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Old September 17, 2000, 10:08 PM   #1
Mike Irwin
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I'm thinking about a progressive, or semi-progressive (I've a thread below about the Dillon machines).

Someone mentioned Hornady's setup to me today.

Anyone have one, and want to share some comments?

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Old September 18, 2000, 09:07 AM   #2
9x45
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I have an older Hornady progressive with the thread in dies. I think the Dillion has a better primer system, but the Hornady has a better powder measure.
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Old September 18, 2000, 10:55 AM   #3
Guy B. Meredith
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As I mentioned elsewhere, my entry into handloading is a Hornady Lock-N-Load Auto Progressive. I've had no experience with other equipment.

I chose the Hornady because of the Swede's advice (haven't seen him here recently), their reputation, cost and features. The L-N-L AP is less than a Dillon 550B with 650 features. I was very anxious about doing stupid things (I'm the original "bull in a china shop" and Murphy is my closest acquaintance), so liked the auto index and the 5th station to accept the RCBS lockout die. The RCBS lockout prevents the press from operating if the case at that station has no powder or a double charge.

The ability to change out any one die without losing the setting is great as is the option to use the powder measure at any one of three stations. Great versitility.

The major items are to lube the powder measure and keep the priming system free from extraneous grains of powder--definitely does not like that. After that it is very easy to churn out 100 rounds in about 16 minutes after setup.

Again, I've not used other equipment for comparison, but the powder measure seems to be right on the nose all through the loading session. It may have problems with powders like Bullseye, but I haven't revisited that since discovering AA#2.

I've weighed out powder charges at various times and find it so consistent that I just crank through about six charges to ensure setup and maybe one or two after all stations are in use to check for any increase due to powder packing with vibrations. Never changes.



[This message has been edited by Guy B. Meredith (edited September 18, 2000).]
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Old September 18, 2000, 11:40 AM   #4
Mike Irwin
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Guy,

That's the kind of information I'm looking for! Thanks!

I'm thinking that the Hornady may just provide the best of both worlds. I'm only worried about its reliability.

I've not heard too many things about the Hornady, I've heard too many bad things about the Lee presses, and I've heard nothing but good about Dillon.

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Old September 18, 2000, 11:47 AM   #5
B9mmHP
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Mike I have also ask about the Hornady L-N-L.

I decided to buy it, I like not having to reset the dies every time I change cal. Still looking for the best price.
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Old September 18, 2000, 01:33 PM   #6
Mike Irwin
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by B9mmHP:
Mike I have also ask about the Hornady L-N-L.

I decided to buy it, I like not having to reset the dies every time I change cal. Still looking for the best price.
[/quote]

Hey B9mm, E-mail me, please.

kframe_19@yahoo.com

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Beware the man with the S&W .357 Mag.
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Old September 18, 2000, 11:02 PM   #7
Guy B. Meredith
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Mike,

I can't speak to the durability, though our former CServe moderator liked it. I've have put just under 5000 rounds through it and find no problems other than what I would expect to be normal cleanup.

I have had problems with the pin in the RCBS resizing/depriming die.

I would also like to go to roll crimp and will probably pick up a set of Hornady dies as I've heard good comments on them. I've been doing taper crimp with copper plated bullets, but find that is probably neither necessary nor desirable.
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Old September 18, 2000, 11:31 PM   #8
Kenneth L. Walters
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I had two of the early Hornady presses. One was serial number 6 if I recall. They were an ok sort of press but on mine, at least, the automatic indexing wasn't all that reliable.

I owned maybe seven different versions of the Dillon machines. Loved the little RL450 Jr. Probably had six of those. Sorry I ever sold them. The only two I have no experience with are the 1050 (I did have a 1000) and the 650. I certainly preferred these to either the Hornady or Lee.

The best machine, however, I think is the RCBS 2000 with their strip primer system. Excellent machine!
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Old September 19, 2000, 12:26 PM   #9
HandloaderJohn
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I just bought a RCBS 2000, I love it, works great, I got it for 299.00.
I also have a Dillion SBD for my 45acps, it is a great machine and it works great.
The reason I did not get a Hornady is a friend had trouble with the primer system.
Good luck.
PS: It came with the strip loader , 2 bullet trays, powder charger, one die plate.


[This message has been edited by HandloaderJohn (edited September 20, 2000).]
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Old September 19, 2000, 01:58 PM   #10
Henry P
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Just bought an rcbs pro 2000 and I really like this machine. The strip primer feed works great although I discovered on my machine neutral is about the halfway point(not at the bottom where the ram naturally falls) if you want to load one round only without advancing the strip. I'm sure the Hornady/Dillon machines are ok as well. I was tempted to get the Hornady because of the auto index(smoothest I've personally encountered) but went with the rcbs when I considered the advice of another member. In hindsight I'm glad I took the advice. Manual indexing gives you better control I believe(and doesn't slow you down that much, if something goes wrong it may save you time). I found choosing a press kind of emotional for some reason, maybe it's because I knew I was going to have to live with my choice for a long time. So far I'm really happy with my choice, paid $329.00 for mine and it came with a strip loader for free.
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Old September 19, 2000, 09:23 PM   #11
trlmech
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Henry P, How well does that strip loader work?
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Old September 20, 2000, 07:12 AM   #12
Henry P
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by trlmech:
Henry P, How well does that strip loader work? [/quote]

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Old September 20, 2000, 07:28 AM   #13
Henry P
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Henry P:
[/quote]

Sorry about the blank message. Just a few words on the strip primer system. Mine works perfectly. Loading a sinle case from start to finish may involve getting to know your particular machine a little. As you all know to seat a primer you have to go past the neutral position and push the handle all the way forward into the bench to seat a primer, this action causes the machine to index, and when loading progressively it works every time. But back to the single case. Just letting the handle fall to a natural neutral, to index the case, may be down far enough for the primer plug to catch the strip a little bit and index it. You will then skip 2 to 3 primers in the strip(depending on how many time you index and raise the ram). By controlling the fall of the handle and keeping it up slightly from this natural neutral you prevent the primer plug from engaging the strip and the problem is solved. I like using the strip loader for loose primers, it's even fun(mine came free with the machine--but is anything really free) I have never filled a primer tube so I can't say from experience but it would seem that would be tedious by comparison. If a person really wants a primer tube setup it is available as an option for I think about $75(has anyone out there tried it--I'm curious how it works though I can't see myself using it). Not to start a war over what machine is best(I believe there are alot of good ones), but if you are looking for a good loader that will last you a lifetime check out the pro 2000. I really like mine.


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Old September 20, 2000, 10:35 AM   #14
Guy B. Meredith
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The RCBS came out just as I was putting money together for equipment. It looked very attractive, particularly with the primer feed.

The deciding factors for the Hornady were the ability to change out individual dies to go to different brands, crimp type, individual or combined crimp/bullet seating, etc. Also the ability to move the powder measure around or remove/replace it seemed to make for more flexibility.

The auto indexing was also key as I just couldn't guarantee my concentration would be 100%. Same reason for the lockout die and both have proved valuable.

Now if I could just figure out how to add case and bullet feeds...
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Old September 20, 2000, 11:00 AM   #15
Mike Irwin
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I've used the RCBS strip system, and I'm just not as sold on it as some are. I really think in a lot of ways it's a solution looking for a problem.

But that's just me.

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Old September 20, 2000, 05:02 PM   #16
Guy B. Meredith
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I was rushed in my previous post and forgot to mention that in order to have the separate crimp and seating dies as well as the pistol mouth flaring die AND the RCBS lockout it is necessary to modify the Hornady powder measure.

The modification is to thread the throat of the shorter (rifle) powder sleeve to accept a Lyman MultiExpander Die insert for the appropriate caliber to allow powder drop and expansion at the same stage.
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