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Old September 24, 2006, 01:48 PM   #1
Freetacos
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Reloading for a newbie

I have never reloaded before, but I would like to start soon.

My question is with your average reloading equipment that the average civilian uses and using average brass and bullets, roughly how long would it take with some practice to reload 1,000 9mm fmj's and at about what cost. or for other popular pistol calibers for that matter if you are not familiar with reloading the nine.

I would be reloading mostly for range practice ammo and am wondering whether it would just be cheaper to by winchest white box 100rnds for $11.86 each at Walmart.
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Old September 24, 2006, 03:44 PM   #2
CrustyFN
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I don't reload yet but have ordered my equipment. I save brass and pick up newer brass at the range when I get a chance. By my calculations without buying brass I will be able to reload 9mm for around $6 per 100. I have had conformation on that number for other experienced reloaders. As far as time I can't help you there. The press I ordered they say you can load 200 to 250 per hour once you get the hang of it. Check out the link below. That is the press I ordered. Hope this helps.
Rusty

http://www.leeprecision.com/html/Hel...5%20case-1.wmv
http://www.leeprecision.com/html/Hel...20turret-1.wmv
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Old September 24, 2006, 03:55 PM   #3
raymond-
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if you save brass and buy reloading components wisely, yes, you can save
$ by reusing brass. but bear in mind that 9mm surplus is cheap and, depending
on your job/time, it may not be worth your time. my cousin is a ICU physician
and the several hours he's on the job will earn far more than the $ he saves
trying to reload. so the prevailing argument that focuses just on material cost
is somewhat bogus. what is your time worth? if little, then reloading can be
well worth the investment.

there is also an intangible factor: enjoyment, education, and tailoring loads
to your firearm. carefully controlled, repeatable and measurable ballistics are
others. getting away from the kids and wife are more. having a hobby is
another. you gets muh drift.....

p.s. on the high side, i reload for 50 BMG which, on the market, can cost between
$1.50-$6 per round. natch, I reload here....especially when it's crucial to match
predictable ammo with my rifle when beyond 500 meters
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Old September 24, 2006, 04:48 PM   #4
Freetacos
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raymond, if you reread my post, that's why I asked how long it takes on average
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Old September 24, 2006, 05:34 PM   #5
Wild Bill Bucks
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If you get your powder charger set up with the correct charge, and you have your primers ready, and your brass and bullets handy, it takes about 12 to 15 seconds per round to actually load. Your set up time to set your dyes, and your powder charger, and fill your priming tool, and case preperation, will take about an hour originally. Once your dyes are set, they will not take 15 seconds to put in your press. Case preperation, and priming can be done while you watch TV, in your spare time.

I can generally load about 250 rounds in an hour, for a .44 magnum. If I am making rounds that I want to hunt with, then I weight every charge, and this takes a little longer. Cuts me down to about 100 rounds per hour.

Does this help?
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Old September 24, 2006, 05:40 PM   #6
Freetacos
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Thanks Wild Bill Bucks,

It appears that reloading is a viable alternative especially with magnum loads and expensive rifle ammo.
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Old September 24, 2006, 06:08 PM   #7
Wild Bill Bucks
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I have 3 police officers for children, and guess who gets to do their loading?

Let me tell you how I save time.

When you get your loader you will have to set the dyes up for the caliber you are shooting. This is a little time consuming, but follow the instructions, and you won't have to do it again.

When you get your powder charger set up, you will have to meter the powder that you want to use. Again, if you read the instructions, and set it up right, you won't have to do it again.(Always double check to make sure it is metering powder charge right before loading)

If you want to polish your brass, your tumbler should be used, and this takes no time out of your day at all, since the tumbler does all the work.
I put mine on a timer so that it shuts off when I want it to, kind of like the RonCo "Set it, and Forget it" thing.

Once your brass is tumbled and deprimed, you will run them through your sizer dye. This can be done very fast(Around 200 to300 rounds per hour)

You will need to deburr them and reprime them. This step is where I take my deburring tool, and my priming tool, to the TV set, and I can do them there.
Now your shells are ready to charge, and seat the bullet, whenever you can get around to it. Keep your cleaned and primed brass in a zip lock bag until you are ready to load.

You don't have to get in a hurry this way, and it lets you load them when you have spare time. I can generally get 50 rounds loaded before Mrs.WWB is getting ready for church.

If you change calibers, you will have to reset everything, but if one caliber is all you are loading, you will be amazed at how fast it goes, once you get started. This will not really save you a lot of money if you like to shoot, but it will give you a lot more shooting for the buck. I can shoot my .44 magnum about 3 times for the same amount of money it takes to shoot factory stuff.
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Old September 24, 2006, 06:22 PM   #8
Freetacos
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Sounds good Wild Bill Bucks,

btw.. I've notice massive quantities of brass on ebay for the cost of peanuts
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Old September 24, 2006, 07:18 PM   #9
skipjack
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Is it worth it? It is to me, I enjoy loading and can get the components assembled for half the price of wwb. I don't factor in the time,because it is a hobby, and it is time that would be spent on the internet or in front of the boob tube; not working. It is an even greater savings with 45acp or any magnum calibers. Shop carefully for bullets; I generally buy them by 500 or 1000 or more. Powder is also cheaper if you buy 4 or 8 lbs at a time. Hazmat fees can cause the price of mail order powder to get up there.
I usually get mine locally or at a gun show. Same deal with primers; try to buy in bulk.

If you are interested in loading pistol ammo, you may want to consider a turret press or progressive loader. I load 45 acp on a dillon square deal, and it does all the steps with one pull of the lever. I have to hand feed a bullet on one side and an empty shell on the other.

I also load 38 and 357 magnum on an old rcbs jr that requires a change of die for each step. Slower, but it does the job until I get the money together to get a progressive for that caliber.
I usually do lots of 50 or 100 with the jr; do every case with the die in the press and change for each step.

If you aren't sure you will like it, get a single stage press and a set of dies, etc. Lee makes good equipment that is very economically priced.
Good luck and good loading!
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Old September 24, 2006, 08:51 PM   #10
kansas45
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I recently started re loading again. Its been 15 years or so since I did any. I use a RCBS Rock Chucker. I will get a Dillon 550 before long, but for now I'm happy with the single stage. (I think I'm learning the art of reloading better with the single stage). Right now, I can easily load 100/hr of 9mm & 45ACP.
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Old September 25, 2006, 03:45 AM   #11
raymond-
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Quote:
raymond, if you reread my post, that's why I asked how long it takes on average
sorry, i set that aside and forgot during typing to answer. the challenge of
course is to balance speed with accuracy. i do not advocate loading while
watching the tele. stories of dbl charging are read on the gun boards far
more than should be. causal effect of inattention. yes, you can try for
1000 in 2 hrs, but I don't. I still verify visually, each round before the lead
is dropped into the case.

when performing in exercises which require fast follow up shot, a squib load,
no powder, or dbl charge can be catastrophic. every completed round is
weighed. yeah, anal...but i still wriggle all my fingers
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