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Old January 16, 2007, 08:49 PM   #1
Kato_Guy
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bullet seating

ok i read most of the abc's of reloading and read almost every website I could find. I am trying to find where it says the length i need say a 223 or a 270wsm bullet to be. Does this info come with the book i get with the reloader or what.

This whole bullet seating thing has me a little confused also. People are talking about seating to the lands. Is there an overall length that people can go by and adjust from there or what??

I understand everything else except the bullet seating. At least I THINK I have a pretty good grasp on it!!

Thanks for any info!!


kyle

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Old January 16, 2007, 10:32 PM   #2
Bullet94
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Bullet seating depth is the OAL (over all length) of the cartridge (measured from the base of the case to the tip of the bullet). Some may list COAL (cartridge over all length) which is the same as OAL. Reloading data in manuals or from the powder makers or bullet makers should list OAL for their data and cartridge. The listed OAL’s are a length that will work in all SAAMI spec rifles, which should also fit in the rifles magazine. Some rifles and reloaders load to OAL’s longer than what is listed which may not fit in a mag, trying to find the best OAL for accuracy in their rifle. For new reloaders I would say to stay with the listed data, OAL's or recipes. Loading into the lands is not for every rifle and not for every bullet and not for every reloader either.

When loading close to or into the lands measurements are made using bullet comparators, which measure from the bullets ogive (the curved portion of a bullet forward of the bearing surface) not the bullet tip. Measurements made from the bullets tip will vary in the same lot of bullets (you will probably notice this when measuring OAL’s) where measurements made using a bullet comparator on the bullets ogive will be more consistent. And by the way your seating die doesn’t seat the bullets from the bullet tip but rather by the ogive (at least for rifles) more consistent.
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Last edited by Bullet94; January 16, 2007 at 11:06 PM.
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Old January 16, 2007, 11:38 PM   #3
Kato_Guy
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ok thanks that helps out a lot!

I just need to buy that thing that clamps onto my caliper to measure overall length and I should be ok. Right? This might be a stupid question but what is the diff between head spacer and overall length gauge?

once I get the hang of things If I wanted to I could adjust from there!

thanks again
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Old January 17, 2007, 12:54 AM   #4
Bullet94
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To measure OAL all you need is your calipers.
To measure from the ogive you need your calipers and a bullet comparator.
Here is a link to bullet comparators. I like the Sinclair comparator.

http://www.sinclairintl.com/cgi-bin/...TCO&type=store

Sinclair has lots of things you might read about.


HEADSPACE - The distance from the face of the closed breech of a firearm to the surface in the chamber on which the cartridge case seats.
HEADSPACE GAGE - A device used in a firearm to determine the distance between the breech face and the chamber surface on which the cartridge seats. Also called Breeching Plug.

Below is a link to SAAMI’s Glossary which might help you with the proper terms plus the definitions also sometimes explain things.

http://www.saami.org/Glossary/index.cfm

I can tell by your questions you are new to reloading. Take your time, read a lot (like you mentioned) get several reloading manuals (I believe Hornady has some good info on headspace in their manual) use the search here and ask questions. Always better to be safe. Don’t do anything you are not sure of. Lots of people here to help and you might look here too.

http://www.thehighroad.org/forumdisplay.php?f=15

I’ve been reloading for a while and I’m no expert, but there are more things involved with seating bullets past or longer than listed OAL’s than just buying a comparator. My advice to you would be to learn how to reload by the manuals and once you’ve done that then do some research on loading longer OAL’s. Don’t get ahead of yourself. .
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Old January 17, 2007, 12:44 PM   #5
mrawesome22
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Take a empty case. Cut a vertical slit in the neck, barely into the shoulder, with a hacksaw. Barely seat the bullet you want to use in this case with your hands. Chamber this round in your rifle. Eject it with your hand covering the ejection port. Take it out and measure it from base to tip with your calipers. This will give you MAX OAL (over all length) for that bullet. In other words, this bullet is touching the rifling. Now you can experiment with different seating depths. I've found that my rifle usually gives best accuracy .030" away from the rifling. But you'll just have to experiment as to what shoots the best out of your gun. This method works very well and you don't have to waste money on a Stoney Point guage.
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Old January 17, 2007, 01:56 PM   #6
Kato_Guy
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Thanks everyone yea you are correct I am new to reloading just looking at getting into and buying pieces as I go.

Yep I am reading as much as I can I paged back in the reloading history what seemed like 200 pages!! And my wife is getting a little bit upset that I am spending more time reading than spending time with her. ohh well tho if she gets mad at me its off to the reloading room and shut the door (when I get started)!!!!

Thanks again everyone!!



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Old January 17, 2007, 03:24 PM   #7
Ares45
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Short version: Stick with your reloading manuals published data. Usually the listed COL is a MINIMUM COL. The load book should preface any load data with a description of exactly what the data represents. Remember shorter COL increases pressure.

Loading into the lands can under some circumstances create dangerously high pressure spikes. Imagine plugging the end of a garden hose with your finger, ect. It's not for the beginner.

ETA:

Quote:
ok i read most of the abc's of reloading and read almost every website I could find.
The ABC's is not a reloading manual, its more of a how to guide. You do have a real honest to god load book don't you? You really cannot proceed safely without one (or more). My personal preferences: Speer #13, Lee Modern Reloading, Hornady, and Lyman #48th.
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Old January 17, 2007, 03:42 PM   #8
XD-Guy
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Kato Guy, If you decide to buy the Lee reloading book and you go with Lee dies, you'll find that the min. OAL's are listed next to the recipes and the max. OAL's are in the instructions for the die sets. Hope this helps.
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Old January 17, 2007, 03:52 PM   #9
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AMEN...If the manual does not give you the COL, or COAL, then you need a real manual. Go to the section specific to your caliber. The COL for .270 w/ a 130 is 3.280. The COL specs for 223 is 2.210 for 50-55gr. bullets, but this varries significantly by bullet type, so make sure you are consulting your manual to each weight you are loading.
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Old January 18, 2007, 01:34 AM   #10
Kato_Guy
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Like I said before I am starting buying the pieces to start reloading. The only thing is a tumbler that I got a great deal on!!! I do not have the press or anything I am waiting for the store to get in the lee kit and I believe that it has the lee modern reloading book. I will buy the kit take out the book and put the kit into storage until I am confident in what I am doing. yes I am going to get lee dies as well i am going to get the lee deluxe set. I am going to borrow my bosses speer book today and read that and I am also going to take a look at the reloading manual he has.

As for the whole loading on the lands I was reading about it and just curious what it was all about that was it!!

I may be a rookie but I know what my capabilities are. Like many of you have said before read any and every book you can get your hands on and that is what I am doing. I am trying to get as much info that I can before I even set up my press.

thanks for everyone's input sorry I sound so much like a rookie!!!!!

kyle


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Old January 18, 2007, 02:34 AM   #11
Bullet94
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Quote:
thanks for everyone's input sorry I sound so much like a rookie!!!!!
Nothing wrong with being a rookie. We all were. Sounds to me like your on the right path. And don't be afraid to ask questions. I wish there had been forums like this when I started.

Good luck and be safe.
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Old January 18, 2007, 08:06 AM   #12
qajaq59
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Rookies

Quote:
thanks for everyone's input sorry I sound so much like a rookie!!!!!
Trust me, the rest of us weren't born knowing everything about loading. We were ALL rookies at one time.
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Old January 18, 2007, 08:14 AM   #13
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We all have a touch of rookie left in us. I don't know of one man that "Knows" it all. But there are probably a couple out there that believe they do. Keep asking and I'll keep learning

WW
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Old January 18, 2007, 01:33 PM   #14
castnblast
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BTW, ALWAYS, I REPEAT...ALWAYS ASK QUESTIONS!!!. Reloading is not a macho sport. It is definitely not for the ego maniac who knows everything. I've been reloading for 20 years, and I've learned more from asking questions here, then I did in all those early years of reloading. Especially when I bought a 22-250 this past summer. I'd never worked w/ varmint rounds before, and discovered they act very different when reloaded compared w/ larger bore calibers. I learned stuff about twist rates and so forth that never mattered before in the rounds I was loading. When in doubt, ask a question...No one on this forum will curse you for doing so. The advice you recieve here, is designed to keep you reloading, and prevent you from hurting yourself. Reloading is very safe, provided you follow instructions, and seek the wisdom of others. Enjoy this habbit! You will come across things as you get started that will enlighten the rest of us as well. So share your experiences, and knowledge as you go with the rest of us. We can always learn something, and if nothing else, remind us of something we may have forgotten.
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Old January 18, 2007, 04:08 PM   #15
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Always be sure to check your manual to see if the COL (COAL OAL whatever they're calling it this month) listed is a max or a minimum. Different manuals use different data. I have one manual that lists COL max for handgun loads and min for rifle. Do not assume. Also remember that COL is variable according to your application. Seating in the lands is not something for a beginner to try. Rifle throats are being manufactured longer lately to avoid lawsuits from overpressure disasters. It may not even be possible in your rifle.
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