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Old November 11, 2007, 06:01 PM   #1
indigo-357
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327 Mag: 2 Qs

http://www.shootingtimes.com/ammunition/st327_110707/

Those of you with experience in similar matters:

First:

What does the timeline look like for component availability when companies field new cartridges? I'm interested in this caliber, but have no interest in paying retail for loaded ammo.

Second:

Opinions on the future success of this cartridge? Personally, I think it has everything going for it:
- Service caliber performance in velocity/SD/energy
- "Chamberable" in easily concealable revolvers
- Excellent name for marketability (magnum sells) that draws from the 357Mag appeal.

Of all the new cartridges fielded in the past few years (GAP, 480, etc.), I think this one has the potential to make the long haul.

Indigo
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Old November 11, 2007, 08:54 PM   #2
HankB
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Federal's website claims a 115 at 1300 ft/sec, which isn't shabby, but is still a bit less than the top 9mmP loads with that weight bullet.

The slug is smaller in diameter, too.

While I won't be voluntarily standing in front of one, for self defense I see no reason for it, especially since better, NON-proprietary rounds are available in the same packages.

I see it as a gimmick, like so many other propietary rounds - the GAP and 480 which were already mentioned, but the .32 H&R Mag, the 338 Federal, 204 Ruger, etc., just an attempt to garner additional sales by providing an answer to a question nobody was interested in asking . . .
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Old November 13, 2007, 02:17 PM   #3
Scorch
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Quote:
First: What does the timeline look like for component availability when companies field new cartridges?
When the 32 H&R Magnum was introduced back in the 1980s, components were available within about 3 months.
Quote:
Second: Opinions on the future success of this cartridge?
When the 32 H&R was introduced, it acquired a small but rabidly loyal following for a while. Hunters liked it for its flatter trajectory than a 38, without the muzzle blast of a 357. SD enthusiasts started talking about velocity and penetration. Lots of folks were pretty excited about it, but not enough to turn loose of their cash.

Personal opinion: 32 caliber handguns have been around for a long time, and have survived based on some folks liking them for their penetration and lack of recoil over larger bores. Detractors have poo-pooed them as popguns for their lack of bullet mass.

I used to own a Colt Army Special in 32-20, and I loved the way it shot and its flat trajectory, and it worked well on small game and bunnies. It was a fun gun to shoot.

Ultimately, if enough people buy them, the gunmakers will make guns for the cartridge, and ammomakers will make ammo and components for the cartridge. If not, ask yourself when was the last time you saw a box of 32 H&R Magnum ammo on a store shelf?
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