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Old October 21, 2006, 06:13 AM   #1
Jammer Six
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Chronograph purpose

Okay, a beginner's question.

Why would I care how fast a load goes, other than making power factor?

I don't play any of the gun games, I never have to make "power factors".

So why would I care about velocity?

If it hits the target, it hits the target, and if it doesn't, it doesn't.

In either case, what good is knowing how fast it hits the target?

What would I change in a load that doesn't hit the target, based on knowing the velocity?
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Old October 21, 2006, 07:39 AM   #2
kkb
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My reasons for a chrony:

For my SD guns I've worked up practice loads that duplicate weight/velocity of the factory rounds I carry. This lets me train with the same physics but at a much lower cost than the fancy stuff.

On another note some bullets have an optimum velocity range for terminal performance - too slow and they don't fully expand, to fast and they come apart or when working with cast can cause leading etc.

Also velocity can indicate when you're hitting the point where you're over charging the case; if ya add powder but velocity doesn't change much yer probably burning powder after the bullet has left the barrel.

And, of course, if the bullet is going way fast you've probably exceeded pressure specs.
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Old October 21, 2006, 07:55 AM   #3
rwilson452
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Why Chrono?

When using a rifle knowing the velocity and other published factors such as Ballistic Co-efficient, you can predict bullet drop over distance. A must for long range varmint hunters
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Old October 21, 2006, 08:30 AM   #4
cdoc42
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In my view, the chronograph adds to the experimentation forum of the reloading experience. If you load just 2 or 3 calibers, using the same bullets, powder and primers that someone suggested and you found that happened to produce the desired accuracy, you don't need a chronograph.

If you have a 300- or 400 yard range, you don't need a chronograph. But if you're limited to 100 yards and you're going on a trip where you'll need to shoot to 300 yards or so, you can't look in the manual to get your expected trajectory if you don't know how fast your load is going. If the book says a particular load will produce 3000 fps, it doesn't mean that will happen in your rifle. It may not even be close. If you've paid all that money for a trip and happen upon a 300 yard "taker" thinking your bullet will drop 5 inches, and it really drops 9 inches, well, you get the picture.

If you read a lot and apply it to your reloading, you don't need a chronograph. Just believe what you read. But as you experiment with loads and use a chronograph, you'll find for yourself what many say here, as has been said above.

But perhaps most simply, as reloaders get into their hobby, invariably the question burns in one's mind: I wonder just how fast that bullet is going?
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Old October 21, 2006, 09:28 AM   #5
Jammer Six
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Quote:
But perhaps most simply, as reloaders get into their hobby, invariably the question burns in one's mind: I wonder just how fast that bullet is going?
Oh, you had to say that...
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