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Old December 8, 2007, 05:31 PM   #1
mniesen89
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how many times is too many times?

How do I know when brass needs to be thrown away after to many reloads....I've shot through the same brass 4 times and it still seems fine.
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Old December 8, 2007, 06:28 PM   #2
Chief-7700
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All depends on what your reloading! I load .45 ACP until it splits or I lose it. Have
some headstamped WCC 43 and could not tell you how many times they have been reloaded.
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Old December 8, 2007, 06:53 PM   #3
Sogman6
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There really isn't a set number of times you can use brass. If you are loading high pressure rifle loads for instance 4 or 5 might be max. However keeping loads at a normal to light load there is no real limit. Look for loose primer pockets, splits in the mouths of case. Also full length resizing will take life from your brass. That is as opposed to neck sizing only.
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Old December 8, 2007, 07:22 PM   #4
Slamfire
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You need to be more specific as to what case you are talking about.

Straight walled pistol ammunition can be fired darn near forever. Its lifetime is determined by when the case mouth cracks. I have nickel 38 Spl brass that has sized so many times that you have to look hard to find traces of nickel.

The 5 times and toss idea comes from 30 caliber service rifle shooting. Both the Garand and M1a are hard on brass. The actions on these rifles open up when there is residual pressure in the barrel. This pressure helps to keep the action moving, but the cartridge gets stretched during extraction. These rifles are well known for stretching the case so much that cartridges will often have case head separations between 5 and 10 reloads.

The number of times you can reload a case in a Garand or M1a will vary between rifles, and will vary depending how much you set the shoulder back.

Brass in bolt guns can be fired an amazing number of times. I remember a friend who desperately wanted 7mm-08 brass with small primers. That type of case had been discontinued, but he got about 200 cases from a long range shooting bud of ours. The cases already had been fired 20 plus times, and I am certain my friend took it at least ten more times by the end of the season. Rife brass fired in bolt guns is really limited by case neck splits, body splits, and how tight the primer pocket holds the primer.
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Old December 8, 2007, 11:28 PM   #5
mniesen89
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my question regarded rifle bras, 30-06,.270,.223 mostly....so basically when I see the primers loos or fing cracks in the case neck it should be junked? And I am shooting the larger cal through bolts and the .223 through my AR
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Old December 9, 2007, 11:19 AM   #6
Slamfire
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Quote:
my question regarded rifle bras, 30-06,.270,.223 mostly....so basically when I see the primers loos or fing cracks in the case neck it should be junked? And I am shooting the larger cal through bolts and the .223 through my AR
Basically yes. Toss cases with loose primer pockets, and with neck or body splits. You do not have to toss the whole bunch, just the offending cases.

I do recommend that you use a Wilson type headspace gage to set up your sizing dies. The instructions that come with sizing dies, on how to set up, are phooey. You have to use a gage to figure out how much you are sizing the case. Oversizing of cases will reduce case life as it will cause early case head separations. Not sizing enough, and you will have feeding issues. Use a gage and size it right. This web site is really useful for showing how to use case gages. I recommend looking at the pictures.

http://www.realguns.com/Commentary/comar46.htm

As for the AR, I think I am up to close to ten reloads on some of my .223 cases. The AR is a lot easier on brass than a Garand, it opens up later in the pressure curve, so brass lasts longer. So I should say, brass lasts longer so it must be opening later in the pressure curve. I have seen case separations almost 2/3rds of the way up on a AR fired case, so that must be where the stretching occurs.
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Old December 9, 2007, 02:04 PM   #7
Chief-7700
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Slamfire1, Hum were you thinking about rifle brass or " my question regarded rifle bras, Sorry just could not help myself
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Old December 9, 2007, 07:43 PM   #8
mniesen89
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Yeah my wife was sitting here while I posted my last comments,so I guess bras was appropriate as to brass! but thanks slamfire...informtion greatly appreciated
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