" (shorted) did they re-evaluate their designs. It only cost 3 very good men their lives to learn the lesson.
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