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Old February 17, 2006, 10:13 PM   #1
BRZ
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Beginner Reloader needs basic q answer>>

I have had such great luck in other threads here that I thought I would pose another question with all of you.

I am a beginner realoader. I have a Lee Press with all the std accessories. I have a 30-06, .357mag and .380 that I have learned to reload. I have been following the 'book' to the letter, start loads only to this point. My purpose was #1 to save money #2 to customize loads #3 to have fun.

SO here goes the question(s).

1> I have found that there are many cases where there is no match to be found with calibre+bullet weight+bullet type+powder combinations. Do you guys find it easy to and safe to match all of the above with the nearest match and just go with it? Like, 100grain round nose in Magtech not listed but another make is listed under same weight...

2> Can a too snug of a fit bullet, cause a case to show signs that might otherwise look like a too heavy load? Primer rear expansion/case bulge?

3> in my 357 mag reloads, a formula is listed for the powder I use. The powder only fills the case about half maybe less. Is that a problem?

Any experienced out there, I would appreciate input if you have any.
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Old February 17, 2006, 11:58 PM   #2
rwilson452
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Close?

1> I have found that there are many cases where there is no match to be found with calibre+bullet weight+bullet type+powder combinations. Do you guys find it easy to and safe to match all of the above with the nearest match and just go with it? Like, 100grain round nose in Magtech not listed but another make is listed under same weight...

As long as your starting at the beginning load you shouldn't get into trouble as long as the bullets are generally equal. Jacketed and non jacked bullets are not equal. Close but no SEEgar.


2> Can a too snug of a fit bullet, cause a case to show signs that might otherwise look like a too heavy load? Primer rear expansion/case bulge?

A bullet that is too large can cause some grief like not chambering. Most often when loading bottle neck brass a bullet that seems large when you seat it is a case that was not chamfered correctly.

3> in my 357 mag reloads, a formula is listed for the powder I use. The powder only fills the case about half maybe less. Is that a problem?

It's only a problem if you don't pay attention and double charge. ( put powder in twice thus getting a charge that is twice the charge.) this is bad JU-JU and can lead to Ker BOOMS.
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Old February 23, 2006, 08:26 PM   #3
kidcoltoutlaw
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I do this

It works real good to. Pick a load that gives the best velocity and fills the case up. Like H110 or 296 in a 357 Mag if you screw up and try to double charge it the powder will not fit it will run the case over. Idiot proof loads I use then not just because I may be an Idiot but because they give the best accuracy and the best velocity.
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Old February 23, 2006, 09:58 PM   #4
rnovi
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Please note that with H110/296 it is NOT recommended to reduce powder charges below 3%! Those powders require a (near) full case over a mag primer to effectively ignite.

2400 is a more forgiving powder from that perspective. IF you absolutely want to push the magnum limits, H110/296 & Lil Gun are the powders to beat. If you want a good, solid, high power load that is not an all out "Max" load, 2400 is likely the powder of choice. I personally prefer 2400 for the added flexibility of loading.

Your comment on bullet size causing excess pressure indicators: Yes, it can. But let's consider some things: Lead bullets are NOT sized the same as jacketed bullets. A jacket .357 bullet mikes out at .357 (I think. Might be 358. Play along here.) whereas a lead bullet will (virtually always) size out .001 larger (or in Cowby Action, often .001 - .003 oversized). So a lead bullet will be .358/.359 in size. This is normal that lead is sized slightly larger than a jacketed bullet - it's intentional.

Gotta make sure you are comparing apples to apples here: in this case, jacketed to jacketed bullets and lead to lead when it comes to sizing.

So, let's say you used a .358 sized Jacketed bullet instead of a .357 jacketed bullet (do they even make one? I don't know for sure here.) then yes, the added case tension on the oversized jacketed bullet can increase case pressures. If you choose to use an oversized bullet, start your load development again with miminum recommended charges to be safe and check for pressure signs.

Better safe than sorry.

And as Wilson said, don't worry about not filling up the whole case. Some powders (such as Titegroup) are designed to work with minimal charges and off kilter powder positions in case. But said TG loads are also extremely easy to double charge.

Double and triple charges = EXTREMELY BAD JUJU!

Hope that helps.
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Old February 24, 2006, 01:54 AM   #5
azredhawk44
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Quote:
2> Can a too snug of a fit bullet, cause a case to show signs that might otherwise look like a too heavy load? Primer rear expansion/case bulge?
You mean when you crimp the bullet, the case is bulged afterwards?

That's not good. Lighten the crimp. On your first round, leave the crimp/seating die nice and high in the press. Just work on seating the bullet to your given length (1.600 inches, IIRC). Once you obtain that length, back off the seating pin a bunch while the cartridge is still fully up in the die's body. Bring down the die body further until it makes contact with the cartridge. You may need to continue to back off the seating pin to make room. Once you feel contact between the die body and the cartridge mouth, give the die another 1/8 turn or so. Bring the seating pin back down to where it is just touching the top of the bullet. Lock every thing in place. Put your next cartridge and bullet in there, and you will get the exact same crimp and depth each time.

Revolver cartridges take more crimp than most automatic handgun cartridges since they headspace off the rim rather than the mouth, but still don't require very much unless shooting extremely powerful loads that can rattle the bullet off the cartridge in the remaining rounds in the cylinder. Hopefully you aren't loading to that level of power quite yet. If/when you do, seat your bullets first and then use a separate crimping die.
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