The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old May 23, 2006, 11:15 AM   #1
croc4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 9, 2006
Location: Santa Clara, Ca
Posts: 190
Neck turning Brass - question

When neck turning brass, how far is too far?, do you turn the neck until the neck is all shaved evenly (all shiney new brass), I tried a few test shells last night and noticed that there were still a few small places that were not touched by the cutter, and wasn't sure how far was too far when trimming the necks
croc4 is offline  
Old May 23, 2006, 11:22 AM   #2
Mike Irwin
Staff
 
Join Date: April 13, 2000
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 35,892
Are you talking about shaving the neck to reduce the overall length and square the case mouth, or are you talking about shaving the neck around its circumference to provide proper chamber clearance when a round is seated?
__________________
"The gift which I am sending you is called a dog, and is in fact the most precious and valuable possession of mankind" -Theodorus Gaza

Baby Jesus cries when the fat redneck doesn't have military-grade firepower.
Mike Irwin is offline  
Old May 23, 2006, 11:41 AM   #3
croc4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 9, 2006
Location: Santa Clara, Ca
Posts: 190
I'm refering to shaving the thickness of the brass in the neck area, to make sure that the thickness of the neck is uniform. This improves the bullets contricity when seated in the shell amoung other things
croc4 is offline  
Old May 23, 2006, 05:02 PM   #4
CTC01
Member
 
Join Date: February 20, 2005
Location: IN
Posts: 36
When I set the neck turner (Forester) up I start by getting the cutter set so it has cut at least 1/2 to 3/4 around the neck. This has worked very well for me. Usually gets neck concentricity down under .004" (close enough for service rifle ) It is possible to take off too much, be careful I have trashed a few cases.
CTC01 is offline  
Old May 23, 2006, 06:51 PM   #5
Foxman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 13, 2005
Posts: 466
The acknowledged wisdom is to set your cutter to just turn roughly half way round the neck, this leaves it still thick enough to properly grip the bullet when standard dies are used. If you set it like this it will do for all cases of the same make. If you take off more the std dies will not provide enough grip to keep the bullet in place particularly if you put several rounds in the mag, each time you fire it will push the bullet back into the case, causing various problems like high pressure etc. Match shooters use special dies to suit the amount the turn off and ususally are only loading one round at a time. I do mine as above when the case is new and leave it at that and get good accuracy from it.
__________________
Better the man suspected of being a fool keep his mouth shut, than to open it and remove all doubt.
Foxman is offline  
Old May 23, 2006, 11:32 PM   #6
amamnn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 13, 2006
Location: WA, the left armpit of the USA
Posts: 1,323
neck turning

Once you have checked your brass for concentricity, and found it to be off, the next check on the neck is to check the neck walll thickness. If the neck is thicker on one side, make a mark on the shoulder there with a felt pen. You now set your neck turning tool to gently but firmly touch the neck on that low side. After cutting, check the thickness again. If you have set your tool correctly, you should be done. You may see spots that have not been cut on the low side.
Turning the neck without checking the actual thickness of the neck wall is not going to help a lot if you don't know how much to take off and where. Also, neck turning does nothing at all to help if the neck is just cockeyed due to the brass not shrinking back uniformly after firing.
__________________
"If the enemy is in range, so are you." - Infantry Journal
amamnn is offline  
Old May 23, 2006, 11:34 PM   #7
amamnn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 13, 2006
Location: WA, the left armpit of the USA
Posts: 1,323
Correction

oops I meant to say to set your neck turning tool on the marked (THINNER) side of the case, taking care not to shave the shoulder.
__________________
"If the enemy is in range, so are you." - Infantry Journal
amamnn is offline  
Old May 24, 2006, 12:14 AM   #8
918v
Junior member
 
Join Date: September 25, 2005
Posts: 1,372
I turn 2/3 of the neck for thickness. The case then goes into a neck-ream die and I ream the inside, thereby forming the perfect neck without any internal or external flaws. Subsequent doughnouts are easily removed by reaming the neck in the die, and the die FL sizes too.

Or,

You can buy Norma brass or Lapua for alot more. My dies have paid for themselves several times over.
918v is offline  
Old May 24, 2006, 03:35 AM   #9
joneb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 10, 2005
Location: Central , OR
Posts: 1,731
A tube thickness micrometer should be used to check case neck thickness, when there are variations it's usally through out the whole case. A bench rest shooter would toss the brass, but they scrutinize the best of brass culling for a few grains of difference in weight. When working up loads I will index the cases, so that the case is orientated one way from sizing to firing.
joneb is offline  
Old May 26, 2006, 03:10 PM   #10
amamnn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 13, 2006
Location: WA, the left armpit of the USA
Posts: 1,323
neck turning

I used to toss any brass that was too thick on one side until a friend mentioned that he had done a side by side test of .30-06 brass that he'd turned and brass that had not needed turning. All the brass was identical in size and weight. (within .002" head to shoulder and neck length, and .5 grains in weight) He said he'd found no significant difference in 10 rounds of each.

I had to save up brass to get that many out of thickness and that close in weight, but eventually I was able to duplicate his experiment. Now I shoot the cases I have neck turned as fouling shots, but if I were hunting or not competing, I would have no problem using those cases just like the others.
__________________
"If the enemy is in range, so are you." - Infantry Journal
amamnn is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.08542 seconds with 9 queries