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Old January 19, 2008, 03:28 PM   #1
Perldog007
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Daily Practice?

Any advocates out there of daily presentation practice from whatever rig is being worn before stepping out of the house?

I am curious because I have taken a bunch of ribbing for this habit. When doing security work my drill was to triple check and clear my primary and do ten presentations at least before loading and securing it.

BUGs' usually got three presnetations or so.

For CCW off duty I would usually do at least two presentations from concealment before loading up and heading out. Usually more.

Am I just weird or does anybody else do this?
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Old January 19, 2008, 03:43 PM   #2
Mannlicher
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I practice some aspect of self defense and gun handling every day.
It might be presentation, reloading, malfunction clearing or the like.
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Old January 19, 2008, 05:37 PM   #3
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Duh! That's kind of a no-brainer. If you want to achieve a superior level of skill, you should practice daily. Having said that though, it is important that it is good practice. To reach the level that I did, I would practice everyday. 100 draws and dry fires, 500 rounds live fire, 1/2 hour mental training and visualize 100 perfect shots before bed.

Anyone who doesn't advocate daily training has no idea what it takes to be a winner whether it is on the range or on the street.

The saving grace is that once you reach a certain level, the less you have to practice to maintain it. It's reaching that level that is hard.
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Old January 19, 2008, 10:23 PM   #4
Perldog007
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I have to admit part of the reason I found it crucial to my peace of mind to do some presentations before heading to work is that I have seen some officers look pretty stupid trying to get their weapons out. To me that did not seem to be the kind of presence that would inspire cooperation.

Not to mention a good way to get hurt while looking foolish. The more compelling reason was my safety and that of those I was hired to protect.

Even now when I put on a pistol to go work in my woodlot, I do some presentations before loading up. When I get my chl in my new state I will resume my old habits. Just wondering if anyone else here thinks it is important to practice daily with whatever rig they are using.
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Old January 28, 2008, 08:13 PM   #5
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I think you should practice daily or as much as you can. Its a simple continuum: the more you practice the better you're going to be. Perhaps you get into an encounter with a BG who has a gun and intends to use it. At least you know you'll be able to pull and shoot faster, all things equal.
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Old January 28, 2008, 10:20 PM   #6
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Daily practice can be a good thing. It can also burn you out if you overdo it. Also, if you forget your carry gun is loaded and do some quick-draw, well AD/NDs happen that way.

That is why I have a aluminum red barrel (Brownells sells) in my competition Glock 17 so I can do all kinds of practice in the garage without fear of goofing up.

And yes, it does help you quite a bit in gun handling skills and somewhat in marksmanship.
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Old January 29, 2008, 11:12 AM   #7
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I admit that I do 3 -5 CCW draws with whatever I'm wearing almost immediately before leaving the house... then another once I get seated in my truck (I live in the country with no neighbors to see me 'brandish')

Quote:
Daily practice can be a good thing. It can also burn you out if you overdo it. Also, if you forget your carry gun is loaded and do some quick-draw, well AD/NDs happen that way.
If you don't draw with your finger on the trigger, AD/ND's can't happen.
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Old January 29, 2008, 04:06 PM   #8
Whirlwind06
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I do some practice draws. Usually at night though. I think it would freak out my son if I did them in the morning. (I get him ready for school)
I also keep my finder off the trigger.
A couple nights a week I unload my pistol and put in snap caps and practice drawing and firing and changing mags.
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Old January 29, 2008, 05:51 PM   #9
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I used to do target practice around three times a week. As its getting increasingly dark where I live, I find it difficult as Im normally back not much before 5pm.
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Old January 31, 2008, 04:22 PM   #10
tegemu
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This is a great use for an Airsoft pistol just like your carry gun.
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Old January 31, 2008, 05:12 PM   #11
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When I was competing I would go out in the garage and shoot my airpistol (Webley Hurricane) daily. It was really unforgiving with follow-through, and helped me a lot.
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Old February 1, 2008, 09:59 AM   #12
mamboreta
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A friend of mine bought himself 50 cheap nylon jackets (really cheap, maybe $5/7 each) and practiced a lot with his hamerless .357 revolver, shooting .38´s from inside of the right pocket once, and again, and again, and again. He learned to handle fire, recoil, etc.

One night, all that practice and ruined jackets proved to be as useful as it gets. And one more jacket (aprox. $500 this time) was ruined in favor of his life.

If you are going to carry, practice is the only way to go.
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Old February 1, 2008, 09:07 PM   #13
Perldog007
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Quote:
A friend of mine bought himself 50 cheap nylon jackets (really cheap, maybe $5/7 each) and practiced a lot with his hamerless .357 revolver, shooting .38´s from inside of the right pocket once, and again, and again, and again. He learned to handle fire, recoil, etc.
now that's practice!

If I did that at the range instant loss of membership, better start looking for an "undisclosed location".

And a rechargeable fire extinguisher, man that's hardcore. Good for him.
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Old February 10, 2008, 08:53 AM   #14
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“Dry Fire, Dry Practice, Dry Firing”

“Dry Fire, Dry Practice, Dry Firing”

By: Tom Perroni

The motivation from this article came from a discussion I had with several firearms instructors. We were discussing the fact that some of the veteran officers who had recently come to the range to qualify were having problems with low scores. The same officers fresh out of training had much higher scores.

So the question was asked to the veteran and rookies: How often do you practice? The answer was not very often… The follow up question was how come? The answer was that going to the range was expensive and the officer simply did not have the funds available to practice on his or her own time. I was shocked since most of the training at my Academy is for Law Enforcement and Private Security. These folks are paid to deal with Deadly Force situations. And the Handgun is the most important tool of their trade. With their lives and the lives of the public at stake they should be at the very least proficient with this tool.

So my follow up question was have you ever heard of or practiced Dry Firing or Dry Practice? I was again surprised by the puzzled looks on the faces of these officers. One officer finally said, “What is Dry Firing?”

Dry Fire – This when the trigger is pulled without live ammunition in the firearm.
This method of training can be done just about anywhere and costs absolutely nothing. In this Instructors opinion it is vital to anyone who uses or carries a handgun. Essentially you are doing everything you would do at the range except your handgun is empty. (NO AMMO) The most important single fundamental skill in shooting - Trigger Control – is one which can best be improved off the range in dry practice. As I have stated in past articles there are (7) fundamentals of Handgun shooting which all can be practiced with Dry Fire.

Tips to get you Started

1. Safety: This is the most import facet of Dry Fire practice! Make sure the Handgun is UNLOADED! Make sure that all live ammo is out of the room or area you will be training in. Also make sure you have a suitable backstop. The use of snap caps is up to the shooter. Some people feel they protect the firing pin. However you can fire most modern firearms without causing any damage to the fringing pin or the action of the handgun. Consult your owner’s manual to be sure.

2. Targets: This is left up to the individual. You may use anything you like B-27 or an FBI –Q or life-size human target or a 3X5 index card or a spot on the wall; you will however need a reference point to aim at. This is important.

3. What should be practiced? I suggest practicing everything you do at the range - all seven fundamentals of marksmanship:

1. Stance
2. Grip
3. Sight Alignment
4. Sight Picture
5. Trigger Control / Press
6. Breathing
7. Follow Through

Also the draw which has (5) points, as well as reloading and safe high speed gun handling. There are several types of Reloads that can also be practiced.

A. 5 Points to the Draw

1. The firing hand secures a firing grip on the handgun while the support hand touches flat to the abdomen
2. The handgun is lifted straight up until it just clears the top of the holster. The trigger finger is straight on the Handgun. The support hand is still flat against the abdomen. The hand and the forearm are in line with the handgun.
3. The firing side elbow drops and the muzzle points directly toward the target. The support hand is still flat against the abdomen. The trigger finger is straight.
4. The handgun starts toward the target and the support hand establishes the proper grip. The muzzle never covers any part of the body. The trigger finger is still straight. The hands come together fingers over fingers and thumb over thumb (Thumbs forward)
5. The handgun is at eye level and the finger is on the trigger.

Then we place the handgun back in the holster in the exact reverse order while maintaining eye contact with the target. “Do not look at the holster.”


B. Speed Reloads: These drills help develop muscle memory. Press the magazine release to drop the magazine while at the same time with the non shooting hand grab the fresh magazine from its pouch, indexed with your finger, and insert into the magazine well. If this is done correctly the magazines will pass each other in mid air.

C. Tap-Rack-Asses this drill clears malfunctions and or Jams and effectively “resets” the firearm.

Tap- means to smack the bottom of the magazine firmly enough to lock it into place or dislodge any bind in the magazine.

Rack- is a cycling of the slide to eject any hammered or dead casing or to re-chamber a new cartridge following a malfunction.

Assess- means being prepared to commence or resume fire as required by assessing the situation.

(These maneuvers most be able to be performed flawlessly and subconsciously any time the shooter experiences a failure to fire or malfunction)


3. How often should I practice “Dry Fire”?

Practicing the above drills for 10-15 minutes each day will greatly benefit the shooter. I have seen marked improvement in students who practiced these drills for just 2 days. However please remember Handgun Skills are like buying a car: if you do not make your payments the car will be repossessed. If you do not practice the new handgun skills you paid for they will also be repossessed.

In conclusion remember smooth is fast, and speed is economy in motion; Accuracy always takes precedence over speed. As John Skaggs from the Chapman Academy says “You should own two guns . One you wear out dry-firing and the other you shoot with.”

I urge you to spend the minimal time required to develop your “Dry Fire” skills with this cost-free method that will improve your life saving skills.

Stay Safe & Shoot Straight!


Tom Perroni is the owner, President and Chief Instructor of Perroni's Tactical Training Academy. Pulling on a five-year law enforcement operational background, Tom has spent the last fifteen years delivering training to government, military, law enforcement and private security companies. Tom is a NRA Certified Firearms Instructor and NRA Range Safety Office, Maryland State Police Handgun Instructor, Virginia DCJS Handgun, Shotgun and Advanced Handgun Instructor /Trainer for the PSS section. Tom is also a Contract Instructor for Blackwater Training Center. Tom is also the Training Director for Golden SEAL Enterprises .He is a member in Good standing with IALEFI & ILEETA. Tom appreciates feedback and can be reached through the Contact page on his company website at http://www.perronitactical.com or http://www.goldensealenterprises.com
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Old February 10, 2008, 01:42 PM   #15
pax
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If you are going to regularly practice dry fire (good article above!), please follow the four rules. That includes selecting a target (the best place for a bullet to land in a given situation) with a safe backstop (one which absolutely would stop a bullet from the most powerful loading your firearm is capable of firing).

It is not enough to follow just one of the four basic safety rules ("keep your finger ...") while ignoring the others. The rules interlock, and are designed to prevent tragedy when a human being makes a (predictable, normal, understandable, human) mistake. Throwing away three of the rules just because you intend to follow one of the others is a recipe for disaster.

More about dry fire: www.corneredcat.com/Practice/dryfire.aspx

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Old February 10, 2008, 08:24 PM   #16
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Thanks for the links

Pax: (Kathy)

You have a great web-site! and you also have a great article on dry fire!

Thanks for the info!

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Old February 11, 2008, 09:29 AM   #17
Edward429451
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Yeah, the wife may think you're weird. So what, she'll get used to it. It's not like riding a bike so just follow Nike's advice and Just do it. I like doing dry draws when in different states of mind than a usual routine. Breaks it up a little and teaches you about yourself. Keep the unloaded gun and four rules as a consistent routine though.
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Old February 11, 2008, 11:27 AM   #18
skeeter1
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No, I don't

"Anyone who doesn't advocate daily training has no idea what it takes to be a winner whether it is on the range or on the street.

The saving grace is that once you reach a certain level, the less you have to practice to maintain it. It's reaching that level that is hard."


I've been practicing for 50 years, and don't see the need for daily practice. I hit the range ~once/month. The rest of the time I practice with a pellet gun in my basement. I have a lot of confidence with any firearm I'm handling.
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Old February 12, 2008, 11:50 PM   #19
Lurper
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Quote:
"Anyone who doesn't advocate daily training has no idea what it takes to be a winner whether it is on the range or on the street.

The saving grace is that once you reach a certain level, the less you have to practice to maintain it. It's reaching that level that is hard."

I've been practicing for 50 years, and don't see the need for daily practice. I hit the range ~once/month. The rest of the time I practice with a pellet gun in my basement. I have a lot of confidence with any firearm I'm handling.
Confidence and winning are two different things. If your purpose is to be fairly competent with a firearm that's one thing. But to be a winner is another thing.
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