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Old May 6, 2008, 11:14 PM   #1
garwoos
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.45 acp reloads not fully loading

Just got a new Taurus 1911. Using 230 gr lead reloads, and some of the rounds are not fully feeding into the barrel. Manufacturer suggests using 230 gr fmj, but I am trying to conserve money (so I can shoot more) by using lead. Any suggestions what I should do to get these to feed properly. Using Lee dies. Powder and primer are not a factor. This occurs during loading.
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Old May 6, 2008, 11:38 PM   #2
copdills
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I had the same problem and got a taper crimp die and it solved my problem if I am reading this right
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Old May 6, 2008, 11:45 PM   #3
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Assuming your brass is resized enough, there are at least two other things that can cause or contribute to this.

Insufficient case belling prior to seating bullet. A little lead or lube gets smeared around the case mouth and the rounds don't want to seat in the chamber.

Insufficient taper crimp. I use a Hornady TC die myself but don't be afraid to bring the case mouth right into the side of a lead bullet. Just make sure you don't bury it there or both accuracy and headspace may suffer.

Hope this helps.

PS- Check your OAL, too. If your individual barrel has a shallow leade (into the rifling) you may have to seat a tad deeper to accommodate it. Just make sure you don't seat the bullets deeper than specified for a given powder charge. Reduce your charge when seating deeper than specified by the manuals.
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Old May 7, 2008, 12:07 AM   #4
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The bullets may be oversized or cocked into the case when loaded. You could resize all the bullets, or try a Lee Factory Crimp Die. It will resize the case AFTER you seat a round, and then crimp the case without pushing the bullet any farther in. Makes for a "better" crimp with less shaving lead. It also ensures that the case and bullet are the same diameter as the case is 'supposed' to be. I use the Factory Crimp Die for my auto calibers, and it has made my guns more reliable.
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Old May 7, 2008, 12:24 AM   #5
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I've loaded this caliber for 30 years and found that I had to taper crimp. However also check your sizing die and make certain it is sizing the entire case. You might have to look closely, this will keep from seating the last 1/32 or so of an inch.
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Old May 7, 2008, 01:34 AM   #6
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The two "S's"--Sizing and Seating.

If your brass isn't sized correctly, you're working uphill already. If your bullets are properly sized (and some cast bullets aren't), the hill is getting steeper.

And finally, if you're not seating and then crimping correctly (ie, deep enough--check your COAL), the hill becomes vertical.

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Old May 7, 2008, 01:45 AM   #7
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Taper crimp to .469-.471" ? If so, you might benefit from using a Lee FCD.
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Old May 7, 2008, 07:11 AM   #8
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What is your cartridge OAL? I've found 1.250" works well with my 230gr LRN loads.
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Old May 7, 2008, 09:37 AM   #9
garwoos
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I have been reloading with my dad and for some reason we have been afraid to crimp. Sounds kind of silly now. I will give the crimp a try and I have a feeling that should do the trick. I just don't see going to the fmj just for practice. Thanks for the response everyone.
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Old May 7, 2008, 10:36 AM   #10
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MOST dies built in a caliber that's typical for a semi-auto pistol will include a taper crimp feature on the bullet seating die. MOST dies built in a caliber that's typically a rimmed revolver round will include a roll crimping feature on the bullet seating die.

Whether or not you are crimping depends on how far your bullet seating die is screwed in to your press.

If you are properly loading lead bullets in a .45, you should be flaring or belling the case mouth to accept the bullet. If you are properly loading lead bullets in a .45, you should also be taper crimping the rounds if you want them to properly feed and chamber in most any pistol.

A Lee FCD may help you to produce better feeding rounds, but there's many thousands of us out there who have done fine without one. This could be because of die adjustment, bullet size & choice, the particulars of the pistol that eats the ammo or technique at the press.
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Old May 7, 2008, 10:37 AM   #11
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Quote:
I have been reloading with my dad and for some reason we have been afraid to crimp.
You ought to be much more afraid of not crimping. Bullet setback is a good way to raise chamber pressure exponentially and damage a fine pistol or your shooting hand.
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Old May 7, 2008, 01:43 PM   #12
drail
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Hold a loaded round up to a good light and look down the side of the case. If any of the flaring is still present you will be able to see it. You'll have to crimp enough to remove all of the flare plus just a little more. Start with a light crimp and increase a little at a time. If you take the barrel out of the gun and use it as a gauge your rounds should drop in all the way and fall out easily. I also use Lee dies. I've used the standard seat and crimp die and also the taper crimp die and had no problems. On an ACP round you will have to crimp to get reliable feeding. Another thing to consider is overall length. Don't be afraid to experiment with the length as most every pistol is different. 1.250 is a good starting point.
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Old May 7, 2008, 01:49 PM   #13
garwoos
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Thank you everyone. I will be testing some of the newly reloaded "crimped" rounds this week end or maybe sooner.
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Old May 7, 2008, 02:54 PM   #14
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Quote:
You ought to be much more afraid of not crimping. Bullet setback is a good way to raise chamber pressure exponentially and damage a fine pistol or your shooting hand.
Taper crimping has absolutely nothing to do with preventing setback!
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Old May 7, 2008, 05:26 PM   #15
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Oal of 1.250 works for most guns, and too much crimp can also cause problems. You can actually loosen the neck tension, and or, bulge the brass if ya over do it.
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Old May 7, 2008, 06:23 PM   #16
Sevens
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I've heard you say that before AlleyKat, but it I don't see it that way at my bench. Yes, I realize that case mouth tension is what prevents setback, but it's pretty obvious that I can take a piece of brass with a nicely flared case mouth and push a bullet well in to it, and I cannot with one that isn't flared, and I can't with one that is taper crimped.

If we can agree that flaring a case mouth helps to open up the brass so the bullet can freely seat without shaving lead--

and we can agree that taper crimping un-does the flaring of the case mouth--

Why can't we agree that taper crimping aids in the defense of bullet setback?

In any case, he said he & his Dad were afraid of crimping on the whole. Roll crimping, taper crimping and crimping rifle cases will all help to reduce the possibility of bullet setback. Crimping your loaded reloads is not something you should be afraid to do.
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Old May 7, 2008, 07:17 PM   #17
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A Lee Carbide crimp die will solve the problems. It posts sizes the case and will smooth out any bulges in the case that prevent feeding. I use one for all auto loading cals. I load.
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Old May 7, 2008, 09:18 PM   #18
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Buy a case gauge and drop you reloads into the go no go gauge.
Dillon and many other suppliers have them 15 buck max.
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Old May 7, 2008, 09:30 PM   #19
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"...give the crimp a try..." It must be a taper crimp. Once you get that sorted out, take out the barrel and use the chamber for a guage. Drop the loaded cartridge in the chamber to make sure it fits. Needs to be flush with the back of the chamber.
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Old May 8, 2008, 09:26 AM   #20
Alleykat
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Quote:
Why can't we agree that taper crimping aids in the defense of bullet setback?
Nah, we can't agree on that, and I'm not the only person cognizant of the fact that taper crimping has little-to-no effect on setback. Roll-crimping into a cannelure, however, is a different story.
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Old May 8, 2008, 09:51 AM   #21
Sevens
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Good enough.
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Old May 8, 2008, 02:03 PM   #22
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I agree

Quote:
Nah, we can't agree on that, and I'm not the only person cognizant of the fact that taper crimping has little-to-no effect on setback. Roll-crimping into a cannelure, however, is a different story.

I made a snap cap out of a 45acp case and a rainier 230gr bullet, and after repeated dryfires, the bullet would start setting back. After crimping the hell out of it it still set back. Finally I filled the case with paper, seated a new bullet, finally no more set back
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Old May 8, 2008, 06:03 PM   #23
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The Evil Lee Facory Crimp Die Worked For Me

I pick up range brass. Everything! The Lee Factory Crimp die solved the feeding problem I was having on my Wilson 45acp. I put it on the last station on my Dillon 650 and have basically left it alone. I loaded about 10-12k rounds over the last year with 0 feeding prblems.

My guess is that if I perhaps had another pistol or only used brass shot through my pistol I wouldn't have any feeding problems without the Lee FCD. My gun is very, very, very accurate and reliable with the ammo I produce, so I'm happy.
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