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Old October 23, 2006, 06:02 PM   #1
kenneth owens
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neck tension

is neck tension the most critical aspect of a good benchrest load,I would think that it is. what are your thoughts??
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Old October 23, 2006, 06:49 PM   #2
stinger
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My guess would be bullets.
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Old October 23, 2006, 06:58 PM   #3
rwilson452
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Critical aspect?

No I wold say not. it is important. In a good bench load every aspect is important. Every round must be consistant with every other round. the velocity out the barrel is where you need the consistancy. If there is an inconsistancy in any component the velocity will not be consistant. Powder and bullet factors I would think are the greatest elements of error. However I think you will find the factor that separates the top 1% of the shooters is the ability to dope the wind. in other words, the shootest.


is neck tension the most critical aspect of a good benchrest load,I would think that it is. what are your thoughts??
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Old October 23, 2006, 07:17 PM   #4
kenneth owens
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yea,there are so many bullet,case ,powder,primer combinations to choose from.so many loading techniques to use,I guess thats why they call them
(MATCH) loads everything must match to have a perfect benchrest load
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Old October 23, 2006, 08:38 PM   #5
tINY
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Most of the benchresters have tight chambers and load the bullets out far enough that the bullet is pushed back into the case slightly as the chamber is locked.

In this situation, the tension is not very important at all. That's part of the game - keep things as consistent as possible and make as many of them as you can close to irrelevant.

What does become important in this situation is the case mouth thickness.




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Old October 23, 2006, 08:42 PM   #6
Ammo Junky
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FWIW, I aim for .0015" and accept .001 to .002 with bushing dies. With standard dies, They usualy give .002 to .003. I bought some preped 556 brass and they were .006" This was not good. I loaded them on a progressive and just ran them over an expander ball at the first station.
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Old October 24, 2006, 12:20 AM   #7
amamnn
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At the risk of sounding contrary, I have to say that I don't know anyone shooting in BR events locally who uses jam seating but does not pay close attention to neck tension. You still want a good grip on the bearing surface of the bullet; the goal being to seat to jam but move the bullet as little as possible. There are some good posts and articles to be found on the subject on benchrest.com and 6mmBR.com.
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Old October 24, 2006, 02:34 AM   #8
tINY
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You may well be right. I'm just looking at the problem from an engineering persective. Neck tension oughtn't be as critical in that situation, as the bullet being driven into the lands will mostly determine your initial pressure profile.



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