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Old December 30, 2006, 02:43 PM   #1
Watermain
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1" or 30 mm Scope Tubes?

Hello from England. I hope you excellent chaps in the old Colonies are in good festive spirit.

I've asked this question here in England, but really didn't get too much feedback.

I know we get what we pay for, to a great extent, BUT ........ is there REALLY that much difference between a 1" tube and the 30 mm? If so, I can't think why all the top makers don't just stick to 30 mm.

I've just ordered a Docter 3-9 x 40 (from the States where it's MUCH cheaper, even with shipping). It has a 1" tube, despite being made in Germany. The 30 mm from Docter is about twice the price. I desperately fancy it, of course, but I'd want a heck of a better scope for that price.

I want something wonderful to sit on my Sako 6.5 x 55 but the whole scope thing is closing in around me, and my wife keeps telling me to get the the computer.

We all tend to champion whatever we're used to, but I'd like some unbiased views from people who REALLY know the difference, and aren't trying to sell me something off their dusty top shelf.
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Old December 30, 2006, 03:08 PM   #2
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Goodness! I see I'm listed as a Junior Member. Let me tell you, at aged 62 that is a damned fine RESULT. John
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Old December 30, 2006, 03:08 PM   #3
Ripplingh2o
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From my experience and knowledge there isn't anything different between the 1" tube and/or the 30mm tube EXCEPT you cannot swap 1" rings for 30mm rings and vice versa because there is a measuring difference between the two and if I recall the 30 mm tube is ever so slightly larger than 1". I think the ONLY reason for the 1" tube is because the inch measure is the american standard while the metric standard 30mm is moreso European (and elsewhere). Admittedly many scopes ARE IN FACT made in Europe or elsewhere overseas with a 1" tube for the sole reason of being marketed in the United States. Hope that helps.
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Old December 30, 2006, 10:20 PM   #4
ConRich
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Watermain, There are some benefits to a 30mm tube as apposed to a 1" tube, they are: a 30mm tube allows more room for more elevation adjustment which is necessary for long range shooting. Also a 30mm tube allows more light into the scope. A good place to learn more about the pros and cons of the different scopes availlable is. www.riflescopes.com HTH

Rich
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Old December 30, 2006, 10:37 PM   #5
Jim Watson
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Light transmission with modern glasses and coatings is not enough different between 1" and 30mm to worry about unless you shoot at dawn or dusk. The wider span of adjustment in the larger tube is a big help if you shoot at long range and need to crank up the elevation. It only becomes significant beyond 600 yards in most cases.
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Old December 31, 2006, 12:56 AM   #6
Zak Smith
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Tube diameter has nothing to do with light transmission.

The main advantage of a larger tube diameter is more erector travel, which means more elevation and windage adjustment travel (ie, clicks).

The larger diameter tube will be somewhat stronger, but tube strength is rarely a scope's weak spot.
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Old December 31, 2006, 06:36 AM   #7
Watermain
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This is really good information, and not at all what my dealer has to say - but then, he'd like me to buy the expensive 30 mm version.

I NEVER shoot at long range. Most shots will be under 100 yards, in dark and grimpen low light conditions, in my own woodland. I need all the light gathering I can get. I am drawn to the 56 mm scopes but - I'm worried about parallax problems at short range with a big objective lens. Am I talking complete balderdash?

I tell you, this is not easy. I hope the 3 - 9 x 40 Docter is going to be OK. In any case, I'm looking for another scope, and it has to be right.

This forum is a God-send.
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Old January 6, 2007, 07:13 PM   #8
Watermain
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I eventually found a tremendous amount of information on this subject at the opticstalk site.

http://www.opticstalk.com/forum_post...96&KW=parallax

The result is that I'll be buying 1", unless someone presses a $1,500 30mm Swarovski into my sticky hands and asks for $600.
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Old January 12, 2007, 05:54 PM   #9
FirstFreedom
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My understanding is that the light "tube" width is far less than 25mm (1") anyway, so the tube size is utterly irrelevant, EXCEPT for the POSSIBLE extra adjustment range in the erectors mentioned by Jim W. above, if the scope maker utilized the extra 5mm to add more adjustment range.
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Old January 13, 2007, 03:04 PM   #10
Watermain
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First Freedom:

Yes, I have discovered you're right. I've stopped agonising now, and have ordered a Zeiss Conquest 4.5-14 x 44 for the Sako Hunter 6.55x55. I wanted side parallax control.

A 1" tubed 3-9 x 40 Docter (Sport) I ordered from the States has arrived, and it is superb. Beautifully built, wonderfully bright, and decidedly too good to put on the Ruger .22 LR for which it is destined. It's very interesting to see that the Docter range hasn't REALLY taken off in the States. It appears to be every bit as well made as the other top shelf German scopes, but the makers having changed their name from Carl Zeiss (Jena) to Docter, it perhaps lacks the glamour of Zeiss and S&B. It is amazing to me that they did not look at the marketing downside to the name Docter, which just sounds sort of strange to English speaking folks, when connected to riflescopes. I notice too, the Docter Riflescope colour brochure is gramatically hopeless. It is an excellent translation, but it does not read as well as something written by an English copy writer. It's a shame, because the products appear to be first class.

Anyway, for $299 I think the scope I have received is the bargain of the century, and I'm sure it will sail well past its 30 year guarantee period. I'm hoping I live long enough to see it expire: I'd be ninety-two.
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