The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old February 22, 2006, 08:04 AM   #1
F1sh
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 27, 2005
Posts: 121
Best reload manual?

Hi all,

I'm going to start reloading and was wondering which manual would be my best bet. If it matters I'll be reloading .38spc, .44 mag/spc, 303, 7.5 x 55, and possibly some .223 and 7.62 x .39 specialty loads.

Thanks
__________________
Glock 22 .40
Taurus 85 .38
Ruger Super Redhawk .44 mag 7.5"
MAK 90 7.62 x 39
Russian SKS 7.62 x 39
Enfield No4 Mk1 .303
Swiss K31 7.5 x 55
Stevens 200 .223
Marlin Glenfield 60 .22
F1sh is offline  
Old February 22, 2006, 11:58 AM   #2
1tomcat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 27, 2005
Posts: 147
For cast bullets I prefer the Lyman manual, speer also makes an excellent manual,=.
These are my choices and am sure others have different ideas
1tomcat is offline  
Old February 22, 2006, 12:29 PM   #3
RonC1
Member
 
Join Date: February 10, 2006
Location: East of the mountains
Posts: 35
There probably, or arguably, isn't a 'best' manual. It gets expensive but I have purchased a LoadBook for each caliber I reload.

This a caliber specific flimsy, photocopied manual, that gives combines virtually all the published load data for a single caliber from recognized sources, Speer, Hornady, Sierra, Lyman, RCBS, Hodgdon, IMR, Alliant, etc.

They cost about $7-$8 each. And, no, the sources rarely agree with each other and often their velocity data is at odds with what I actually get in my firearm. That is the nature of the reloading. The manuals are just a guide to help define safe limits.
RonC1 is offline  
Old February 22, 2006, 01:54 PM   #4
loggerhead
Junior member
 
Join Date: February 10, 2006
Location: Right of the Mississippi but South of the Mason Dixie line
Posts: 132
tpmv. were can I buy some "loadbooks."?
loggerhead is offline  
Old February 22, 2006, 02:03 PM   #5
caz223
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 15, 2002
Location: Michigan
Posts: 1,383
http://www.midwayusa.com/esearch.exe...=loadbooks+usa
__________________
I'm not just a gun.
I'm YOUR gun.
(Hold me.)
caz223 is offline  
Old February 22, 2006, 02:33 PM   #6
Leftoverdj
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 15, 2004
Posts: 934
The best loading manual is Ken Water's "Pet Loads". The most comprehensive is Lee's "Modern Reloading".
Leftoverdj is offline  
Old February 22, 2006, 03:20 PM   #7
caz223
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 15, 2002
Location: Michigan
Posts: 1,383
Pet loads was a great book 10 years ago, but it isn't up to date, AFAIK.
It has so much good info that it will never really be obsolete.
Ackley's works are excellent reference materials too.
Modern reloading by lee doesn't belong in the same sentence as pet loads. Or paragraph. It's just a promo for lee equipment.
If you're looking for a n00B book, ABCs of reloading, pretty much any edition (I like the 4th myself.). Lots of basic info. Get you some. Interesting read too, like keith.

The best load book is the one that has to most data that you need.
This can be free suppliments, online sources, a library of caliber specific loadbooks, or a set of reputable manuals.
Get as much info as you can. Then make up your own mind.
__________________
I'm not just a gun.
I'm YOUR gun.
(Hold me.)
caz223 is offline  
Old February 22, 2006, 03:41 PM   #8
MrGee
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 7, 2005
Location: NC
Posts: 258
Lymans # 48 Edition [newest version] is very good , gives all the info you'll need to start out with, even accuracy loads along with OAL measurements .. Sierra's loading manual would be a second choice, having both is even better..
MrGee is offline  
Old February 22, 2006, 03:44 PM   #9
Rico567
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 19, 2005
Posts: 162
The first manual I used (40 years ago now...) was Lyman's, I think the 45th Ed. Some time later I got the Speer #8, and liked it well enough that I've kept it as my main reference. I've got #13 now, and #14 should be out pretty soon. I hope they do a good job of updating it for the new powders; there have been a bunch introduced in the last few years.
__________________
"Dear reader, suppose you are a member of Congress. Now, further suppose you are an idiot. But I repeat myself."

- Mark Twain
Rico567 is offline  
Old February 22, 2006, 04:14 PM   #10
ClarkEMyers
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 13, 2004
Location: PacWest
Posts: 455
Phil Sharpe's was the best; it's obsolete.

Earl Naramore had a great one in Principles and Practice... and Townsend Whelan's Why Not Load Your Own was the best introduction in its day. There is no single best manual available today and Pet Loads is obsolete too. Bob Hagel's Game Loads and Practical Ballistics... was better in its day than anything newer but it too is obsolete. The subsequent reprint by Wolfe and Wolfe's collection of Hagel's writing in their journals shouldn't be missed.

In particular the use of a chronograph in estimating pressure is not well enough covered in modern manuals and there is too much hangover from the days of measuring case expansion and judging pressure by looking at the primer and the case head.

For load information the powder vendor's manuals are a good check for pressure tested loads and the manual by the maker of the bullet you choose to use should always be read thoroughly. After that reading everything you can get your hands on is wise.
ClarkEMyers is offline  
Old February 22, 2006, 07:36 PM   #11
AlaskaMike
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 26, 2005
Posts: 906
I have Lyman #48, Speer #12, and a couple of loadbooks, along with Pet Loads. I mostly rely on my Lyman manual, not only because it's my most recent, but also because it lists OALs and pressures. The Speer manuals have always bugged me because of the lack of this info.

Mike
AlaskaMike is offline  
Old February 22, 2006, 07:58 PM   #12
goose2w1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 8, 2005
Posts: 120
One easy way to start getting information is the web sites for all the different powder, and some of the bullet manufactures. You can print out all their recipies for free. As for regular load manuals I like Speer and sierra's.
goose2w1 is offline  
Old February 22, 2006, 08:13 PM   #13
farmall
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 7, 2004
Location: Beatrice Nebraska
Posts: 609
I have been most impressed with the Sierra manual. The Lyman is excellent too. Started with "Modern Reloading" and did ok, lots of info, and sales pitch, though. My point is that they all have useful info. Thats why most of us have so many! My only problem is that the Loadbooks, while informative, are also getting somewhat outdated.
Andy
farmall is offline  
Old February 22, 2006, 08:35 PM   #14
Leftoverdj
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 15, 2004
Posts: 934
Quote:
Modern reloading by lee doesn't belong in the same sentence as pet loads. Or paragraph. It's just a promo for lee equipment.
Caz, I almost agree with you, but I was talking about the data. It has as much current data as you are going to find in one place. It also has really good cast bullet info.
Leftoverdj is offline  
Old February 22, 2006, 09:53 PM   #15
goose2w1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 8, 2005
Posts: 120
I don't want to steal this thread, but I thought I'd ask this. With the differences in data from the powder maker, bullet maker, and press maker, who do you go with?
goose2w1 is offline  
Old February 22, 2006, 11:37 PM   #16
rwilson452
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 10, 2004
Location: Tioga co. PA
Posts: 2,368
Who's Data??

Of the three I would suggest that the data on the powder makers web sight to be the most accurate. Sadly most of those sights are a little skimpy in data
as they don't cover all bullets. That is the reason I consult more than one source. If something seems out of tolerance I do more research. A case in point would be check the max load for H-380 in a 55gr bullet for 22-250. Check your manuals then check the Hodgdon's web page. I accually called Hodgdon on this one. There was a BIG difference.



I don't want to steal this thread, but I thought I'd ask this. With the differences in data from the powder maker, bullet maker, and press maker, who do you go with?
rwilson452 is offline  
Old February 23, 2006, 12:27 AM   #17
MrGee
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 7, 2005
Location: NC
Posts: 258
i think the opening question by F1sh has basically been answered hopefully .. to further help with other statements made .. [the max load for H-380 in a 55gr bullet for 22-250] .. [I don't want to steal this thread, but ] .. cross reference between book loading manuals, finding a difference i
think is do to what they test the powders with .. it use to drive me crazy too, but looking at opening page for each caliber says what was tested like Lyman as example i have # 43 , 44 , 45 an 48 the newest [also have Sierras an #11 speer] each year they have tested w/ with a different firearm .. one mite say they used a Ruger w/ a 22" barrel, another year Win Model 70 or a Universal action w/24" barrel, then yet another mod.700 26" , cases, primers all being different as well .. i guess adding up all those things not even getting into free bore an chamber sizes could do it .. if i was just starting out i'd have to go with middle of the road as a new loader, pick out some products an work up/down from there. .. just my .02 cents ......... But,
i'd be curious on what Hodgdons answer was to you on that .. if you would share that info..?
MrGee is offline  
Old February 23, 2006, 07:42 PM   #18
loggerhead
Junior member
 
Join Date: February 10, 2006
Location: Right of the Mississippi but South of the Mason Dixie line
Posts: 132
caz223, thanks. I found them in the cabalas shooting and reloading catalog, order 3 different ones today. Will order a couple more later, don;t want too much to show up on the card, know what I mean.
I have been loading for over 40 years and all of my manuels are old and don;t have info for some of the newer powders, Don't know why I have never known of these "loadbooks." They sound like just what I am looking for and I will get me a general one just in case, like say a hornady.
Thanks, again.
loggerhead is offline  
Old February 23, 2006, 11:40 PM   #19
rwilson452
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 10, 2004
Location: Tioga co. PA
Posts: 2,368
Hodgdon and H-380

I really don't want to repeat what he told me. I don't want to get anyone getting carried away. I suspect they have reformulated H-380. So if you like 380 and want to load it look at their website.

As a final note. I always back off from max load and work my way back up looking for pressure signs. generally speaking when I start to see signs of over pressure, usually primers getting flattened real good that is where I stop. I load for accuracy and have found that without exception the max load is not the most accurate. IMNSHO generally speaking, powders that give the highest load density give the best accuracy. In the rifles I shoot C.O.A.L does as much for aacuracy as anything. In a case as big as a 30-06 +/- .5 grains doesn't mean much. but in smaller cases such as a .223 .3 grains can make a significant difference. I think there is a % of load thing here. So do you need to trickle charge your 30-06 load? not really. but for your .223 I sure would. When I do load development I tricle all loads untill I find the "sweet spot" and just how big it is. If I have enough room to play with that pet load I may not trickle charge.
rwilson452 is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:30 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.09299 seconds with 9 queries