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Old April 30, 2006, 08:12 PM   #1
kirbymagnum
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Need some information.

I do not reload so i have some questions to help me understand what it takes to reload.
(1) What does the numbers on powder stand for example( Accurate 5744, Accurate 8700, Accurate 1680)?
(2)How do you set the bullet at the right depth? Does the loader do it for you or do you have to measure?
(3) Do you need a chronograph? Or does the reloading book accurately tell you the velocities?
(4) To measure the powder do you have to use a scale or does the handloader have dies to measure it for you?
(5) I hear people talking about working a load up and I assume they are adding more powder to achieve higher velocities and they are also trying not to create to much psi. When people are talking about working a load up are they going by the book? Or are they making custom loads?
(6) How do you know you are coming to your maximum psi?
(7) Did i forget anything that someone might want to add?
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Old April 30, 2006, 09:06 PM   #2
Leftoverdj
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(1) What does the numbers on powder stand for example( Accurate 5744, Accurate 8700, Accurate 1680)?

They are just names.

(2)How do you set the bullet at the right depth? Does the loader do it for you or do you have to measure?

You have to set the die. Procedure can get quite elaborate, but most of the time the magazine determines the length.

(3) Do you need a chronograph? Or does the reloading book accurately tell you the velocities?

Chrony is nice, but you don't have to have one. At best the reloading book gives a guess at the velocities your rifle will give.

(4) To measure the powder do you have to use a scale or does the handloader have dies to measure it for you?

Generally a scale, but there are volumetric measures that work fine if you allow plenty of safety margin.

(5) I hear people talking about working a load up and I assume they are adding more powder to achieve higher velocities and they are also trying not to create to much psi. When people are talking about working a load up are they going by the book? Or are they making custom loads?

Can be either.

(6) How do you know you are coming to your maximum psi?

With most pistol and low pressure rifle cartridges, you don't. You just have to go by the book. The pressure signs available to the handloader don't appear until pressure is fairly high. You should not be going close to max pressures until you have a good bit of experience.

(7) Did i forget anything that someone might want to add?

You're worrying about the wrong stuff. Accuracy and safety are a lot more important than max anything.
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Old April 30, 2006, 09:43 PM   #3
SDLAW
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dj is right, accuracy and safety are the primary concerns, but I would also add consistancy to the list. In my experience, the most accurate loads almost always come from the middle of the load ranges listed in the manuals. Some reloaders try for max velocities and will push the envelope, but for me hitting what I aim at is far more important than getting big numbers on a chronograph.
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Old May 1, 2006, 12:57 AM   #4
Smokey Joe
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Reloading

Kirby Magnum--Good advice from both of the above posters!

If you're thinking about getting into reloading, or are just wondering about how it's done, THE BEST book on the subject, bar none, is The ABC's of Reloading put out by Krause Publishing www.krause.com

Krause must be doing something right; the book is in its 7th edition. The 6th is good too, if you happen on a copy of that.

Anyhow, The ABC's is where all new reloaders should start their learning curve. It is a how-to and more importantly a why-and-why-not-to kind of book, covers all aspects of reloading, stresses safety, gives you a great overall picture of the subject. Has plenty of good info for experienced reloaders, too, BTW--it doesn't stop with the first steps!

If you decide not to get into reloading, after reading The ABC's, you will have a much greater appreciation and deeper understanding of what goes into the ammunition we shoot. So either way, you can't lose.

You can get The ABC's thru yr local sptg gds sto, gun sho, the I'net, or order from the publisher direct from their website.
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Old May 1, 2006, 05:08 AM   #5
qajaq59
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All the above

All the above is good info. The only thing I would add is do not use loading data that you get from guys on the web, and that includes me. And check this list of certified instructors. There may be one near you and he would be your best bet for getting started correctly. http://www.reload-nrma.com/NRAinstruc.html
Reloading is not hard if you go by the book, and it really does add tremendously to the shooting hobby.
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Old May 1, 2006, 02:07 PM   #6
Rico567
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+1 on what the above posters have said, especially "Smokey Joe." You need to read a good manual so that you understand it. From reading your post, you are trying to get into reloading by hitting the ground running before you walk. This is understandable if you've been "bit by the bug," but in reloading, such an approach can be hazardous to your health. Take your time, learn, and enjoy! Welcome to a great pastime.
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Old May 1, 2006, 04:38 PM   #7
kirbymagnum
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Thanks for all of the well written replies and the outstanding information.
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Old May 1, 2006, 04:50 PM   #8
Dave R
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Just to expand on a couple of the answers...

Quote:
(2)How do you set the bullet at the right depth? Does the loader do it for you or do you have to measure?
There are several techniques for getting length right:
1. Most reloading manuals have recommended lengths. They'll be safe in 'most' guns.
2. You can customize overall length to your rifle, using a either a gauge built for the purpose, or by marking the end of a bullet with candle smoke or a marker, and chambering it to see if you get marks indicating the bullet is contacting the rifling. That process is described in most reloading manuals, and in the instructions in most die sets. In rifles, playing with length until the bullet is just off the lands will sometimes increase accuracy. After you determine the right length, you set your die and it makes all cartridges the same.

Quote:
I hear people talking about working a load up
You always start below the max listed in a reloading manual, and add more powder, looking for either the most accurate load, or the fastest SAFE load. Usually, the most accurate is under the max. That's where you want to be. Short version--the barrel "whips" as the cartridge burns and the bullet travels down the bore. Like a hose when you turn on the water. Every wave had a max waveheight and a min waveheight. You're basically tuning the load so the bullet exits the bore at the min waveheight. That's where the barrel is moving least. I may not have explained that well. Someone can correct me.
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Old May 1, 2006, 05:36 PM   #9
hivel37
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When working a load "up", for accuracy, sometimes the powder charge is reduced. As already stated, best accuracy is usually gained by using less powder (under max). Language is a wonderful thing.
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Old May 2, 2006, 12:04 AM   #10
Buckythebrewer
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I started with a Lee reloading book and highly recommend there products If you are on a budget.don't think you need to spend alot to make great ammunition.Just before you purchase any equipment GET ONE OF THE BOOKS ON RELOADING (a.b.c. ,lymann,LEE ,ETC,ETC)That way you can deside on what type of equipment will be best for your reloading needs/want's.There are very simple and easy ,cheap ways to make great ammo and there are complex,hard and expensive ways to make great ammo(and the expensive equipment can make poor quality ammo more likely if you don't know how to use it).Trust me(stranger) and start simple and easy.Even LEE's CHEAP equipment can make very accurate and quality ammo..you will have alot of fun If you take the time to read and understand reloading books.You won't have to say "why the f*ck did I buy that when I didn't even need it or can't use it???!!!"BUY the BOOK/books and enjoy the wealth of knowledge inside..Then make a wise decision on your purchase..good luck
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